References of "Reports"
     in
Bookmark and Share    
See detailStudent case vignettes for the investigation of teachers' tracking decisions
Böhmer, Ines; Hörstermann, Thomas UL; Gräsel, Cornelia et al

Report (in press)

Detailed reference viewed: 78 (8 UL)
Full Text
See detailTax Treaty Arbitration in Luxembourg - National Report
Chaouche, Fatima UL; Pantazatou, Aikaterini UL

Report (in press)

Tax Treaty dispute resolution through the Mutual Assistance Procedure (MAP) is particularly relevant in Luxembourg. Luxembourg has, as of May 2018, 81 Double Tax Convention (henceforth, “DTC”) out of ... [more ▼]

Tax Treaty dispute resolution through the Mutual Assistance Procedure (MAP) is particularly relevant in Luxembourg. Luxembourg has, as of May 2018, 81 Double Tax Convention (henceforth, “DTC”) out of which only 12 provide for arbitration clauses. In contrast, while the Arbitration procedure is also available, it is barely used in practice as the MAP procedure proves to be the most common form of resolution of tax treaty dispute resolutions in Luxembourg. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 42 (5 UL)
Full Text
See detailLa mobilité transfrontalière des travailleurs est-elle une ressource pour la Grande Région?
Pigeron-Piroth, Isabelle UL; Belkacem, Rachid

Report (2018)

La Grande Région est l’un des espaces transfrontaliers les plus concernés par les flux de travail frontalier. Face aux nombreux défis (économiques, démographiques, environnementaux, etc.) auxquels elle se ... [more ▼]

La Grande Région est l’un des espaces transfrontaliers les plus concernés par les flux de travail frontalier. Face aux nombreux défis (économiques, démographiques, environnementaux, etc.) auxquels elle se trouve confrontée, peut-on considérer la mobilité transfrontalière comme une ressource pour les territoires frontaliers ? Telle était la question de départ posée aux différents spécialistes présents lors du Forum Grande Région du 7 juin 2018. Cette table ronde a réuni près de 70 participants issus du monde politique, économique, universitaire, mais également des citoyens intéressés par ces questions. Elle a donné lieu à de nombreux échanges et débats, révélant d’intéressantes pistes de recherche futures. [less ▲]

Full Text
See detailLabour Market Integration of Third-Country Nationals in EU Member States
Petry, Ralph UL; Sommarribas, Adolfo UL; Nienaber, Birte UL

Report (2018)

Luxembourg is characterized by a very specific demographic situation with 47,9% of its resident population being non-Luxembourgish nationals as of 1 January 2018. This particular circumstance makes ... [more ▼]

Luxembourg is characterized by a very specific demographic situation with 47,9% of its resident population being non-Luxembourgish nationals as of 1 January 2018. This particular circumstance makes Luxembourg the EU Member State with the highest share of non-citizens residing on its territory. At the same time, around 85% of the foreign population are citizens of another EU Member State, leading to the fact that third-country nationals constitute only 7,3% of the total resident population of Luxembourg, the lowest share of foreigners coming from a third-country in the European Union. Integration is defined in national legislation as a ‘two-way process by which the foreigners shows their will to participate on a long-term basis to the host society, which, in turn, takes all the necessary measures at the social, economic, political, and cultural levels, to encourage and facilitate this approach. Integration is a task that the State, municipalities and civil society achieve together’. In addition to this legal provision, several strategic documents, most notably the multi-annual national action plan on integration 2018, or PAN integration, published in July 2018, make reference to integration and its definition. The PAN integration provides the framework for the programs and tools favouring the social cohesion of Luxembourgish and non-Luxembourgish nationals and the overall national integration policy by identifying five priority domains, one of which explicitly relates to the reinforcement of employability of non-Luxembourgish nationals. Generally speaking, employment is viewed as a core element of the overall integration process, making both the access to as well as the integration into the Luxembourgish labour market a key element in becoming a part of society. At the same time, this access to and integration into the labour market pose a challenge, particularly to third-country nationals, as the statistics show that their employment rate is lower than that of Luxembourgish nationals or citizens of another EU Member State. Third-country nationals are predominantly occupied in the accommodation and food service activities sector, followed by the administrative and support service activities sector and the wholesale and retail trade; repair of motor vehicles and motorcycles sector. A closer look at the evolution of the sectors employing third-country nationals over the last years, however, indicates that in particular the information and communication technologies sector, the professional, scientific and technical activities sector and the financial and insurance activities sector register the most significant growth rates, leading to a development that seem to indicate a ‘double immigration’ of (highly) skilled migrants on the one hand and less or low skilled migrants in the more traditional economic sectors on the other hand. In regard to the general integration approach as well as the labour market integration policy, this study shows that Luxembourg does have not have a specific policy/strategic document/model in place that only focusses on third-country nationals. All political documents (laws and strategic documents such as the PAN 2010-2014 and the new PAN integration of 2018) and public measures (Welcome and Integration Contract (CAI), linguistic leave, support measures provided by the National Employment Agency (ADEM), measures facilitating school integration, electoral registration campaigns, etc.) are aimed at all foreign nationals without distinguishing between EU nationals and third-country nationals. It is the Immigration Law that provides the legal framework regarding the various grounds of migration for economic purposes. Additionally, the legislator aims to be attractive for certain categories of migrants coming to Luxembourg for economic purposes in order to meet the needs of the country’s economic development (via legislative measures such as the European Blue Card, the ‘investor’ residence permit or the agreement between Luxembourg and Cape Verde). This being said, this study will present examples of practices that have been identified as good practices in the context of the topic of labour market integration of third-country nationals, despite the fact that they, for the most part, do not fit 100% into the pre-set structure of the study template at hand. In section 2.2, three Member State measure are presented, the first of which is the linguistic leave, a specific form of additional special leave that is accessible for salaried and independent workers of all nationalities, resident or non-resident, to learn or perfect the command of the Luxembourgish language. This legislative measure was introduced by law in 2009 with the intention to facilitate the integration of the beneficiaries into society through the labour market. The second measure is the AMIF-project ‘InSitu JOBS’ by the non-governmental organisation CLAE asbl (with co-financing from the Luxembourgish State). This project, which ended in April 2018 was targeted at third-country nationals within the scope of this study as well as at beneficiaries of international protection by providing them information and counselling in the context of access and integration into the Luxembourgish labour market. The third measure was also an AMIF-project and consists of a practical guide that was developed and drafted by IMS Luxembourg, a network of Luxembourgish companies, in order to provide information on how to hire and integrate third-country nationals. As for the private sector measures in section 2.3. of this study, research of secondary resources as well as consultations with various relevant stakeholders proved to be rather difficult in terms of finding private sector initiatives that specifically target at supporting or facilitating the labour market integration of third-country nationals within the scope of this study. Two measures were selected in this context, the first consisting of a specific recruitment method (simulation-based recruitment method) by a large international company which allows them to evaluate various different profiles of people that are not necessarily detectable through the classic CV-based recruitment methods. The second measure is a business guide developed by the American Chamber of Commerce Luxembourg and aims to promote and facilitate the establishment of new business in Luxembourg by providing information on everything that entrepreneurs and international companies need to know in this context. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 8 (2 UL)
Full Text
See detailRapport annuel sur les migrations et l'asile (2017)
Jacobs, Sarah UL; Adao Do Carmo, Kelly UL; Petry, David UL et al

