Reference : Dreaming and health (Chapter 37)
Parts of books : Contribution to collective works
Social & behavioral sciences, psychology : Animal psychology, ethology & psychobiology
Social & behavioral sciences, psychology : Neurosciences & behavior
Social & behavioral sciences, psychology : Theoretical & cognitive psychology
Social & behavioral sciences, psychology : Treatment & clinical psychology
Human health sciences : Psychiatry
http://hdl.handle.net/10993/3442
Dreaming and health (Chapter 37)
English
Vögele, Claus mailto [University of Luxembourg > Faculty of Language and Literature, Humanities, Arts and Education (FLSHASE) > Integrative Research Unit: Social and Individual Development (INSIDE) >]
Sep-2014
Dream consciousness: Allan Hobson's new approach to the brain and its mind
Tranquillo, Nicholas
Springer
Vienna Circle Institute Yearbook, Volume 3
219-220
Yes
987-3-319-07295-1
Heidelberg
[en] Dream ; consciousness ; health ; exposure ; emotion regulation ; neuroscience
[en] This book presents three lectures by Allan Hobson, entitled “The William James Lectures on Dream Consciousness”. The three lectures expose the new psychology, the new physiology and the new philosophy that derive from and support the protoconsciousness hypothesis of dreaming. They review in detail many of the studies on sleep and dreaming conducted since the days of Sigmund Freud. Following the lectures are commentaries written by scholars whose expertise covers a wide range of scientific disciplines including, but not limited to, philosophy, psychology, neurology, neuropsychology, cognitive science, biology, and animal sciences. The commentaries each answer a specific question in relation to Hobson’s lectures and his premise that dreaming is an altered state of consciousness. Capitalizing on a vast amount of data, the lectures and commentaries provide undisputed evidence that sleep consists of a well-organized sequence of subtly orchestrated brain states that undoubtedly play a crucial function in the maintenance of normal brain functions. These functions include both basic homeostatic processes necessary to keep the organism alive as well as the highest cognitive functions including perception, decision making, learning and consciousness.
Researchers ; Professionals ; Students
http://hdl.handle.net/10993/3442
10.1007/978-3-319-07296-8

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