Reference : How does research evaluation impact educational research? Exploring intended and unin...
Scientific journals : Article
Social & behavioral sciences, psychology : Sociology & social sciences
Social & behavioral sciences, psychology : Education & instruction
Educational Sciences
http://hdl.handle.net/10993/31849
How does research evaluation impact educational research? Exploring intended and unintended consequences of research assessment in the United Kingdom, 1986–2014
English
Marques, Marcelo mailto [University of Luxembourg > Faculty of Language and Literature, Humanities, Arts and Education (FLSHASE) > Education, Culture, Cognition and Society (ECCS) >]
Powell, Justin J W mailto [University of Luxembourg > Faculty of Language and Literature, Humanities, Arts and Education (FLSHASE) > Education, Culture, Cognition and Society (ECCS) >]
Zapp, Mike mailto [University of Luxembourg > Faculty of Language and Literature, Humanities, Arts and Education (FLSHASE) > Education, Culture, Cognition and Society (ECCS) >]
Biesta, Gert [Brunel University London]
In press
European Educational Research Journal
Yes (verified by ORBilu)
International
1474-9041
[en] research evaluation ; research assessment ; Research Excellence Framework ; UK ; educational research ; higher education
[en] Research evaluation systems in many countries aim to improve the quality of higher education. Among the first such systems, the UK's Research Assessment Exercise (RAE) from 1986 is now the Research Excellence Framework (REF). Highly-institutionalized, it holds research(ers) accountable. While studies describe the effects at different levels, this longitudinal analysis examines the gradual institutionalization and (un)intended consequences from 1986 to 2014. First, we analyze historically RAE/REF's rational, formalization, standardization, and transparency, framing it as a strong research evaluation system. Second, we locate the multidisciplinary field of education, analyzing submission behavior (staff, outputs, funding) of Departments of Education over time. We find: decreases in submitted staff; the research article as preferred publication format; the rise of quantitative analysis; and high and stable concentration of funding among few Departments. Policy instruments invoke varied responses, wit such reactivity shown by the increasing selectivity of submitted staff as a form of reverse engineering and the research article as the preferred output as a self-fulfilling prophecy. The funding concentration manifests an intended consequence, facilitating greater disparities between Departments of Education. These findings emphasize how research assessment impacts the structural organization and cognitive development of educational research in the UK.
Education, Culture, Cognition & Society (ECCS) > Institute of Education & Society (InES)
University of Luxembourg - UL
Researchers ; Professionals ; Students ; General public
http://hdl.handle.net/10993/31849
journals.sagepub.com/home/eer

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