Report (2018)

The present report provides an overview of the main developments and debates in relation to migration and asylum in Luxembourg in 2017. The number of people applying for international protection remained ... [more ▼]

The present report provides an overview of the main developments and debates in relation to migration and asylum in Luxembourg in 2017. The number of people applying for international protection remained high in 2017 (2.322 applications) compared to the levels registered pre- ‘migration crisis’ (1.091 in 2014). However, the number of registrations remained relatively stable if compared to the two preceding years (2.447 in 2015 and 2.035 in 2016). This relative stability in numbers also reflected on the general public and policy debate in the field of migration and asylum. Since 2016, its focus has continuously shifted from an ‘emergency’ discourse axed on the implementation of reception measures and conditions towards discussions on longer-term integration measures and policies. In this regard, the newly introduced Guided Integration Trail (parcours d’intégration accompagné - PIA) can be considered a flagship project of OLAI, the national agency responsible for the reception and integration of foreigners. This multidisciplinary package of measures aims to empower applicants and beneficiaries of international protection and to support them in developing their life project. The trail, compulsory for all adult applicants for international protection, consists of a linguistic component and a civic component and is split into three phases. Although increasing housing capacities for the reception of applicants for international protection was high on national authorities’ agenda, housing remained a challenging aspect of the asylum system and triggered debate on a national scale. Alongside access to training, problems related to housing were among the issues most frequently raised by applicants for international protection in 2017. The lack of affordable housing on the private market, an increasing number of family reunifications as well as the increasing number of beneficiaries and persons who have been issued a return decision who remain housed in structures of OLAI were all identified as interplaying barriers for finding available accommodation for applicants for international protection. The difficulties with the construction of modular housing structures also persisted in 2017. A certain reticence of the population towards the construction of these so-called ‘container villages, planned in response to the increasing influx that started in August 2015, was visible in the appeals introduced into Luxembourg’s First Instance Administrative Courts to annul the land-use plans related to the projects. Living conditions in the various reception facilities were also one of the subjects of discussion in 2017. This included a debate on the (lack of) kitchen infrastructure in reception facilities and the varying systems for provision of food, the types of food available, as well as the availability of internet. As an answer to the resurgence of an increased influx of applicants of international protection from the Western Balkans in early 2017, a new ‘ultra-accelerated procedure’ was put in place for applicants of international protection stemming from the Western Balkans. According to the state authorities, the ultra-accelerated procedure was set up to take pressure off the reception facilities, but also as a deterrent to avoid creating false hopes for long-term stay. In April 2017, a ‘semi-open return structure’ (Structure d’hébergement d’urgence au Kirchberg – SHUK) was put in place, from which people are transferred to states applying the Dublin regulation. Due to home custody (assignation à résidence), the SHUK is considered to be an alternative to detention by national authorities. The newly created structure as well as the related conditions for assignment, were nevertheless criticised by civil society. The outcry among civil society was equally high during and after the adoption the Law of 8 March 2017, which endorses the extension of the permitted period of detention of adults or families with children from 72 hours to 7 days, in order to improve the organisation of the return and ensures that it is carried out successfully. A commission in charge of determining the best interests of unaccompanied minors applying for international protection was decided at the end of 2017. The commission is in charge of carrying out individual assessments regarding the best interest of the child with the aim of delivering an authorisation of stay or a return decision. Among the elements taken into consideration when the best interest of the child is evaluated in the context of a potential return decision is information provided by the International Organization for Migration (IOM). The latter made an agreement with the Directorate of Immigration in 2017 to search for the parents of UAMs in the country of origin. With the focus of debates having slowly shifted towards long-term integration issues, the Council of Government also approved the elaboration of a new multiannual national action plan on integration. The plan will be based on two axes: (1) the reception and follow-up of applicants for international protection and (2) the integration of Luxembourg’s non-Luxembourgish residents. Luxembourg’s National Employment Agency (ADEM) set up a “cellule BPI” (beneficiaries of international protection cell) in its Employer Service in early 2017. This cell provides employers with information regarding job applications and evaluations of the competences of beneficiaries of international protection. A new law on the Luxembourgish nationality entered into force on 1 April 2017. Given the particular demographic situation of Luxembourg characterised by a significant increase in the total population and a decrease in the proportion of Luxembourgers in the total population, the reform intends to promote the societal and political integration of non-Luxembourgish citizens and to strengthen cohesion within the national community. The main changes introduced by the law include a decreased length of residence requirement for naturalisation (from 7 to 5 years), the right of birthplace (jus soli) of the first generation, a simplified way of acquiring Luxembourgish nationality by ‘option’, as well as new scenarios to avoid cases of statelessness. The law maintains previous linguistic requirements but makes some adjustments in order to prevent the language condition from becoming an insurmountable obstacle. Ahead of the local elections held on 8 October 2017, the Ministry of Family, Integration and the Greater Region launched a national information and awareness-raising campaign titled “Je peux voter” (I can vote) in January 2017. This campaign aimed to motivate Luxembourg’s foreign population to register on the electoral roll for the local elections. The government’s intention to legislate face concealment was arguably one of the most debated topics in the field related to community life and integration in the broader sense, both in parliament as well as in the media and public sphere. Bill n°7179 aims to modify article 563 of the Penal Code and to create the prohibition of face concealment in certain public spaces. The bill defines face concealment as the action of covering part of or all of the face in a way of rendering the identification of the person impossible and provides a wide variety of examples, such as the wearing of a motor cycle helmet, a balaclava or a full-face veil. Opposing views among stakeholders, whether political parties, public institutions, civil society or the media, emerged with regard to the necessity to legislate in the matter and if so, on the basis of which grounds and to what extent. The phenomenon of migration has also led to a more heterogeneous population in Luxembourg’s schools. To face this situation, the education authorities continued to diversify Luxembourg’s offer in education and training, creating for instance a bigger offer for youngsters and adults who do not master any of Luxembourg’s vehicular languages, offering more alphabetisation courses or basic instruction courses. The Minister for National Education continued to develop and adapt the school offer to the increased heterogeneity by increasing the international and European school offer, introducing of a new mediation service and putting in place a plurilingual education programme. In the area of legal migration, the most significant changes concerned admission policies of specific categories of third-country nationals. In this respect, bill n°7188 mainly aims to transpose Directive (EU) 2016/801 of the European Parliament and the Council of 11 May 2016 on the conditions of entry and residence of third-country nationals for the purposes of research, studies, training, voluntary service, pupil exchange schemes or educational projects and au pairing. The directive aims to make the European Union a world centre of excellence for studies and training, while favouring contacts between people and favouring their mobility, these two being important elements of the European Union’s external policy. Bill N°7188 intends to facilitate and simplify the procedures for intra-European mobility of TCN researchers and students. Moreover, the proposed changes include incentive mechanisms to retain students and researchers. To this end, it proposes that students and researchers, once they have completed their studies/research, can be issued a residence permit for “private reasons” for a duration of 9 months at most in view of finding employment or creating a business. Finally, bill n°7188 also foresees provisions to regulate the family reunification of a researcher staying in Luxembourg in the context of short- and long-term mobility with his/her nuclear family. The legislator furthermore transposed Directive 2014/36 on seasonal workers and Directive 2014/66 on temporary intragroup transfer into national law, and adapted Luxembourg’s immigration law to the needs to the economy, by introducing, amongst other things, and authorisation of stay for investors. Organising the admission of stay and the issuance of authorisations of stay was also a key component within the agreement between Luxembourg and Cape Verde on the concerted management of migratory flows and solidary development. Other objectives of the agreement include the promotion of the movement of people, detailing readmission procedures, fighting against irregular migration, strengthening the legal establishment and integration of the concerned nationals, as well as the mobilisation of skills and resources of migrants in favour of solidary development. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 12 (1 UL)
Full Text
See detailAnnual report on migration and asylum (2017)
Jacobs, Sarah UL; Adao Do Carmo, Kelly UL; Petry, David UL et al

