Reference : Bilingualism Enriches the Poor: Enhanced Cognitive Control in Low-Income Minority Ch...
Scientific congresses, symposiums and conference proceedings : Unpublished conference
Social & behavioral sciences, psychology : Theoretical & cognitive psychology
http://hdl.handle.net/10993/17607
Bilingualism Enriches the Poor: Enhanced Cognitive Control in Low-Income Minority Children
English
Engel de Abreu, Pascale mailto [University of Luxembourg > Faculty of Language and Literature, Humanities, Arts and Education (FLSHASE) > Education, Culture, Cognition and Society (ECCS) >]
Cruz-Santos, Anabela []
Tourinho, Carlos []
Martin, Romain mailto [University of Luxembourg > Faculty of Language and Literature, Humanities, Arts and Education (FLSHASE) > Education, Culture, Cognition and Society (ECCS) >]
Bialystok, Ellen []
16-Jul-2014
Yes
No
International
13th International Congress for the Study of Child Language
14.07.2014-18.07.2014
IASCL
Amsterdam
Netherlands
[en] Mulilingualism ; cognitive control ; executive functions ; working memory ; poverty ; language minority children ; cognitive advantage
[en] Research question: Living in poverty is often accompanied by conditions that can negatively
influence cognitive development (Noble, Norman, & Farah, 2005). Is it possible that being
bilingual might counteract these effects? This study explores whether the cognitive
advantage associated with bilingualism in executive functioning (Bialystok, Craik, Green, &
Gollan, 2009) extends to young immigrant children challenged by poverty and, if it does,
which specific processes are most affected.
Methods: 80 second graders from low-income families participated in the study. Half of the
children were first or second generation immigrants to Luxembourg, originally from
Northern Portugal, who spoke both Luxembourgish and Portuguese on a daily basis. The
other matched half of children lived in Northern Portugal and spoke only Portuguese.
Children completed measures of vocabulary and visuo-spatial tests of working memory,
abstract reasoning, selective attention, and interference suppression.
Results: Two broad cognitive factors of executive functioning—representation (abstract
reasoning and working memory) and control (selective attention and interference
University of Luxembourg: FLSHASE
Fonds National de la Recherche - FnR
Researchers
http://hdl.handle.net/10993/17607
Part of symposium "Cognitive Advantages in Bilingual Children"

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