Reference : Is Dysfunctional Use of the Mobile Phone a Behavioural Addiction? Confronting Symptom...
Scientific journals : Article
Social & behavioral sciences, psychology : Treatment & clinical psychology
http://hdl.handle.net/10993/29641
Is Dysfunctional Use of the Mobile Phone a Behavioural Addiction? Confronting Symptom-Based Versus Process-Based Approaches.
English
Billieux, Joël mailto [University of Luxembourg > Faculty of Language and Literature, Humanities, Arts and Education (FLSHASE) > Integrative Research Unit: Social and Individual Development (INSIDE)]
Philippot, Pierre [> >]
Schmid, Cecile [> >]
Maurage, Pierre [> >]
De Mol, Jan [> >]
Van der Linden, Martial [> >]
2015
Clinical psychology & psychotherapy
22
5
460-8
Yes (verified by ORBilu)
International
1063-3995
1099-0879
England
[en] Adolescent ; Adult ; Behavior, Addictive/diagnosis/psychology ; Cell Phones ; Cross-Sectional Studies ; Female ; Humans ; Male ; Middle Aged ; Young Adult ; Behavioural Addiction ; Case Conceptualization ; Cyber Addiction ; Mobile Phone Addiction ; Mobile Phone Problematic Use ; Transdiagnostic Approach
[en] UNLABELLED: Dysfunctional use of the mobile phone has often been conceptualized as a 'behavioural addiction' that shares most features with drug addictions. In the current article, we challenge the clinical utility of the addiction model as applied to mobile phone overuse. We describe the case of a woman who overuses her mobile phone from two distinct approaches: (1) a symptom-based categorical approach inspired from the addiction model of dysfunctional mobile phone use and (2) a process-based approach resulting from an idiosyncratic clinical case conceptualization. In the case depicted here, the addiction model was shown to lead to standardized and non-relevant treatment, whereas the clinical case conceptualization allowed identification of specific psychological processes that can be targeted with specific, empirically based psychological interventions. This finding highlights that conceptualizing excessive behaviours (e.g., gambling and sex) within the addiction model can be a simplification of an individual's psychological functioning, offering only limited clinical relevance. KEY PRACTITIONER MESSAGE: The addiction model, applied to excessive behaviours (e.g., gambling, sex and Internet-related activities) may lead to non-relevant standardized treatments. Clinical case conceptualization allowed identification of specific psychological processes that can be targeted with specific empirically based psychological interventions. The biomedical model might lead to the simplification of an individual's psychological functioning with limited clinical relevance.
http://hdl.handle.net/10993/29641
10.1002/cpp.1910
Copyright (c) 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

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