Report (2018)

The present report provides an overview of the main developments and debates in relation to migration and asylum in Luxembourg in 2017. The number of people applying for international protection remained ... [more ▼]

The present report provides an overview of the main developments and debates in relation to migration and asylum in Luxembourg in 2017. The number of people applying for international protection remained high in 2017 (2.322 applications) compared to the levels registered pre- ‘migration crisis’ (1.091 in 2014). However, the number of registrations remained relatively stable if compared to the two preceding years (2.447 in 2015 and 2.035 in 2016). This relative stability in numbers also reflected on the general public and policy debate in the field of migration and asylum. Since 2016, its focus has continuously shifted from an ‘emergency’ discourse axed on the implementation of reception measures and conditions towards discussions on longer-term integration measures and policies. In this regard, the newly introduced Guided Integration Trail (parcours d’intégration accompagné - PIA) can be considered a flagship project of OLAI, the national agency responsible for the reception and integration of foreigners. This multidisciplinary package of measures aims to empower applicants and beneficiaries of international protection and to support them in developing their life project. The trail, compulsory for all adult applicants for international protection, consists of a linguistic component and a civic component and is split into three phases. Although increasing housing capacities for the reception of applicants for international protection was high on national authorities’ agenda, housing remained a challenging aspect of the asylum system and triggered debate on a national scale. Alongside access to training, problems related to housing were among the issues most frequently raised by applicants for international protection in 2017. The lack of affordable housing on the private market, an increasing number of family reunifications as well as the increasing number of beneficiaries and persons who have been issued a return decision who remain housed in structures of OLAI were all identified as interplaying barriers for finding available accommodation for applicants for international protection. The difficulties with the construction of modular housing structures also persisted in 2017. A certain reticence of the population towards the construction of these so-called ‘container villages, planned in response to the increasing influx that started in August 2015, was visible in the appeals introduced into Luxembourg’s First Instance Administrative Courts to annul the land-use plans related to the projects. Living conditions in the various reception facilities were also one of the subjects of discussion in 2017. This included a debate on the (lack of) kitchen infrastructure in reception facilities and the varying systems for provision of food, the types of food available, as well as the availability of internet. As an answer to the resurgence of an increased influx of applicants of international protection from the Western Balkans in early 2017, a new ‘ultra-accelerated procedure’ was put in place for applicants of international protection stemming from the Western Balkans. According to the state authorities, the ultra-accelerated procedure was set up to take pressure off the reception facilities, but also as a deterrent to avoid creating false hopes for long-term stay. In April 2017, a ‘semi-open return structure’ (Structure d’hébergement d’urgence au Kirchberg – SHUK) was put in place, from which people are transferred to states applying the Dublin regulation. Due to home custody (assignation à résidence), the SHUK is considered to be an alternative to detention by national authorities. The newly created structure as well as the related conditions for assignment, were nevertheless criticised by civil society. The outcry among civil society was equally high during and after the adoption the Law of 8 March 2017, which endorses the extension of the permitted period of detention of adults or families with children from 72 hours to 7 days, in order to improve the organisation of the return and ensures that it is carried out successfully. A commission in charge of determining the best interests of unaccompanied minors applying for international protection was decided at the end of 2017. The commission is in charge of carrying out individual assessments regarding the best interest of the child with the aim of delivering an authorisation of stay or a return decision. Among the elements taken into consideration when the best interest of the child is evaluated in the context of a potential return decision is information provided by the International Organization for Migration (IOM). The latter made an agreement with the Directorate of Immigration in 2017 to search for the parents of UAMs in the country of origin. With the focus of debates having slowly shifted towards long-term integration issues, the Council of Government also approved the elaboration of a new multiannual national action plan on integration. The plan will be based on two axes: (1) the reception and follow-up of applicants for international protection and (2) the integration of Luxembourg’s non-Luxembourgish residents. Luxembourg’s National Employment Agency (ADEM) set up a “cellule BPI” (beneficiaries of international protection cell) in its Employer Service in early 2017. This cell provides employers with information regarding job applications and evaluations of the competences of beneficiaries of international protection. A new law on the Luxembourgish nationality entered into force on 1 April 2017. Given the particular demographic situation of Luxembourg characterised by a significant increase in the total population and a decrease in the proportion of Luxembourgers in the total population, the reform intends to promote the societal and political integration of non-Luxembourgish citizens and to strengthen cohesion within the national community. The main changes introduced by the law include a decreased length of residence requirement for naturalisation (from 7 to 5 years), the right of birthplace (jus soli) of the first generation, a simplified way of acquiring Luxembourgish nationality by ‘option’, as well as new scenarios to avoid cases of statelessness. The law maintains previous linguistic requirements but makes some adjustments in order to prevent the language condition from becoming an insurmountable obstacle. Ahead of the local elections held on 8 October 2017, the Ministry of Family, Integration and the Greater Region launched a national information and awareness-raising campaign titled “Je peux voter” (I can vote) in January 2017. This campaign aimed to motivate Luxembourg’s foreign population to register on the electoral roll for the local elections. The government’s intention to legislate face concealment was arguably one of the most debated topics in the field related to community life and integration in the broader sense, both in parliament as well as in the media and public sphere. Bill n°7179 aims to modify article 563 of the Penal Code and to create the prohibition of face concealment in certain public spaces. The bill defines face concealment as the action of covering part of or all of the face in a way of rendering the identification of the person impossible and provides a wide variety of examples, such as the wearing of a motor cycle helmet, a balaclava or a full-face veil. Opposing views among stakeholders, whether political parties, public institutions, civil society or the media, emerged with regard to the necessity to legislate in the matter and if so, on the basis of which grounds and to what extent. The phenomenon of migration has also led to a more heterogeneous population in Luxembourg’s schools. To face this situation, the education authorities continued to diversify Luxembourg’s offer in education and training, creating for instance a bigger offer for youngsters and adults who do not master any of Luxembourg’s vehicular languages, offering more alphabetisation courses or basic instruction courses. The Minister for National Education continued to develop and adapt the school offer to the increased heterogeneity by increasing the international and European school offer, introducing of a new mediation service and putting in place a plurilingual education programme. In the area of legal migration, the most significant changes concerned admission policies of specific categories of third-country nationals. In this respect, bill n°7188 mainly aims to transpose Directive (EU) 2016/801 of the European Parliament and the Council of 11 May 2016 on the conditions of entry and residence of third-country nationals for the purposes of research, studies, training, voluntary service, pupil exchange schemes or educational projects and au pairing. The directive aims to make the European Union a world centre of excellence for studies and training, while favouring contacts between people and favouring their mobility, these two being important elements of the European Union’s external policy. Bill N°7188 intends to facilitate and simplify the procedures for intra-European mobility of TCN researchers and students. Moreover, the proposed changes include incentive mechanisms to retain students and researchers. To this end, it proposes that students and researchers, once they have completed their studies/research, can be issued a residence permit for “private reasons” for a duration of 9 months at most in view of finding employment or creating a business. Finally, bill n°7188 also foresees provisions to regulate the family reunification of a researcher staying in Luxembourg in the context of short- and long-term mobility with his/her nuclear family. The legislator furthermore transposed Directive 2014/36 on seasonal workers and Directive 2014/66 on temporary intragroup transfer into national law, and adapted Luxembourg’s immigration law to the needs to the economy, by introducing, amongst other things, and authorisation of stay for investors. Organising the admission of stay and the issuance of authorisations of stay was also a key component within the agreement between Luxembourg and Cape Verde on the concerted management of migratory flows and solidary development. Other objectives of the agreement include the promotion of the movement of people, detailing readmission procedures, fighting against irregular migration, strengthening the legal establishment and integration of the concerned nationals, as well as the mobilisation of skills and resources of migrants in favour of solidary development. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 16 (1 UL)
Full Text
See detailA Dynamic Approach for Combining Abstract Argumentation Semantics – Technical Report
Dauphin, Jérémie UL; Cramer, Marcos UL; van der Torre, Leon UL

