Reference : A review of the recent epidemiological data on the worldwide incidence of type 1 (ins...
Scientific journals : Article
Human health sciences : Multidisciplinary, general & others
http://hdl.handle.net/10993/27230
A review of the recent epidemiological data on the worldwide incidence of type 1 (insulin dependent) diabetes mellitus
English
Karvonen, M. []
Tuomilehto, J. []
Libman, J. []
laporte, Ron []
De Beaufort, Carine mailto [University of Luxembourg > Luxembourg Centre for Systems Biomedicine (LCSB) > >]
1993
Diabetologia
Springer Verlag
36
883-892
Yes (verified by ORBilu)
0012-186X
1432-0428
Berlin
Germany
[en] DIAMOND ; epidemiological data ; worldwide incidence ; type 1 diabetes mellitus ; insulin dependent ; geographical distribution
[en] Nearly 70 registries from more than 40 countries have collected and published incidence data of childhood Type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetes mellitus up to the end of the 1980s. The majority of incidence data comes from regions of high incidence i.e. from Europe and North America. All these published data facilitate the descriptive comparison of incidence and variation of the occurrence of Type 1 diabetes roughly throughout the northern hemisphere. The aim of this paper is to review and compare the most recent epidemiology data on the incidence of Type 1 diabetes among children under the age of 15 years. A clear difference in incidence appeared between northern and southern hemisphere with no countries below the equator having an incidence greater than 15.0 per 100,000. In contrast above the equator the disease is common. Between continents the variation in incidence showed that the lowest incidences were found in Asia, followed by Oceania (Australia and New Zealand), South and North America, and the highest rates were in Europe. The incidence varied from 0.6 per 100,000 in Korea and Mexico to 35.3 per 100,000 in Finland showing prominent worldwide variation in incidence of Type 1 diabetes. The largest intracontinental variation in incidence appeared in Europe, varying from the highest in Finland to the lowest (4.6 per 100,000) in northern Greece. The highest incidence in the world was in northern Europe, but within the continent scale there were some striking exceptions from the overall level of incidence.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)
http://hdl.handle.net/10993/27230

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