Reference : Women with elevated food addiction symptoms show accelerated reactions, but no impair...
Scientific journals : Article
Social & behavioral sciences, psychology : Animal psychology, ethology & psychobiology
Social & behavioral sciences, psychology : Neurosciences & behavior
Social & behavioral sciences, psychology : Theoretical & cognitive psychology
Social & behavioral sciences, psychology : Treatment & clinical psychology
Human health sciences : Psychiatry
http://hdl.handle.net/10993/3440
Women with elevated food addiction symptoms show accelerated reactions, but no impaired inhibitory control, in response to pictures of high-calorie food-cues.
English
Meule, Adrian [Department of Psychology, University of Würzburg, Germany]
Lutz, Annika mailto [University of Luxembourg > Faculty of Language and Literature, Humanities, Arts and Education (FLSHASE) > Integrative Research Unit: Social and Individual Development (INSIDE) >]
Vögele, Claus mailto [University of Luxembourg > Faculty of Language and Literature, Humanities, Arts and Education (FLSHASE) > Integrative Research Unit: Social and Individual Development (INSIDE) >]
Kübler, Andrea [Department of Psychology, University of Würzburg, Germany]
2012
Eating Behaviors
Pergamon
13
4
423-428
Yes (verified by ORBilu)
International
1471-0153
New York
NY
[en] food addiction ; food-cues ; behavioral inhibition ; impulsivity
[en] Addictive behaviors are accompanied by a lack of inhibitory control, specifically when individuals are confronted with substance-related cues. Thus, we expected women with symptoms of food addiction to be impaired in inhibitory control, when confronted with palatable, high-calorie food-cues. Female college students (N = 50) where divided in low and high food addiction groups based on the symptom count of the Yale Food Addiction Scale. Participants performed a Go/No-Go-task with high-calorie food-cues or neutral pictures presented behind the targets. Self-reported impulsivity was also assessed. The high food addiction group had faster reaction times in response to food-cues as compared to neutral cues and reported higher attentional impulsivity than the low food addiction group. Commission and omission errors did not differ between groups or picture types. Hence, women with food addiction symptoms reported higher attentional impulsivity and reacted faster in response to food-cues, although neither increased self-reported motor impulsivity nor impaired behavioral inhibition were found. Food addiction symptoms seem to be related to attentional aspects of impulsivity but not other facets of impulsivity.
Researchers ; Students
http://hdl.handle.net/10993/3440
10.1016/j.eatbeh.2012.08.001

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