Report (2018)

Abstract argumentation semantics provide a direct relation from an argumentation framework to corresponding sets of acceptable arguments, or equivalently to labeling functions. Instead, we study step-wise ... [more ▼]

Abstract argumentation semantics provide a direct relation from an argumentation framework to corresponding sets of acceptable arguments, or equivalently to labeling functions. Instead, we study step-wise update relations on argumentation frameworks whose fixpoints represent the labeling functions on the arguments. We make use of this dynamic approach in order to study novel ways of combining abstract argumentation semantics. In particular, we introduce the notion of a merge of two argumentation semantics, which is defined in such a way that the merge of the preferred and the grounded semantics is the complete semantics. Finally we consider how to define new semantics using the merge operator, in particular how meaningfully combine features of naive-based and complete-based semantics. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 13 (0 UL)
Full Text
See detailImpact of visa liberalisation on countries of destination
Sommarribas, Adolfo UL; Nienaber, Birte UL

Report (2018)

Historically, Luxembourg has developed during the last 68 years strong links with the Western Balkan countries. In 1970, a labour agreement was signed between the Grand Duchy of Luxembourg and the Former ... [more ▼]

Historically, Luxembourg has developed during the last 68 years strong links with the Western Balkan countries. In 1970, a labour agreement was signed between the Grand Duchy of Luxembourg and the Former Republic of Yugoslavia to provide for workers to come to work in Luxembourg. This bilateral agreement created a diaspora from the Western Balkans in Luxembourg. Montenegrin nationals represent the largest third-country national population while the Serbians and the Bosnians represents the 3rd and 4th largest nationality groups. There has been a significant number of naturalisations from the West Balkan countries during the last 10 years. This diaspora was a significant “pull factor” during the Yugoslav Wars (1991-1999) and the economic crisis of 2008. This study was unable to verify direct and automatic links between the entering into force of the visa liberalisation agreements with the West Balkans countries and Eastern Partnership countries and an impact for Luxembourg. The large majority of increases, independently if it is legal migration, irregular migration or international protection did not occur during the next year following the entering into force of the agreements. These increases occurred generally during the second year or later. Concerning visa liberalisation agreements with the Western Balkan countries, the first findings are a dramatic increase of international protection applicants from those countries since the agreements came into force. In the international protection field and in the framework of the return decisions, the visa liberalisation agreement had a negative impact generating stress for all the public administrations during 2011 and 2012, which have to deal with international protection and the return mechanism. During 2011, there was a significant increase of applicants from Macedonia and Serbia and in 2012 from Albania and Bosnia-Herzegovina. This situation placed the Luxembourgish authorities under significant stress to deal with this significant inflow of applicants, whose applications were, in the large majority of cases (80%), rejected. However, this situation obliged the Luxembourgish government to take measures in order to deal in a very efficient manner with these inflows of international protection applicants as well as to overhaul the entire international protection procedure. These measures can be divided into two different: procedural measures and implementation measures. The most significant procedural measures are: a) the introduction of the fast track procedure and the implementation of the ultra-expedite procedure; b) the introduction of these countries in the list of safe countries of origin. These measures allow the authorities to deal more efficiently with the massive influx of international protection applicants coming from the region. The implementation measures are: a) No access to social aid for the applicant benefiting from a commitment to cover all expenses by a Luxembourg national, EU citizen or TCN residing in Luxembourg; b) substantial decrease in monthly cash amounts of social aid for adult individuals and households; c) Recruitment and reallocation of staff in the Directorate of Immigration and the Luxembourg Reception and Integration office; d) implementing the Assisted voluntary return Balkans (AVR Balkans) which only covers the return bus ticket; and e) strengthen cooperation with the authorities of the Western Balkan countries. During 2017, there was an increase in the number of international protection applicants from Georgia and Ukraine, even though both countries are included in the list of safe countries of origin. As Luxembourg does not have external borders with the exception of the International Airport, it is not possible to obtain pertinent information concerning the detection of irregular entries in the territory. Nevertheless, there is some evidence that some individuals from these countries have taken advantage of the visa liberalisation agreements to come to work irregularly in Luxembourg, even if it is not possible to quantify the scale of the phenomenon. The findings of this study do not show an increase in the number of applications for authorisation of stay or residence permits (remunerated and study activities), so the EU visa liberalisation agreements did not have any impact in the legal migration field. The increase of application was visible after the second year of entering into force of these agreements but the numbers were not significant in regard with number of applications made by third-country nationals during the same period. However, the short-stay visits (i.e. friends, family, tourism, etc.) seem not only to have been facilitated, but also increased. In some cases, these short-visits have also been used not only to visit family and friends but also to be familiarized with the Luxembourgish society and to explore job opportunities and look for housing. This is probably the only positive impact that the visa liberalization agreements have had. Seen that the visa liberalisation agreements only allow travelling without a visa, but they do not allow working and staying in the country, and based on the data collected there is not possible to establish a link between them and any significant impact with regard to economy and to criminality (especially related to traffic of human beings or smuggling, where the numbers are very low and not directly related in most cases to nationals concerned by this study). [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 30 (5 UL)
Full Text
See detail(Member) States' Approaches to Unaccompanied Minors Following Status Determination
Petry, Ralph UL; Sommarribas, Adolfo UL; Adao Do Carmo, Kelly UL et al

