Reference : Why do you play World of Warcraft? An in-depth exploration of self-reported motivatio...
Scientific journals : Article
Social & behavioral sciences, psychology : Multidisciplinary, general & others
http://hdl.handle.net/10993/29694
Why do you play World of Warcraft? An in-depth exploration of self-reported motivations to play online and in-game behaviours in the virtual world of Azeroth
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Billieux, Joël mailto [University of Luxembourg > Faculty of Language and Literature, Humanities, Arts and Education (FLSHASE) > Integrative Research Unit: Social and Individual Development (INSIDE)]
Van Der Linden, M. [Cognitive Psychopathology and Neuropsychology Unit, Psychology Department, University of Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland, Cognitive Psychopathology Unit, Psychology Department, University of Liège, Liège, Belgium]
Achab, S. [Addictology Division, Department of Mental Health and Psychiatry, Geneva University Hospitals, Geneva, Switzerland, EA 481 Neurosciences Laboratory, Franche-Comté University, Besançon cedex, France]
Khazaal, Y. [Addictology Division, Department of Mental Health and Psychiatry, Geneva University Hospitals, Geneva, Switzerland]
Paraskevopoulos, L. [Cognitive Psychopathology and Neuropsychology Unit, Psychology Department, University of Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland]
Zullino, D. [Addictology Division, Department of Mental Health and Psychiatry, Geneva University Hospitals, Geneva, Switzerland]
Thorens, G. [Addictology Division, Department of Mental Health and Psychiatry, Geneva University Hospitals, Geneva, Switzerland]
2013
Computers in Human Behavior
29
1
103-109
Yes (verified by ORBilu)
International
07475632
[en] Internet addiction ; Longitudinal ; Massively multiplayer online role-playing games ; Motivation ; Virtual worlds ; World of Warcraft ; Role-playing game ; Interactive computer graphics ; Social networking (online) ; Virtual reality ; Human computer interaction
[en] Massively multiplayer online role-playing games (MMORPGs) are video games in which players create an avatar that evolves and interacts with other avatars in a persistent virtual world. Motivations to play MMORPGs are heterogeneous (e.g. achievement, socialisation, immersion in virtual worlds). This study investigates in detail the relationships between self-reported motives and actual in-game behaviours. We recruited a sample of 690 World of Warcraft players (the most popular MMORPG) who agreed to have their avatar monitored for 8 months. Participants completed an initial online survey about their motives to play. Their actual in-game behaviours were measured through the game's official database (the Armory website). Results showed specific associations between motives and in-game behaviours. Moreover, longitudinal analyses revealed that teamwork- and competition-oriented motives are the most accurate predictors of fast progression in the game. In addition, although specific associations exist between problematic use and certain motives (e.g. advancement, escapism), longitudinal analyses showed that high involvement in the game is not necessarily associated with a negative impact upon daily living. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
http://hdl.handle.net/10993/29694
10.1016/j.chb.2012.07.021

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