Reference : A systematic review on heart rate variability in Bulimia Nervosa
Scientific journals : Article
Social & behavioral sciences, psychology : Neurosciences & behavior
http://hdl.handle.net/10993/23922
A systematic review on heart rate variability in Bulimia Nervosa
English
Peschel, Stephanie K.V. [The Ohio State University, Columbus, USA > Department of Psychology]
Feeling, Nicole R. [The Ohio State University, Columbus, USA > Department of Psychology]
Vögele, Claus mailto [University of Luxembourg > Faculty of Language and Literature, Humanities, Arts and Education (FLSHASE) > Integrative Research Unit: Social and Individual Development (INSIDE) >]
Kaess, Michael [University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany > Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Centre for Psychosocial Medicine]
Thayer, Julian F. [The Ohio State University, Columbus, USA > Department of Psychology]
Koenig, Julian [University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany > Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Centre for Psychosocial Medicine]
2016
Neuroscience & Biobehavioral Reviews
Pergamon Press
63
78-97
Yes (verified by ORBilu)
International
0149-7634
New York
NY
[en] Bulimia nervosa ; Eating disorders ; Heart rate variability ; Autonomic nervous system ; vagal activity
[en] Eating disorders are associated with alterations of the autonomic nervous system (ANS). Heart rate variability (HRV) provides a readily available index of ANS function. While ANS dysfunction indexed by HRV in Anorexia Nervosa has been addressed in previous reviews, here we aimed to review the current evidence on HRV in Bulimia Nervosa (BN). A systematic literature search in Web of Science, PsycInfo, Scopus, and PubMed identified 17 studies reporting HRV in patients with BN. Studies described (i) differences in resting state HRV in patients with BN compared to controls, (ii) alterations in the stress response in BN indexed by HRV, and (iii) treatment effects on HRV in patients with BN. Despite a number of conflicting results, we conclude that BN is characterized by increased resting state vagally-mediated HRV and an impaired stress-response. Intervention-studies suggest that altered ANS-activity in BN is at least partially reversible. Future studies on the complex relation between BN and HRV should investigate the effect of comorbid disorders, subtypes of BN, and mechanisms affecting treatment outcome.
Researchers ; Professionals ; Students
http://hdl.handle.net/10993/23922
10.1016/j.neubiorev.2016.01.012

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