Report (2018)

The legal framework in Luxembourg does not provide a specific legal status for unaccompanied minors (hereafter UAM), which is why the large majority of them apply for international protection. This allows ... [more ▼]

The legal framework in Luxembourg does not provide a specific legal status for unaccompanied minors (hereafter UAM), which is why the large majority of them apply for international protection. This allows them to stay in the country and to benefit from social and legal assistance, as well as from accommodation. Cases of UAMs presumed or identified victims of human trafficking are rare in Luxembourg. Overall, specific legal frameworks exist according to the status of the UAM: The Law on Asylum, the Law on Immigration and the Law on victims of trafficking in human beings. This framework is completed by general provisions of the Youth Protection Law, which applies to all minors independent of their immigration or legal status. Until the influx of applicants for international protection in 2015 and 2016, the phenomenon of unaccompanied minors has been relatively small in Luxembourg. Particularly 2015 was marked by a high number of UAMs applying for international protection, with 102 introductions of applications compared to 31 applications in 2014. Since, the number of applications has stabilised over the last two years, with 51 applications in 2016 and 50 applications in 2017. In 2015, Afghanistan and Albania were the leading countries of origin of UAMs. In 2016, Afghanistan was still the leading country of origin, followed by Morocco. In 2017, the profiles of the UAMs changed again, with Albania and Morocco as leading countries of origin. In Luxembourg, UAMs are predominantly boys and a large majority is close to the age of majority, or have already reached the age of majority, when a final decision on their application for international protection is issued. However, the Directorate of Immigration reported that they were confronted with a new phenomenon in 2017, namely the arrival of very young UAMs aged between 12 and 14. Every UAM, whether s/he files an application for international protection or not, will be assigned an ad-hoc administrator as soon as possible in order to assist him/her in all legal proceedings. In addition to the designation of an ad-hoc administrator, the organisations that accommodate the UAMs applying for international protection usually request the guardianship (either institutional or personal guardianship) of the UAM who has introduced his application. Different from the ad-hoc administrator, the guardian is assisting and supporting the UAM in all daily life affairs, such as social guidance, integration, education, medical care, acquisition of language skills, leisure activities, etc. In regard to education, the overall aim in Luxembourg is to integrate migrant children, independent of their immigration status, into the general educational system as soon as possible. The latter has experienced a diversification of its offer with a number of specialised measures and services. Together with leisure and extracurricular activities, school is considered to be one of the main contributors to the overall well-being and integration of UAMs into the Luxembourgish society. There are no integration measures that specifically target UAMs. There are no specific transition measures or procedures for UAMs who are approaching their majority, neither in regard to the accommodation and guardianship arrangements, nor in the general context of integration. The organisations responsible for the accommodation and care of the UAMs provide them with a supervision and support according to their specific individual needs. This is also true for the respective legal framework of the UAM, including eventual extensions of residence permits. The return of UAMs is considered to be rare in the Luxembourgish context. As mentioned earlier, this is related to the fact that the large majority of UAMs applying for international protection are close to the age of majority or have already reached majority when a final decision on their application is issued. Furthermore, although foreseen by the Immigration Law, Luxembourg does not carry out forced returns of persons considered to be unaccompanied minors. The International Organisation for Migration (IOM), responsible for (assisted) voluntary returns, reported that they have approximately one voluntary return of an UAM every two years. In 2017, following the recommendation of the evaluation of the Schengen acquis in the area of return in Luxembourg, the government adopted the creation of a new commission with the function of assessing the best interest of the child in the context of return of UAMs. This commission entered into force at the beginning of 2018 and is composed of members of the prosecution service, the National Childhood Office (ONE), the Luxembourg Reception and Integration Agency (OLAI), and finally the Directorate of Immigration, which is chairing the commission. In addition, the ad-hoc administrator is invited to attend the commission meeting for the minor s/he represents. Based on the elements of his/her application, an individual opinion assessing the best interest of the child, in the context of his/her return, will be given for each minor. One of the major reported challenges is the appointment of legal representatives of UAMs (ad-hoc administrator and guardian), as well as the lack of precision of the legal provisions in this context. In the context of return, the Directorate of Immigration reported that they are faced with challenges in regard to getting in contact with the respective countries of origin as well as in regard to cases of applicants not telling the truth. One of the main good practices that has been identified by a number of stakeholders are the new care and accommodation arrangements, allowing to house UAMs in specifically dedicated reception facilities with a 24/7 supervision, depending on the availability of these facilities. In the same context, it was reported that it is of great importance to provide the minors with an environment of trust and support, to listen to them and to reassure them in order to be able to understand their current situation. Particularly the approach of supporting them in elaborating a life plan or life project (“projet de vie”) is considered as being very important for the stability and general well-being as well as for the integration of the UAMs. In addition, it is also important to support them in other matters of integration, such as education, acquisition of language skills, extracurricular activities, etc. In the context of return, Directorate of Immigration reported the newly concluded agreement with IOM in order to conduct family assessments of UAMs in the countries of origin as a good practice. On the one hand, this assessment is one element that will be taken into consideration in the examination of the application of the minor. On the other hand, it helps in assessing the best interest of the child in the event of a return if the application is rejected. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 5 (1 UL)
Full Text
See detailNetzWerk: Die Bedeutung der Sozialen Arbeit für die luxemburgische Gesellschaft
Böwen, Petra UL

Report (2018)

"NetzWerk- Wëssenschaft trëfft Praxis, Politik an Ëffentlechkeet" ist eine regelmäßig erscheinende Publikation und dokumentiert die vielfältigen Angebote des PraxisBüros. Das PraxisBüro bietet allen ... [more ▼]

