Reference : Affective evaluation of body images in anorexia nervosa
Scientific congresses, symposiums and conference proceedings : Paper published in a journal
Social & behavioral sciences, psychology : Neurosciences & behavior
Social & behavioral sciences, psychology : Treatment & clinical psychology
http://hdl.handle.net/10993/34601
Affective evaluation of body images in anorexia nervosa
English
Lutz, Annika mailto [University of Luxembourg > Faculty of Language and Literature, Humanities, Arts and Education (FLSHASE) > Integrative Research Unit: Social and Individual Development (INSIDE) >]
Herbert, Cornelia [Ulm University, Germany]
Schulz, André mailto [University of Luxembourg > Faculty of Language and Literature, Humanities, Arts and Education (FLSHASE) > Integrative Research Unit: Social and Individual Development (INSIDE) >]
Voderholzer, Ulrich [Schön Klinik Roseneck, Germany]
Koch, Stefan [Schön Klinik Roseneck, Germany]
Vögele, Claus mailto [University of Luxembourg > Faculty of Language and Literature, Humanities, Arts and Education (FLSHASE) > Integrative Research Unit: Social and Individual Development (INSIDE) >]
2017
Psychophysiology
Cambridge University Press
54
S1
Society for Psychophysiological Research, Abstracts for the Fifty-Seventh Annual Meeting, The Hofburg, Vienna, Austria, October 11-15 2017
Yes (verified by ORBilu)
International
0048-5772
1469-8986
New York
NY
57th Annual Meeting of the Society for Psychophysiological Research
from 11-10-2017 to 15-10-2017
Society for Psychophysiological Research
Vienna
Austria
[en] eating disorders ; affective startle eye-blink modification ; body image ; anorexia nervosa
[en] Anorexia nervosa is characterized by fear of weight gain. This is reflected in amygdala activation during confrontation with distorted photographs of oneself simulating weight gain. In contrast, photographs of emaciated women induce startle attenuation, suggesting a positive valuation of extreme slimness. To combine these findings, we applied an affective startle modulation paradigm containing photos of the participants simulating weight gain and photos simulating weight loss. We assessed eye-blink startle responses via EMG in 20 women with anorexia nervosa (AN; mean age = 25 years; mean BMI = 23) and 20 healthy control women (HC; mean age = 25 years; mean BMI = 23). We were able to replicate affective startle modulation of standard positive, negative, and neutral pictures, except for an absence of startle attenuation for positive pictures in AN. Body images did not modulate the startle response in either group. This was in contrast to the subjective ratings, in which the AN group indicated negative valence and high arousal for distorted body images. The body photographs used in our study emphasized general body shape and it appears that this was not threatening to AN patients. Photos highlighting body details might produce different results. Considering that body image exposure, a frequently used intervention tool for AN, aims at fear reduction through habituation, it is essential to determine which aspects of the body actually elicit fear responses to maximize therapy outcome.
Integrative Research Unit: Social and Individual Development (INSIDE) > Institute for Health and Behaviour
Fonds National de la Recherche - FnR
http://hdl.handle.net/10993/34601
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/psyp.2017.54.issue-S1/issuetoc
FnR ; FNR1081377 > Annika Petra Christine Lutz > NEUROBODY > Neurophysiological Correlates Of Body Image Disturbances In Anorexia Nervosa. > 15/03/2011 > 14/03/2015 > 2010

File(s) associated to this reference

Fulltext file(s):

FileCommentaryVersionSizeAccess
Limited access
Abstract_SPR.pdfAuthor preprint123.66 kBRequest a copy

Bookmark and Share SFX Query

All documents in ORBilu are protected by a user license.