Reference : High-fidelity spherical cholesteric liquid crystal Bragg reflectors generating unclon...
Scientific journals : Article
Physical, chemical, mathematical & earth Sciences : Chemistry
Computational Sciences
http://hdl.handle.net/10993/27540
High-fidelity spherical cholesteric liquid crystal Bragg reflectors generating unclonable patterns for secure authentication
English
Geng, Yong mailto [University of Luxembourg > Faculty of Science, Technology and Communication (FSTC) > Physics and Materials Science Research Unit >]
Noh, Junghyun mailto [University of Luxembourg > Faculty of Science, Technology and Communication (FSTC) > Physics and Materials Science Research Unit >]
Drevensek-Olenik, Irena []
Rupp, Romano []
Lenzini, Gabriele mailto [University of Luxembourg > Interdisciplinary Centre for Security, Reliability and Trust (SNT) > >]
Lagerwall, Jan mailto [University of Luxembourg > Faculty of Science, Technology and Communication (FSTC) > Physics and Materials Science Research Unit >]
27-Mar-2016
Scientific Reports
Nature Publishing Group
6
26840
Scientific Reports
1-8
Yes (verified by ORBilu)
International
2045-2322
London
United Kingdom
[en] Cholesteric Liquid Crystal ; Physical Unclonable Functions
[en] Monodisperse cholesteric liquid crystal microspheres exhibit spherically symmetric Bragg reflection, generating, via photonic cross communication, dynamically tuneable multi-coloured patterns. These patterns, uniquely defined by the particular sphere arrangement, could render cholesteric microspheres very useful in countless security applications, as tags to identify and authenticate their carriers, mainly physical objects or persons. However, the optical quality of the cholesteric droplets studied so far is unsatisfactory, especially after polymerisation, a step required for obtaining durable samples that can be used for object identification. We show that a transition from droplets to shells solves all key problems, giving rise to sharp patterns and excellent optical quality even after polymerisation, the polymerised shells sustaining considerable mechanical deformation. Moreover, we demonstrate that, counter to prior expectation, cross communication takes place even between non-identical shells. This opens additional communication channels that add significantly to the complexity and unique character of the generated patterns.
University of Luxembourg and Interdisciplinary Center for Security, Reliability and Trust
European Resarch Council ; University of Luxembourg - UL
Researchers ; Professionals
http://hdl.handle.net/10993/27540
10.1038/srep26840
http://www.nature.com/articles/srep26840
H2020 ; 648763 - INTERACT - Intelligent Non-woven Textiles and Elastomeric Responsive materials by Advancing liquid Crystal Technology

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Geng et al 2016 345.pdfSupporting information1.6 MBView/Open
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Geng et al 2016 506.movSupporting information; movie of mechanical deformation of polymer-stabilized shells2.68 MBView/Open
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Geng et al 2016.movSupporting information; movie of microfluidic shell production2.62 MBView/Open

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