"NetzWerk- Wëssenschaft trëfft Praxis, Politik an Ëffentlechkeet" ist eine regelmäßig erscheinende Publikation und dokumentiert die vielfältigen Angebote des PraxisBüros. Das PraxisBüro bietet allen Akteuren der Sozialen Arbeit Vernetzung, Plattformen, Veranstaltungen, Informationen aus Luxemburg und der Großregion. Das Schwerpunktthema dieser Ausgabe: "Die Bedeutung der Sozialen Arbeit für die luxemburgische Gesellschaft- Stand der Dinge, Herausforderungen, Perspektiven" fußt auf dem 5. Praxis- und Kontakttag 2017. Es werden u.a. Ergebnisse der Arbeitsmarktbeobachtung in den Feldern der Sozialen Arbeit und Diskussionen mit Akteuren aus Wissenschaft, Praxis und Politik zur Thematik dargestellt. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 554 (54 UL)
Full Text
See detailThe D²Rwanda Study: March 2018 Report
Kallestrup, Per; Vögele, Claus UL; Uwizihiwe, JeanPaul et al

Report (2018)

The Community- and MHealth-Based Integrated Management of Diabetes in Primary Healthcare in Rwanda: the D²Rwanda Study (which stands for Digital Diabetes Study in Rwanda) is a twin PhD project, developed ... [more ▼]

The Community- and MHealth-Based Integrated Management of Diabetes in Primary Healthcare in Rwanda: the D²Rwanda Study (which stands for Digital Diabetes Study in Rwanda) is a twin PhD project, developed in collaboration with Aarhus University (AU) and the University of Luxembourg (UL), and under the auspices of the University of Rwanda and Rwanda Biomedical Centre. The project involves two PhD students, Jean Paul Uwizihiwe (enrolled at AU) and Charilaos Lygidakis (enrolled at UL), and is kindly sponsored by the Karen Elise Jensens Foundation, alongside AU and UL. In this report we wished to narrate what we had been working on for the past two years: from the first steps to understanding better the context and mapping the territory; from obtaining the necessary authorisations to developing the app and translating the questionnaires. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 71 (2 UL)
Full Text
See detailFaithful Semantical Embedding of a Dyadic Deontic Logic in HOL
Benzmüller, Christoph UL; Farjami, Ali UL; Parent, Xavier UL

Report (2018)

A shallow semantical embedding of a dyadic deontic logic by Carmo and Jones in classical higher-order logic is presented. This embedding is proven sound and complete, that is, faithful. The work presented ... [more ▼]

A shallow semantical embedding of a dyadic deontic logic by Carmo and Jones in classical higher-order logic is presented. This embedding is proven sound and complete, that is, faithful. The work presented here provides the theoretical foundation for the implementation and automation of dyadic deontic logic within off-the-shelf higher-order theorem provers and proof assistants. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 42 (1 UL)
Full Text
See detailUniversity of California, Berkeley, Institute of European Studies (IES) Fall 2017 Newsletter
Institute of European Studies, UC Berkeley; Paravantis, Spero UL

Report (2018)

The Fall 2017 newsletter of the University of California, Berkeley, Institute of European Studies (IES). I was a Visiting Scholar at IES from August 2017 to Feb 2018, and from March 1st 2018, I will ... [more ▼]

The Fall 2017 newsletter of the University of California, Berkeley, Institute of European Studies (IES). I was a Visiting Scholar at IES from August 2017 to Feb 2018, and from March 1st 2018, I will become an IES Senior Fellow. My bio is on page 8, and summaries of my lectures are on page 30 (Migration) and 31 (WWI and WWII Reparations and European Integration). [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 163 (2 UL)
See detailAdministration parlementaire, comparaison de la situation en Allemagne, en Belgique, en France, en Suisse et au Luxembourg
Poirier, Philippe UL

Report (2018)

Administration parlementaire, comparaison de la situation en Allemagne, en Belgique, en France, en Suisse et au Luxembourg dans une démarche néo-institutionnaliste

Detailed reference viewed: 27 (1 UL)
Full Text
See detailProceedings - 2017 ILILAS Distinguished Lectures
Bouvry, Pascal UL; Bisdorff, Raymond; Schommer, Christoph UL et al

Report (2018)

The Proceedings summarizes the 12 lectures that have taken place within the ILIAS Dinstguished Lecture series 2017. It contains a brief abstract of the talks as well as some additional information about ... [more ▼]

The Proceedings summarizes the 12 lectures that have taken place within the ILIAS Dinstguished Lecture series 2017. It contains a brief abstract of the talks as well as some additional information about each speaker. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 225 (25 UL)
See detailParlements et Gouvernance économique européenne: Comparaison de la situation en Allemagne, en Belgique, en France, en Suisse et au Luxembourg, rapport pour la Chambre des Députés du Luxembourg
Poirier, Philippe UL

Report (2018)

Gouvernance économique européenne : Comparaison de la situation en Allemagne, en Belgique, en France, en Suisse et au Luxembourg, rapport pour la Chambre des Députés du Luxembourg, dans une perspective ... [more ▼]

Gouvernance économique européenne : Comparaison de la situation en Allemagne, en Belgique, en France, en Suisse et au Luxembourg, rapport pour la Chambre des Députés du Luxembourg, dans une perspective néo-institutionnaliste [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 22 (0 UL)
Full Text
See detailTutorial Big Data Analytics: Overview and Practical Examples
Varrette, Sébastien UL

Report (2018)

This tutorial will offer a synthetic view of Big Data Analytics challenges, the tools permitting to address these challenges and focus on one of these tool through a practical session with a set of ... [more ▼]

This tutorial will offer a synthetic view of Big Data Analytics challenges, the tools permitting to address these challenges and focus on one of these tool through a practical session with a set of concrete examples. Level: beginner - advanced [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 15 (0 UL)
Full Text
See detailThere is no one human scale - Reflections on urban development practice in Luxembourg
Carr, Constance UL; Lutz, Rebecca; Schutz, Kevin

Report (2018)

Detailed reference viewed: 23 (3 UL)
Full Text
See detailAbstract and Concrete Decision Graphs for Choosing Extensions of Argumentation Frameworks - Technical Report
Dauphin, Jérémie UL; Cramer, Marcos UL; van der Torre, Leon UL

Report (2018)

Most argumentation semantics allow for multiple extensions, which raises the question of how to choose among extensions. We propose to study this question as a decision problem. Inspired by decision trees ... [more ▼]

