Reference : Do economic recessions during early and mid-adulthood influence cognitive function in...
Scientific journals : Article
Social & behavioral sciences, psychology : Sociology & social sciences
Human health sciences : Public health, health care sciences & services
Human health sciences : Multidisciplinary, general & others
http://hdl.handle.net/10993/12402
Do economic recessions during early and mid-adulthood influence cognitive function in older age?
English
Leist, Anja mailto [University of Luxembourg > Faculty of Language and Literature, Humanities, Arts and Education (FLSHASE) > Integrative Research Unit: Social and Individual Development (INSIDE) >]
Hessel, Philipp [London School of Economics and Political Science, London, United Kingdom > Department of Social Policy, LSE Health and Social Care]
Avendano, Mauricio [London School of Economics and Political Science, London, United Kingdom > Department of Social Policy, LSE Health and Social Care]
Jan-2014
Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health
British Medical Association
68
151-158
Yes (verified by ORBilu)
International
0141-7681
London
United Kingdom
[en] cognitive function ; older adults ; employment ; elderly ; economic recessions ; SHARE ; cognitive reserve ; unemployment ; life course epidemiology
[en] Background. Fluctuations in the national economy shape labour market opportunities and outcomes, which in turn may influence the accumulation of cognitive reserve. This study examines whether economic recessions experienced in early and mid-adulthood are associated with later-life cognitive function.

Method. Data came from 12,020 respondents in 11 countries participating in the Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe (SHARE). Cognitive assessments in 2004/5 and 2006/7 were linked to complete work histories retrospectively collected in 2008/9, and to historical annual data on fluctuations in Gross Domestic Product (GDP) per capita for each country. Controlling for confounders, we assessed whether recessions experienced at ages 25-34, 35-44 and 45-49 were associated with cognitive function at ages 50-74.

Results. Among men, each additional recession at ages 45-49 was associated with worse cognitive function at ages 50-74 (b = -0.06, Confidence Interval [CI] -0.11, -0.01). Among women, each additional recession at ages 25-44 was associated with worse cognitive function at ages 50-74 (b25-34 = -0.03, CI -0.04, -0.01; b35-44= -0.02, CI -0.04, -0.00). Among men, recessions at ages 45-49 influenced risk of being laid-off, whereas among women, recessions at ages 25-44 led to working part-time and higher likelihood of downward occupational mobility, which were all predictors of worse later-life cognitive function.

Conclusions. Recessions at ages 45-49 among men and 25-44 among women are associated with later-life cognitive function, possibly via more unfavourable labour market trajectories. If replicated in future studies, findings may indicate that policies that ameliorate the impact of recessions on labour market outcomes may promote later-life cognitive function.
Fonds National de la Recherche - FnR
http://hdl.handle.net/10993/12402
10.1136/jech-2013-202843
http://jech.bmj.com/content/early/2013/11/05/jech-2013-202843

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