Reference : Teacher Attitudes towards Ethnic Minority Students: Effects of Schools´ Cultural Diversity
Scientific journals : Article
Social & behavioral sciences, psychology : Education & instruction
http://hdl.handle.net/10993/36543
Teacher Attitudes towards Ethnic Minority Students: Effects of Schools´ Cultural Diversity
English
Glock, Sabine [Bergische Universität Wuppertal]
Kovacs, Carrie [Johannes Kepler Universität Linz]
Pit-Ten Cate, Ineke mailto [University of Luxembourg > Faculty of Language and Literature, Humanities, Arts and Education (FLSHASE) > Education, Culture, Cognition and Society (ECCS) >]
21-Sep-2018
British Journal of Educational Psychology
online first
Yes
International
[en] ethnic minority students ; implicit attitudes ; explicit attitudes ; cultural diversity ; stereotypical beliefs
[en] Background: Research exploring mechanisms driving inequalities in school systems, has found that biased teacher judgments contribute to observed disadvantages for ethnic minority students. Teacher judgments may be driven by explicit and implicit attitudes.
Aims: The current research explored the effect of cultural diversity at schools (actual or imagined) on teachers’ attitudes toward ethnic minority students.
Samples: One hundred and-five preservice teachers (90 female) with a mean age 26.20 of years (teaching experience: 57.55 weeks) participated in Study 1. Two hundred and thirty-one teachers (159 female) with a mean age of 41.00 years (teaching experience: 12.92 years) participated Study 2.
Method: Cultural diversity was operationalized via a fictive description of a school (Study 1) or via the actual proportion of ethnic minority students at the school (Study 2). An Implicit Association Test assessed implicit attitudes toward ethnic minority students. Explicit attitudes were assessed via questionnaire.
Results: Preservice teachers imagining a more culturally diverse school held more negative implicit attitudes toward ethnic minority students than those imagining a less diverse school. In contrast, in-service teachers actually working in more diverse schools held less negative implicit attitudes toward minority students. Preservice teachers associated teaching in culturally diverse schools with increased effort, whereas in-service teachers actually working in culturally diverse schools reported more enthusiasm toward teaching ethnic minority students.
Conclusions: This research shows the challenge and the negative stereotypes preservice teachers associate with culturally diverse schools, while inservice teachers’ negative associations may be buffered by the actual experience of working with ethnic minority students.
Researchers
http://hdl.handle.net/10993/36543
10.1111/bjep.12248
https://rdcu.be/7w91

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