Most argumentation semantics allow for multiple extensions, which raises the question of how to choose among extensions. We propose to study this question as a decision problem. Inspired by decision trees commonly used in economics, we introduce the notion of a decision graph for deciding between the multiple extensions of a given AF in a given semantics. We distinguish between abstract decision graphs and concrete instantiations thereof. Inspired by the principle-based approach to argumentation, we formulate two principles that mappings from argumentation frameworks to decision graphs should satisfy, the principle of decision-graph directionality and the one of directional decision-making. We then propose a concrete instantiation of decision graphs, which satisfies one of these principles. Finally, we discuss the potential for further research based on this novel methodology. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 22 (1 UL)
Full Text
See detailWorkshop on Supergeometry and Applications
Bruce, Andrew UL; Poncin, Norbert UL

Report (2017)

Detailed reference viewed: 79 (9 UL)
Full Text
See detailModelling argumentation on Axiom of Choice in ASPIC-END -- Technical report
Cramer, Marcos UL

Report (2017)

In this technical report, we present an application of the structured argumentation methodology to a debate in the foundations of mathematics. We work with ASPIC-END, a recently proposed adaptation of the ... [more ▼]

In this technical report, we present an application of the structured argumentation methodology to a debate in the foundations of mathematics. We work with ASPIC-END, a recently proposed adaptation of the structured argumentation framework ASPIC+ which can incorporate debates about logical principles, natural deduction style arguments and explanations. We apply this framework to build a preliminary formal model of parts of the debate that mathematicians had about the Axiom of Choice in the early 20th century. Furthermore, we briefly discuss the insight into the strengths and drawbacks of the modeling capacities of ASPIC-END that we have gained from producing this model. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 34 (4 UL)
See detailSozialbericht Esch sur Alzette
Heinz, Andreas UL; Dahmen, Clarissa UL; Ferring, Dieter UL et al

Report (2017)

Detailed reference viewed: 75 (10 UL)
Full Text
See detailL’IDENTIFICATION DES VICTIMES DE LA TRAITE DES ÊTRES HUMAINS LORS DES PROCÉDURES DE PROTECTION INTERNATIONALE ET DE RETOUR FORCÉ
Sommarribas, Adolfo UL; Nienaber, Birte UL

Report (2017)

La note de synthèse présente les principaux résultats de l’étude réalisée en 2013 et actualisée en 2017 par le point de contact luxembourgeois du European Migration Network sur «L’identification des ... [more ▼]

La note de synthèse présente les principaux résultats de l’étude réalisée en 2013 et actualisée en 2017 par le point de contact luxembourgeois du European Migration Network sur «L’identification des victimes de la traite des êtres humains lors des procédures de protection internationale et de retour forcé». [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 33 (6 UL)
Full Text
See detailMigration internationale au Luxembourg - SOPEMI Report 2017
Tüske, Annamaria UL; Sommarribas, Adolfo UL; Nienaber, Birte UL

Report (2017)

Suite au pic constaté en 2015, le nombre de demandes de protection internationale a légèrement diminué en 2016, passant de 2 447 en 2015 à 2 035 en 2016 (soit une baisse de 16,8 %). Malgré le ... [more ▼]

Suite au pic constaté en 2015, le nombre de demandes de protection internationale a légèrement diminué en 2016, passant de 2 447 en 2015 à 2 035 en 2016 (soit une baisse de 16,8 %). Malgré le ralentissement de la tendance, ces chiffres restent supérieurs aux niveaux de 2013-2014. Les ressortissants syriens sont toujours la première nationalité de demandeurs de protection internationale (14,3 %), les ressortissants irakiens chutent à la 4ème place (7,9 %), après les ressortissants albanais (11,2 %) et kosovars (10,2 %). Le Luxembourg continue d’occuper la 4ème place parmi les Etats membres en termes d’accueil de demandeurs de protection internationale par rapport à sa population nationale. Le taux de reconnaissance de protection internationale est passé de 228 (200 statuts de réfugiés et 28 protections subsidiaires) en 2015 à 790 (764 statuts de réfugiés et 26 protections subsidiaires) en 2016. Ces chiffres représentent une augmentation de 246,5 % des décisions positives par rapport à 2015. Le Luxembourg continue de démontrer sa solidarité à l’égard de la relocalisation et de la réinstallation des demandeurs de protection internationale. En 2015, le Luxembourg s’est engagé à relocaliser 557 personnes sur son territoire dans le cadre de la décision du Conseil européen de relocaliser 160 000 demandeurs de protection internationale depuis la Grèce et l’Italie. Dans ce contexte, 197 réfugiés ont été relocalisés fin 2016. Entre janvier 2017 et août 2017, le Luxembourg a relocalisé 186 personnes. Sur le plan de la réinstallation, 52 réfugiés ont été réinstallés depuis la Turquie en 2016, suite à l’engagement du Luxembourg de réinstaller 194 réfugiés en provenance de Turquie dans le cadre de l’accord UE-Turquie du mois de mars 2016. 115 personnes ont été réinstallées entre le 1er janvier 2017 et le 18 août 2017. De nouvelles lois sont entrées en vigueur en 2016/2017 qui concernent la situation migratoire du Luxembourg. Des évolutions politiques d’envergure ont porté sur la mise en œuvre de changements apportés à la législation et aux procédures d’asile, à l’éducation et à la réforme linguistique ainsi que sur des mesures d’intégration révisées en réponse à l’évolution des profils de migration au Luxembourg. L’accent mis sur la migration économique a permis de promouvoir la diversification économique et le repositionnement du centre financier. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 74 (8 UL)
See detailCEN/TC250/SC4.T1: Second Generation of Eurocode 4: Introduction and Amendments to Final Draft October 2017
Banfi, Mike; Mensinger, Martin; Schäfer, Markus UL et al

Report (2017)

Development of second Generation of Eurocode 4, Projectteam CEN/TC250/SC4/T1, Reports for final Draft October 2017

Detailed reference viewed: 64 (7 UL)
Full Text
See detailTowards a Plug-and-Play and Holistic Data Mining Framework for Understanding and Facilitating Operations in Smart Buildings
Li, Daoyuan UL; Bissyande, Tegawendé François D Assise UL; Klein, Jacques UL et al

Report (2017)

Nowadays, a significant portion of the total energy consumption is attributed to the buildings sector. In order to save energy and protect the environment, energy consumption in buildings must be more ... [more ▼]

Nowadays, a significant portion of the total energy consumption is attributed to the buildings sector. In order to save energy and protect the environment, energy consumption in buildings must be more efficient. At the same time, buildings should offer the same (if not more) comfort to their occupants. Consequently, modern buildings have been equipped with various sensors and actuators and interconnected control systems to meet occupants’ requirements. Unfortunately, so far, Building Automation Systems data have not been well-exploited due to technical and cost limitations. Yet, it can be exceptionally beneficial to take full advantage of the data flowing inside buildings in order to diagnose issues, explore solutions and improve occupant-building interactions. This paper presents a plug-and-play and holistic data mining framework named PHoliData for smart buildings to collect, store, visualize and mine useful information and domain knowledge from data in smart buildings. PHoliData allows non technical experts to easily explore and understand their buildings with minimum IT support. An architecture of this framework has been introduced and a prototype has been implemented and tested against real-world settings. Discussions with industry experts have suggested the system to be extremely helpful for understanding buildings, since it can provide hints about energy efficiency improvements. Finally, extensive experiments have demonstrated the feasibility of such a framework in practice and its advantage and potential for buildings operators. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 67 (6 UL)
Full Text
See detailInternational Migration in Luxembourg - SOPEMI Report 2017
Tüske, Annamaria UL; Sommarribas, Adolfo UL; Nienaber, Birte UL

