Reference : Microfluidic Tensiometry Technique for the Characterization of the Interfacial Tensio...
Scientific journals : Article
Physical, chemical, mathematical & earth Sciences : Physics
Physics and Materials Science
http://hdl.handle.net/10993/34420
Microfluidic Tensiometry Technique for the Characterization of the Interfacial Tension between Immiscible Liquids.
English
Honaker, Lawrence William mailto [University of Luxembourg > Faculty of Science, Technology and Communication (FSTC) > Physics and Materials Science Research Unit >]
Lagerwall, Jan mailto [University of Luxembourg > Faculty of Science, Technology and Communication (FSTC) > Physics and Materials Science Research Unit >]
Jampani, Venkata mailto [University of Luxembourg > Faculty of Science, Technology and Communication (FSTC) > Physics and Materials Science Research Unit >]
5-Feb-2018
Langmuir
American Chemical Society
Yes (verified by ORBilu)
International
0743-7463
1520-5827
Washington
DC
[en] interfacial tension ; microfluidics
[en] The interfacial tension between two immiscible fluids is of critical importance for understanding many natural phenomena as well as in industrial production processes; however, it can be challenging to measure this parameter with high accuracy. Most commonly used techniques have significant shortcomings because of their reliance on other data such as density or viscosity. To overcome these issues, we devise a technique that works with very small sample quantities and does not require any data about either fluid, based on micropipette aspiration techniques. The method facilitates the generation of a droplet of one fluid inside of the other, followed by immediate in situ aspiration of the droplet into a constricted channel. A modified Young-Laplace equation is then used to relate the pressure needed to produce a given deformation of the droplet's radius to the interfacial tension. We demonstrate this technique on different systems with interfacial tensions ranging from sub-millinewton per meter to several hundred millinewton per meter, thus over 4 orders of magnitude, obtaining precise results in agreement with the literature solely from experimental observations of the droplet deformation.
European Commission - EC
Researchers ; Professionals
http://hdl.handle.net/10993/34420
10.1021/acs.langmuir.7b03494
H2020 ; 648763 - INTERACT - Intelligent Non-woven Textiles and Elastomeric Responsive materials by Advancing liquid Crystal Technology

File(s) associated to this reference

Fulltext file(s):

FileCommentaryVersionSizeAccess
Limited access
Honaker et al 2018.pdfPublisher postprint393.77 kBRequest a copy

Bookmark and Share SFX Query

All documents in ORBilu are protected by a user license.