Reference : Mixed stereotype content and attitudes toward students with special educational needs...
Scientific journals : Article
Social & behavioral sciences, psychology : Education & instruction
http://hdl.handle.net/10993/35057
Mixed stereotype content and attitudes toward students with special educational needs and their inclusion in regular schools in Luxembourg
English
Krischler, Mireille mailto [University of Luxembourg > Faculty of Language and Literature, Humanities, Arts and Education (FLSHASE) > Education, Culture, Cognition and Society (ECCS) >]
Pit-Ten Cate, Ineke mailto [University of Luxembourg > Faculty of Language and Literature, Humanities, Arts and Education (FLSHASE) > Education, Culture, Cognition and Society (ECCS) >]
Krolak-Schwerdt, Sabine [University of Luxembourg > Faculty of Language and Literature, Humanities, Arts and Education (FLSHASE) > Education, Culture, Cognition and Society (ECCS) >]
Feb-2018
Research in Developmental Disabilities
Elsevier Science
75
59-67
Yes (verified by ORBilu)
International
0891-4222
1873-3379
[en] Attitudes ; Stereotypes ; Challenging Behaviour ; Learning Difficulties ; Inclusion
[en] Background: Students with special educational needs (SEN) remain one of the most socially excluded and vulnerable groups. To this extent, negative attitudes and stereotypes may impede
their inclusion. Theoretical frameworks have suggested that stereotypes and attitudes elicit differential expectations and judgments, which in turn affect (social) behaviors.
Aims: In this study, we aimed to investigate the stereotypes and implicit attitudes held by a
sample of Luxemburgish adults toward students with learning difficulties and challenging behavior. We also explored the adults’ explicit attitudes towards inclusion.
Method and procedures: Participants (N=103) completed an evaluative priming task and rated
students on the stereotype dimensions of warmth and competence. In addition, they completed
the German version of The Opinions Relative to Integration of Students with Disabilities questionnaire and provided demographic information.
Outcomes and results: Results showed differential stereotype content with respect to students with learning difficulties and challenging behavior. Results further indicated that participants’ implicit attitudes toward both challenging behavior and learning difficulties were negative. By contrast, participants expressed positive attitudes towards inclusion.
Conclusions and implications: The results of the current study contribute to the understanding of
why some people accept, whereas others reject students with SEN. Understanding prevalent
stereotypes and attitudes can inform the development of targeted interventions to promote and
facilitate the social inclusion of students with SEN.
Researchers ; Professionals
http://hdl.handle.net/10993/35057
10.1016/j.ridd.2018.02.007
https://authors.elsevier.com/c/1WclP3Ahveggkz
FnR ; FNR7964914 > Ineke Pit-Ten Cate > INCLUS > Inclusive education: The effect of teacher characteristics and school support on inclusive practice > 01/05/2015 > 30/04/2018 > 2014

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