Reference : Increased residual disability among post-stroke survivors, and differences in the rep...
Scientific journals : Article
Social & behavioral sciences, psychology : Sociology & social sciences
Human health sciences : Public health, health care sciences & services
http://hdl.handle.net/10993/1132
Increased residual disability among post-stroke survivors, and differences in the repercussions between informal caregivers.
English
Baumann, Michèle mailto [University of Luxembourg > Faculty of Language and Literature, Humanities, Arts and Education (FLSHASE) > Integrative Research Unit: Social and Individual Development (INSIDE) >]
Lurbe-Puerto, Katia [> >]
2011
Topics in Stroke Rehabilitation
Thomas Land Publishers Incorporated
18
2
162-171
Yes (verified by ORBilu)
International
1074-9357
St Louis
MO
[en] gender ; stroke ; level education ; informal caregivers ; cerebrovascular accident ; repercussions
[en] Purpose: To analyze the associations between increased residual disability among poststroke survivors and the repercussions for their informal caregivers’ lives, taking into account the latter’s gender and education level. Methods: 215 stroke survivors (64.5 years; 55.8% men) were recruited by one neurologist from each of the 22 French regions. Katz Index of Independence in Activities of Daily Living (Katz ADL) was mean 9.3, and 54% still had impairments in “more than two of the six neurological domains” of the American Heart Association Stroke Outcome Classifi cation (AHA.SOC): motor,sensory, vision, affect, cognition, and language. The 215 caregivers (57.8 years; 72.1% women) completed a face-to-face questionnaire concerning their social (8 items), material (4 items), and emotional (8 items) repercussions. Results: Katz ADL and AHA.SOC were significantly related to social repercussions for caregivers. Lack of autonomy among stroke survivors (low Katz ADL) was associated with the material diffi culties of most concern to caregivers: “I needed to move house” (odds ratio [OR] 1.16; 95% CI, 1.07-1.27) and “I cannot go out anymore” (OR 1.29; 95% CI, 1.16-1.44). Being a male caregiver was strongly associated with a feeling of injustice (OR 2.53; 95% CI, 1.07-6.00). A low educational level was linked to an increased feeling of fear (OR 2.61; 95% CI, 1.05-6.51) and a greater feeling of isolation (OR 6.49; 95% CI, 1.20-35.02). Conclusion: Increased dependency post stroke leads to impoverishment in the caregiver’s social relationships. Evaluating the emotional repercussions, particularly for men, is an important aspect of enabling survivors to continue to live at home.Innovative accompaniment and counseling services should be considered.repercussions for their informal caregivers’ lives, taking account of the latter’s gender and education level.
Integrative Research Unit: Social and Individual Development (INSIDE) > Institute for Health and Behaviour
University of Luxembourg - UL
F3R-INS-PFN-060506 > AVC Vivre au GD après acc. cérébral > > BAUMANN Michèle
Researchers ; Professionals ; Students ; General public ; Others
http://hdl.handle.net/10993/1132
10.1310/tsr1802-162
FnR ; F3R-INS-PFN-060506 > AVC Vivre au GD après acc. cérébral > > BAUMANN Michèle

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