Reference : How Math Anxiety relates to Number-Space Associations.
Scientific journals : Article
Social & behavioral sciences, psychology : Theoretical & cognitive psychology
Educational Sciences
http://hdl.handle.net/10993/29148
How Math Anxiety relates to Number-Space Associations.
English
Georges, Carrie mailto [University of Luxembourg > Faculty of Language and Literature, Humanities, Arts and Education (FLSHASE) > Education, Culture, Cognition and Society (ECCS) >]
Hoffmann, Danielle mailto [University of Luxembourg > Faculty of Language and Literature, Humanities, Arts and Education (FLSHASE) > Luxembourg Centre for Educational Testing (LUCET) >]
Schiltz, Christine mailto [University of Luxembourg > Faculty of Language and Literature, Humanities, Arts and Education (FLSHASE) > Education, Culture, Cognition and Society (ECCS) >]
14-Sep-2016
Frontiers in Psychology
Switzerland Frontiers Research Foundation
7
1401
Yes (verified by ORBilu)
International
1664-1078
Pully
Switzerland
[en] math anxiety ; basic number skills ; number-space associations ; SNARC effect ; working memory
[en] Given the considerable prevalence of math anxiety, it is important to identify the factors contributing to it in order to improve mathematical learning. Research on math anxiety typically focusses on the effects of more complex arithmetic skills. Recent evidence, however, suggests that deficits in basic numerical processing and spatial skills also constitute potential risk factors of math anxiety. Given these observations, we determined whether math anxiety also depends on the quality of spatial-numerical associations. Behavioral evidence for a tight link between numerical and spatial representations is given by the SNARC (spatial-numerical association of response codes) effect, characterized by faster left-/right-sided responses for small/large digits respectively in binary classification tasks. We compared the strength of the SNARC effect between high and low math anxious individuals using the classical parity judgment task in addition to evaluating their spatial skills, arithmetic performance, working memory and inhibitory control. Greater math anxiety was significantly associated with stronger spatio-numerical interactions. This finding adds to the recent evidence supporting a link between math anxiety and basic numerical abilities and strengthens the idea that certain characteristics of low-level number processing such as stronger number-space associations constitute a potential risk factor of math anxiety.
Fonds National de la Recherche - FnR
http://hdl.handle.net/10993/29148
10.3389/fpsyg.2016.01401
http://journal.frontiersin.org/article/10.3389/fpsyg.2016.01401/full#h9
FnR ; FNR4641711 > Carrie Georges > > How and why do number-space interactions differ between individuals? > 01/03/2013 > 28/02/2017 > 2013

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