Reference : Unravelling the border-facade of France : a multi-level modelling of cross-border com...
Scientific congresses, symposiums and conference proceedings : Paper published in a book
Social & behavioral sciences, psychology : Human geography & demography
Social & behavioral sciences, psychology : Regional & inter-regional studies
http://hdl.handle.net/10993/40322
Unravelling the border-facade of France : a multi-level modelling of cross-border commuting
English
Pigeron-Piroth, Isabelle mailto [University of Luxembourg > Faculty of Language and Literature, Humanities, Arts and Education (FLSHASE) > Identités, Politiques, Sociétés, Espaces (IPSE) >]
Caruso, Geoffrey mailto [University of Luxembourg > Faculty of Language and Literature, Humanities, Arts and Education (FLSHASE) > Identités, Politiques, Sociétés, Espaces (IPSE) >]
Le Texier, Marion mailto [Université de Rouen > Département de Géographie]
9-Sep-2019
21st European Colloquium on Theoretical and Quantitative Geography (ECTQG), Book of Abstracts, Mondorf-las-Bains, 5-9 septembre 2019
Caruso, Geoffrey mailto
Gerber, Philippe mailto
Jones, Catherine mailto
Klein, Olivier mailto
Perchoux, Camille mailto
Yes
International
978-2-9199594-0-2
21st European Colloquium on Theoretical and Quantitative Geography (ECTQG)
5-9 sept 2019
LISER and University of Luxembourg
Mondorf-les-Bains
Luxembourg
[en] Borders ; Commuting ; Multi-level
[en] Given its central position in Western Europe, France is the European country where cross-border commuting is most intense. Over 350000 residents cross the national border everyday to go to work. Cross-border commuting raises a lot of concerns for planners on both side of each border, especially for provisioning transport infrastructure and local public services but also because it impacts land and housing markets, especially when salary differentials are high. While there is a lot of research about the daily functioning of specific borders (e.g. France-Switzerland or France-Luxembourg), generalization is lacking and spatial heterogeneities impede our understanding of the very determinants of cross-border commuting, such as the role of benefits differentials, transport costs and distance, or the relative availability of jobs at residential places and across the border. Further, these effects are most likely mediated differently by the socio-demographic characteristics of workers, their employment sector, and the quality of their residential environment at large. This suggests that an individual approach and a spatially detailed approach is needed, which contrasts sharply with the fact that most European-wide studies of cross-border commuting are conducted at very aggregated spatial scales (NUTS 2 or 3).
FNR
Researchers ; Students
http://hdl.handle.net/10993/40322
http://www.ectqg.eu/ectqg-2019/

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