Reference : The OECD and Higher Education Policy: Bureaucratic Politics and the Dynamics of Agend...
Scientific congresses, symposiums and conference proceedings : Unpublished conference
Law, criminology & political science : Political science, public administration & international relations
http://hdl.handle.net/10993/21530
The OECD and Higher Education Policy: Bureaucratic Politics and the Dynamics of Agenda-Setting
English
Harmsen, Robert mailto [University of Luxembourg > Faculty of Language and Literature, Humanities, Arts and Education (FLSHASE) > Identités, Politiques, Sociétés, Espaces (IPSE) >]
Braband, Gangolf mailto [University of Luxembourg > Faculty of Language and Literature, Humanities, Arts and Education (FLSHASE) > Identités, Politiques, Sociétés, Espaces (IPSE) >]
8-Jul-2015
Yes
No
International
22nd International Conference of Europeanists
8-10 July 2015
Council for European Studies
Paris, Sciences-Po
France
[en] The Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) appeared poised, in the late 1990s and early 2000s, to assume a significant role on the international higher education policy landscape. The Paris-based international organisation, deploying its classic mix of governance instruments privileging cross-national comparison and the forging of a shared policy understanding, seemed to be strategically positioning itself in response to the growing internationalisation of the sector. Many in the higher education community, indeed, saw it as one of the major drivers of a neo-liberal agenda. Yet, in recent years, the OECD appears substantially to have withdrawn from the sector. Its flagship AHELO (Advanced Higher Education Learning Outcomes) initiative has failed to progress, while the organisation has also not proven able to sustain a broader portfolio of activities in the area. The present paper seeks to understand this paradoxical retrenchment, using a ‘bureaucratic politics’ approach that focuses on the understanding of organisational structures and processes. Both the organisation’s general policy drift in the higher education area and the more specific case of the apparent failure of AHELO are examined in detail. Lessons are drawn in terms of the dynamics of agenda-setting within the organisation, as well as in relation to the framing of policy issues by wider higher education stakeholder communities at the international level.
Researchers ; Professionals ; Students ; General public
http://hdl.handle.net/10993/21530

File(s) associated to this reference

Fulltext file(s):

FileCommentaryVersionSizeAccess
Limited access
Harmsen Braband - CES OECD Paper final.pdfPublisher postprint142.44 kBRequest a copy

Bookmark and Share SFX Query

All documents in ORBilu are protected by a user license.