Reference : Short-term food deprivation increases amplitudes of heartbeat-evoked potentials
Scientific journals : Article
Social & behavioral sciences, psychology : Neurosciences & behavior
http://hdl.handle.net/10993/18576
Short-term food deprivation increases amplitudes of heartbeat-evoked potentials
English
Schulz, André mailto [University of Luxembourg > Faculty of Language and Literature, Humanities, Arts and Education (FLSHASE) > Integrative Research Unit: Social and Individual Development (INSIDE) >]
Ferreira de Sá, D. S. []
Dierolf, A. []
Lutz, Annika mailto [University of Luxembourg > Faculty of Language and Literature, Humanities, Arts and Education (FLSHASE) > Integrative Research Unit: Social and Individual Development (INSIDE) >]
Van Dyck, Zoé mailto [University of Luxembourg > Faculty of Language and Literature, Humanities, Arts and Education (FLSHASE) > Integrative Research Unit: Social and Individual Development (INSIDE) >]
Vögele, Claus mailto [University of Luxembourg > Faculty of Language and Literature, Humanities, Arts and Education (FLSHASE) > Integrative Research Unit: Social and Individual Development (INSIDE) >]
Schächinger, H. []
2015
Psychophysiology
Cambridge University Press
52
5
695-703
Yes (verified by ORBilu)
International
0048-5772
New York
NY
[en] Nutritional state, i.e. fasting or non-fasting, may affect the processing of interoceptive
signals, but mechanisms underlying this effect remain unclear. We investigated 16 healthy
women on two separate days: when satiated (standardized food intake) and after an 18 h food
deprivation period. On both days, heartbeat-evoked potentials (HEPs) and cardiac and ANS
activation indices (heart rate, nLF HRV) were assessed. The HEP is an EEG pattern that is
considered an index of cortical representation of afferent cardiovascular signals. Average
HEP activity (R-wave +455-595 ms) was enhanced during food deprivation compared to
normal food intake. Cardiac activation did not differ between nutritional conditions. Our
results indicate that short-term food deprivation amplifies an electrophysiological correlate of
the cortical representation of visceral-afferent signals originating from the cardiovascular
system. This effect could not be attributed to increased cardiac activation, as estimated by
heart rate and nLF HRV, after food deprivation.
http://hdl.handle.net/10993/18576
10.1111/psyp.12388

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