Reference : More Necessary and Less Sufficient: An Age-Period-Cohort Approach to Overeducation in...
Scientific journals : Article
Social & behavioral sciences, psychology : Sociology & social sciences
http://hdl.handle.net/10993/38291
More Necessary and Less Sufficient: An Age-Period-Cohort Approach to Overeducation in Comparative Perspective
English
Bar-Haim, Eyal mailto [University of Luxembourg > Faculty of Language and Literature, Humanities, Arts and Education (FLSHASE) > Integrative Research Unit: Social and Individual Development (INSIDE) >]
Chauvel, Louis mailto [University of Luxembourg > Faculty of Language and Literature, Humanities, Arts and Education (FLSHASE) > Integrative Research Unit: Social and Individual Development (INSIDE) >]
Hartung, Anne mailto [University of Luxembourg > Faculty of Language and Literature, Humanities, Arts and Education (FLSHASE) > Integrative Research Unit: Social and Individual Development (INSIDE) >]
2019
Higher Education
Kluwer Academic Publishers
Yes (verified by ORBilu)
International
0018-1560
1573-174X
Netherlands
[en] Overeducation ; Returns to education ; Educational expansion ; Skill-biased technological change ; Age-period-cohort model
[en] In many countries, the skilled labor market has lagged educational expansion. As a result of increased competition, younger cohorts of the highly educated face decreasing returns to education or overeducation. Surprisingly, decreasing occupational outcomes do not coincide empirically with the economic returns among those with tertiary education. Regarding the process of changes in economic returns to education based on cohort transformations, we expect that the expansion of tertiary education affects specific cohorts, which find themselves facing more labor market competition. As a result, the economic returns to education should decrease among younger cohorts even when the overall returns to education remain stable over time. To study this process, we model economic returns with a new age-period-cohort-trended lag (APCTLAG) method, which allows us to compare the gap in economic returns between tertiary and less than tertiary education over cohorts. Using the Luxembourg Income Study (LIS), we analyze trends over three decades in 12 countries. Our results confirm that educational returns for tertiary education have declined over time, even though the gap between the educated and the less educated has remained similar in most of the countries. For younger cohorts, tertiary education has become more necessary to survive in the competitive labor market, but the actual economic returns have decreased—making tertiary education less sufficient than before.
Fonds National de la Recherche - FnR
PEARL Chair project FNR/P11/05 and of the NORFACE-DIAL project “The impact of childhood circumstances over the life-course, IMCHILD, project INTER/NORFACE/16/11333934
http://hdl.handle.net/10993/38291
10.1007/s10734-018-0353-z
This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made.
FnR ; FNR9522302 > Louis Chauvel > ProSocial > A Research Programme on Social Inequality within the National, European and International Context > 01/06/2012 > 31/03/2018 > 2011

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