Reference : The Genetics Lab - A new Computer-Based Problem Solving Scenario to assess Intelligence
Scientific congresses, symposiums and conference proceedings : Unpublished conference
Social & behavioral sciences, psychology : Education & instruction
http://hdl.handle.net/10993/13113
The Genetics Lab - A new Computer-Based Problem Solving Scenario to assess Intelligence
English
Sonnleitner, Philipp mailto [University of Luxembourg > Faculty of Language and Literature, Humanities, Arts and Education (FLSHASE) > Educational Measurement and Applied Cognitive Science (EMACS) >]
Brunner, Martin []
Keller, Ulrich mailto [University of Luxembourg > Faculty of Language and Literature, Humanities, Arts and Education (FLSHASE) > Educational Measurement and Applied Cognitive Science (EMACS) >]
Martin, Romain mailto [University of Luxembourg > Faculty of Language and Literature, Humanities, Arts and Education (FLSHASE) > Educational Measurement and Applied Cognitive Science (EMACS) >]
Latour Thibaud []
2011
Yes
International
11th European Conference on Psychological Assessment
from 31-08-2011 to 03-09-2011
Riga
Latvia
[en] Assessments of intelligence by means of paper-pencil tests faced several critiques that point to their lack of face validity, insufficient coverage of the definition of intelligence, their sensitivity to the emotional state of the test taker, and the danger of getting outdated. The present paper discusses to what extent these limitations can be overcome by computer-based problem solving scenarios–so-called microworlds. Generally speaking, microworlds are supposed to be highly accepted by test takers, to provide process measures by directly tracing problem solving behavior, and to realize game-like characteristics that may increase test motivation and reduce test anxiety. To capitalize on these potential advantages, we developed the microworld Genetics Lab that was completed by a large, heterogeneous sample of more than 600 Luxembourgish students. Performance scores were derived for students’ problem solving strategies as well as their mental problem representations–important cognitive data which are not accessible with typical paper-pencil tests. Analyses of the psychometric characteristics of the Genetics Lab empirically underscored the construct validity for the derived performance scores. For example, process oriented measures of strategy use were found to possess discriminant validity with respect to grades. Further, acceptance and induced test anxiety of the Genetics lab was explored relative to a paper-pencil measure of intelligence. Our results show that the Genetics Lab is a reliable and valid assessment instrument and emphasize the benefits of using microworlds for assessing intelligence.
http://hdl.handle.net/10993/13113

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