Reference : Body Mass Index and Social Interactions from Adolescence to Adulthood
Scientific congresses, symposiums and conference proceedings : Unpublished conference
Business & economic sciences : Special economic topics (health, labor, transportation…)
http://hdl.handle.net/10993/36617
Body Mass Index and Social Interactions from Adolescence to Adulthood
English
Joxhe, Majlinda mailto [University of Luxembourg > Faculty of Law, Economics and Finance (FDEF) > Center for Research in Economic Analysis (CREA) >]
Corrado, Luisa [University of Rome "Tor Vergata" > DEI]
Distante, Roberta [University of Copenhagen]
Jul-2018
No
International
2018 Add Health Users Conference
23-07-2018 to 24-07-2018
University of North Carolina
NIH-National Institute of Health, Besethda (Washington DC)
USA
[en] Overweight ; Obesity ; Peer Effects, ; Social Networks ; Personal History ; Dynamic Linear-in-means Model
[en] This paper proposes a novel approach to address identi fication of social endogenous e ects by
generalizing the methods commonly used in standard dynamic panel data analysis to the peer e ffects
setting. Our methodology shows to can estimate peer e ects free of the \re
"reflection problem" in a dynamic context where individual- and group-specifi c unobservable e ects are controlled for. We apply a dynamic linear-in-means model for analyzing the importance of social ties for the body-weight-related behavior of US youth. We show that the main drivers of body-weight-related behavior are habituation and imitation eff ects. For individuals who were normal-weight during adolescence habits seem to be slightly enforced by imitative behavior: in this instance, for an 1% increase in average BMI we expect about 0:6% increase in individual BMI, whereas the coe cient for past BMI is 0:4%. Imitation e ffects, instead, explain most of the variation in the Body Mass Index of
individuals who were overweight and obese during adolescence, signaling the presence of a social
multiplier e ffect: for these two groups an increase of 1% in average BMI leads, respectively, to an
increase of 0:2% and 0:4% in current BMI.
Researchers ; Professionals
http://hdl.handle.net/10993/36617
https://www.cpc.unc.edu/projects/addhealth/events/2018-add-health-users-conference-agenda

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