Reference : Testing persistence of cohort effects in the epidemiology of suicide: an age-period-c...
Scientific journals : Article
Social & behavioral sciences, psychology : Sociology & social sciences
Social & behavioral sciences, psychology : Multidisciplinary, general & others
http://hdl.handle.net/10993/28088
Testing persistence of cohort effects in the epidemiology of suicide: an age-period-cohort hysteresis model
English
Chauvel, Louis mailto [University of Luxembourg > Faculty of Language and Literature, Humanities, Arts and Education (FLSHASE) > Integrative Research Unit: Social and Individual Development (INSIDE) >]
Leist, Anja mailto [University of Luxembourg > Faculty of Language and Literature, Humanities, Arts and Education (FLSHASE) > Integrative Research Unit: Social and Individual Development (INSIDE) >]
Ponomarenko, Valentina mailto [University of Luxembourg > Faculty of Language and Literature, Humanities, Arts and Education (FLSHASE) > Integrative Research Unit: Social and Individual Development (INSIDE) >]
21-Jul-2016
PLoS ONE
Public Library of Science
Yes (verified by ORBilu)
1932-6203
San Franscisco
CA
[en] age-period-cohort models ; cohort effects ; research methods ; suicide ; scarring effect ; cohort effect stability ; cumulative disadvantage
[en] Birth cohort effects in suicide rates are well established, but to date there is no methodological approach or framework to test the temporal stability of these effects. We use the APC-Detrended (APCD) model to robustly estimate intensity of cohort effects identifying non-linear trends (or ‘detrended’ fluctuations) in suicide rates. The new APC-Hysteresis (APCH) model tests temporal stability of cohort effects. Analysing suicide rates in 25 WHO countries (periods 1970–74 to 2005–09; ages 20–24 to 70–79) with the APCD method, we find that country-specific birth cohort membership plays an important role in suicide rates. Among 25 countries, we detect 12 nations that show deep contrasts among cohort-specific suicide rates including Italy, Australia and the United States. The APCH method shows that cohort fluctuations are not stable across the life course but decline in Spain, France and Australia, whereas they remain stable in Italy, the United Kingdom and the Netherlands. We discuss the Spanish case with elevated suicide mortality of cohorts born 1965-1975 which declines with age, and the opposite case of the United States, where the identified cohort effects of those born around 1960 increase smoothly, but statistically significant across the life course.
Integrative Research Unit: Social and Individual Development (INSIDE) > PEARL Institute for Research on Socio-Economic Inequality (IRSEI)
Fonds National de la Recherche - FnR
http://hdl.handle.net/10993/28088
10.1371/journal.pone.0158538

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