Reference : Revisiting the Structure of Subjective Well-Being in Middle-Aged Adults
Scientific journals : Article
Social & behavioral sciences, psychology : Social, industrial & organizational psychology
http://hdl.handle.net/10993/3605
Revisiting the Structure of Subjective Well-Being in Middle-Aged Adults
English
Chmiel, Magda mailto [University of Luxembourg > Faculty of Language and Literature, Humanities, Arts and Education (FLSHASE) > Educational Measurement and Applied Cognitive Science (EMACS) >]
Brunner, Martin mailto [University of Luxembourg > Faculty of Language and Literature, Humanities, Arts and Education (FLSHASE) > Educational Measurement and Applied Cognitive Science (EMACS) >]
Martin, Romain mailto [University of Luxembourg > Faculty of Language and Literature, Humanities, Arts and Education (FLSHASE) > Educational Measurement and Applied Cognitive Science (EMACS) >]
Schalke, Daniela mailto [University of Luxembourg > Faculty of Language and Literature, Humanities, Arts and Education (FLSHASE) > Educational Measurement and Applied Cognitive Science (EMACS) >]
2012
Social Indicators Research
Springer Science & Business Media B.V.
106
109-116
Yes (verified by ORBilu)
0303-8300
Dordrecht
The Netherlands
[en] Subjective well-being ; Satisfaction with life ; Positive affect ; Negative affect ; Bottom-up model ; Top-down model
[en] Subjective well-being is a broad, multifaceted construct comprising general satisfaction with life, satisfaction with life domains (health, family, people, free time, self, housing, work, and finances), positive affect, and negative affect. Drawing on representative data from middle-aged adults (N = 738), the authors used three different structural models to analyze the interrelationships among these facets of subjective well-being. In a top-down model, a single factor representing global subjective well-being explained the correlations found among the more specific facets of subjective well-being and exerted the strongest influence on general satisfaction with life, satisfaction with health, and satisfaction with finances. In a bottom-up model, satisfaction with the latter two domains had the strongest effect on global subjective well-being. The authors discuss the implications of their findings for research on subjective well-being.
http://hdl.handle.net/10993/3605

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