Reference : The role of parental control practices in explaining children’s diet, activity and BMI
Scientific journals : Article
Social & behavioral sciences, psychology : Animal psychology, ethology & psychobiology
Social & behavioral sciences, psychology : Neurosciences & behavior
Social & behavioral sciences, psychology : Theoretical & cognitive psychology
Social & behavioral sciences, psychology : Treatment & clinical psychology
Human health sciences : Psychiatry
http://hdl.handle.net/10993/3524
The role of parental control practices in explaining children’s diet, activity and BMI
English
Brown, Kerry A. [> >]
Ogden, Jane [> >]
Vögele, Claus mailto [University of Luxembourg > Faculty of Language and Literature, Humanities, Arts and Education (FLSHASE) > Integrative Research Unit: Social and Individual Development (INSIDE) >]
Gibson, E. Leigh [> >]
2008
Appetite
Academic Press
50
252-259
Yes (verified by ORBilu)
International
0195-6663
[en] Parental control ; Children’s diets ; BMI
[en] This paper aimed to investigate which parents use which types of parenting control practices to manage their children's diets and to assess the impact of these practices on children's dietary patterns and their BMI. A cross-sectional survey of 518 parents with children aged 4-7 years was carried out in 18 primary schools across the South of England. Measures included aspects of parental control practices and the child's diet. Results showed that older parents with a lower BMI and who were stay at home parents used more "snack overt control", "snack covert control" and "meal covert control" and those with more education used more covert control strategies. In contrast, male, non-white parents with younger children used more "pressure to eat". In terms of the children's diet, the results showed links between parental and child demographics and aspects of unhealthy and healthy food intake. In addition, links were also found for parental control practices. For example, eating more unhealthy snacks was related to less covert control and more pressure to eat, eating fruit and vegetables was related to higher levels of both overt and covert control over meals and less pressure to eat and being neophobic was related to less covert control over meals and more pressure to eat. The children's BMIs were unrelated to any variables measured in the study.
Researchers ; Professionals ; Students
http://hdl.handle.net/10993/3524
10.1016/j.appet.2007.07.010

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