Reference : Can the distinction between intentional and unintentional interference control help d...
Scientific journals : Article
Social & behavioral sciences, psychology : Treatment & clinical psychology
http://hdl.handle.net/10993/29700
Can the distinction between intentional and unintentional interference control help differentiate varieties of impulsivity?
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Gay, Philippe []
Courvoisier, D. S. [Division of Clinical Epidemiology, HUG, University of Geneva, Switzerland]
Billieux, Joël mailto [University of Luxembourg > Faculty of Language and Literature, Humanities, Arts and Education (FLSHASE) > Integrative Research Unit: Social and Individual Development (INSIDE)]
Rochat, Lucien [Cognitive Psychopathology and Neuropsychology Unit, Department of Psychology, University of Geneva, Boulevard du Pont d'Arve 40, CH-1205 Geneva, Switzerland]
Schmidt, Ralph Erich [Swiss Center for Affective Sciences, University of Geneva, Rue des Battoirs 7, CH-1205 Geneva, Switzerland, Cognitive Psychopathology and Neuropsychology Unit, Department of Psychology, University of Geneva, Boulevard du Pont d'Arve 40, CH-1205 Geneva, Switzerland]
Van der Linden, Martial []
2010
Journal of Research in Personality
44
1
46-52
Yes (verified by ORBilu)
International
00926566
[en] Directed-forgetting ; Impulsivity ; Inhibition ; Intentional and unintentional control ; Interference
[en] It has recently been shown that perseverance specifically relates to resisting proactive interference [Gay, P., Rochat, L., Billieux, J., d'Acremont, M., & Van der Linden, M. (2008). Heterogeneous inhibition processes involved in different facets of self-reported impulsivity: Evidence from a community sample. Acta Psychologica, 129, 332-339]. The aim of this study was to replicate and extend this finding by investigating the relationships between unintentional control of interference (in a recent-negatives task), intentional control of interference (in a directed-forgetting task), and the four facets of impulsivity. The performance of 71 volunteers indicated that the relevant variables of the two tasks shared very little or no variance. In particular, regression analyses showed that lower perseverance (i.e., higher impulsivity on this facet) predicted more interference-related errors in both tasks and less time dedicated to resolving proactive interference; however, lower perseverance did not predict directed-forgetting cost. Higher urgency predicted higher interference time due to response-conflict. © 2009 Elsevier Inc.
http://hdl.handle.net/10993/29700
10.1016/j.jrp.2009.10.003

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