Reference : Cortisol rapidly affects amplitudes of heartbeat-evoked brain potentials - Implicatio...
Scientific journals : Article
Social & behavioral sciences, psychology : Neurosciences & behavior
http://hdl.handle.net/10993/2873
Cortisol rapidly affects amplitudes of heartbeat-evoked brain potentials - Implications for the contribution of stress to an altered perception of physical sensations?
English
Schulz, André mailto [University of Luxembourg > Faculty of Language and Literature, Humanities, Arts and Education (FLSHASE) > Integrative Research Unit: Social and Individual Development (INSIDE) >]
Strelzyk, F. []
Ferreira de Sá, D. S. []
Naumann, E. []
Vögele, Claus mailto [University of Luxembourg > Faculty of Language and Literature, Humanities, Arts and Education (FLSHASE) > Integrative Research Unit: Social and Individual Development (INSIDE) >]
Schächinger, H. []
2013
Psychoneuroendocrinology
Pergamon Press (part of Elsevier Science)
38
11
2691-2698
Yes (verified by ORBilu)
International
0306-4530
1873-3360
Oxford
United Kingdom
[en] Cortisol ; Interoception ; Heartbeat detection ; Heartbeat-evoked potentials ; HPA axis ; Non-genomic mechanism ; Stress ; Symptom perception ; Visceral perception
[en] Little is known about the impact of stress and stress hormones on the processing of visceral-afferent signals. Clinical data suggest that cortisol may lower the threshold for interoceptive stimuli, while a pharmacological administration of cortisol decreases the sensitivity for physical symptoms. To clarify the role of cortisol for the processing of interoceptive signals, we investigated 16 healthy men on two occasions, once during the infusion of 4mg of cortisol and once during the infusion of a placebo substance. Heartbeat-evoked potentials (HEP; derived from resting EEG and ECG, during open and closed eyes), which are psychophysiological indicators for the cortical processing of cardioceptive signals, were measured over 6-min periods once before, and four times after the infusion (1-7, 11-17, 21-27 and 31-37min). We found that HEP amplitudes were higher during open than during closed eyes between 1 and 17min after cortisol infusion. There was no effect of cortisol on heart rate. We conclude that cortisol may rapidly modulate the cortical processing of cardioceptive neural signals. These results may have relevance for the effects of stress on the development and maintenance of psychosomatic symptoms.
Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG)
Researchers ; Professionals ; Students
http://hdl.handle.net/10993/2873
10.1016/j.psyneuen.2013.06.027

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