Report (2017)

While the proportion of Luxembourgish nationals among the resident working population was above 50.3% in 2015, it dropped below 50% in the first quarter of 2017. Some 44% of the working population were ... [more ▼]

While the proportion of Luxembourgish nationals among the resident working population was above 50.3% in 2015, it dropped below 50% in the first quarter of 2017. Some 44% of the working population were EU28 nationals and 6% non-EU nationals. Luxembourg’s economy is reliant on its employment of cross-border workers. In 2016, French nationals maintained and increased their proportion of over 50% of the cross-border working population, reaching 51.4% in Q1 2017, at the expense of both Belgian (24.4%) and German (24.2%) cross-border workers. They mainly work in sectors such as construction, administrative/support service, accommodation/food service, as well as in the financial/insurance sector or professional, scientific and technical activities. Between 2010 and 2017, the number of foreign salaried workers showed the greatest continuous increase in sectors such as professional, scientific and technical activities, administrative and support services, and financial and insurance services. Regarding specific permits, nationals of China (119 permits), India (70 permits) and Montenegro (40 permits) accounted for 31% of all first issues of residence permits for salaried workers. Indian nationals were the single largest nationality group receiving their first issue of EU Blue Cards, with 90 issued during 2016. This was followed by US nationals (58 permits) and Russian nationals (36 permits). After reaching a peak in 2015, the number of applications for international protection slightly decreased in 2016, from 2447 in 2015 to 2035 in 2016 (decrease of 16.8%). Even if the trend slowed down, it remains higher than the levels of 2013-2015. Syrian nationals remain the first nationality of applicants for international protection (14.3%), Iraqi nationals dropping to 4th place (7.9%) after Albanian nationals (11.2%) and Kosovars (10.2%). Luxembourg remains the Member State hosting the 4th highest number of applicants for international protection applicants in relation to the national population. The international protection recognition rate increased from 228 (200 refugee status and 28 subsidiary protection) in 2015 to 790 (764 refugee status and 26 subsidiary protection) in 2016. This represents an increase of 246.5% of positive decisions year-on-year. Luxembourg continues to demonstrate its solidarity in respect of the relocation and resettlement of international protection applicants. In 2015, Luxembourg pledged to relocate 557 individuals to Luxembourg in the framework of the EU Council decision to relocate 160,000 international protection applicants from Greece and Italy. Within this framework, 197 refugees had been relocated by the end of 2016. From January 2017 to 18 August 2017, Luxembourg relocated 186 people. With regards to resettlement, 52 refugees were resettled from Turkey in 2016 as a result of Luxembourg’s pledge to resettle 194 refugees from Turkey in the context of the EU-Turkey agreement of March 2016. 115 people were resettled between 1st January 2017 and 18th August 2017. New pieces of legislation were enacted during 2016/2017 to assist with the specific migration situation in Luxembourg. Major policy developments related to the implementation of changes to asylum legislation and procedures, education and language reform, and revised integration measures in response to changing migration profiles within Luxembourg. A focus on economic migration took place to promote economic diversification, start-ups and the repositioning of the financial centre. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 68 (10 UL)
Full Text
See detailModeling Security and Privacy Requirements for Mobile Applications: a Use Case-driven Approach
Mai, Xuan Phu UL; Göknil, Arda UL; Shar, Lwin Khin UL et al

Report (2017)

Defining and addressing security and privacy requirements in mobile apps is a significant challenge due to the high level of transparency regarding users' (private) information. In this paper, we propose ... [more ▼]

Defining and addressing security and privacy requirements in mobile apps is a significant challenge due to the high level of transparency regarding users' (private) information. In this paper, we propose, apply, and assess a modeling method that supports the specification of security and privacy requirements of mobile apps in a structured and analyzable form. Our motivation is that, in many contexts including mobile app development, use cases are common practice for the elicitation and analysis of functional requirements and should also be adapted for describing security requirements. We integrate and adapt an existing approach for modeling security and privacy requirements in terms of security threats, their mitigations, and their relations to use cases in a misuse case diagram. We introduce new security-related templates, i.e., a mitigation template and a misuse case template for specifying mitigation schemes and misuse case specifications in a structured and analyzable manner. Natural language processing can then be used to automatically detect and report inconsistencies among artifacts and between the templates and specifications. Since our approach supports stakeholders in precisely specifying and checking security threats, threat scenarios and their mitigations, it is expected to help with decision making and compliance with standards for improving security. We successfully applied our approach to industrial mobile apps and report lessons learned and results from structured interviews with engineers. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 256 (27 UL)
See detailThe Protection of the Procedural Rights of Persons Concerned by OLAF Administrative Investigations and the Admissibility of OLAF Final Reports as Criminal Evidence
Ligeti, Katalin UL

Report (2017)

This paper provides an analysis of two crucial and interconnected aspects of the current legal framework on the investigations conducted by the European Anti-Fraud Office (OLAF): the procedural safeguards ... [more ▼]

This paper provides an analysis of two crucial and interconnected aspects of the current legal framework on the investigations conducted by the European Anti-Fraud Office (OLAF): the procedural safeguards for the individuals subject to the administrative investigations conducted by OLAF and the admissibility in evidence of OLAF Final Reports in national criminal proceedings. The state of the art and its shortcomings are analysed in the double perspective of the coherent protection of the EU’s financial interests and of the respect of fundamental rights provided by the EU Charter of Fundamental Rights. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 65 (5 UL)
Full Text
See detailGuru: Universal Reputation Module for Distributed Consensus Protocols
Biryukov, Alex UL; Feher, Daniel UL; Khovratovich, Dmitry UL

Report (2017)

In this paper we describe how to couple reputation systems with distributed consensus protocols to provide high-throughput highly-scalable consensus for large peer-to-peer networks of untrusted validators ... [more ▼]

In this paper we describe how to couple reputation systems with distributed consensus protocols to provide high-throughput highly-scalable consensus for large peer-to-peer networks of untrusted validators. We introduce reputation module Guru, which can be laid on top of various consensus protocols such as PBFT or HoneyBadger. It ranks nodes based on the outcomes of consensus rounds run by a small committee, and adaptively selects the committee based on the current reputation. The protocol can also take external reputation ranking as input. Guru can tolerate larger threshold of malicious nodes (up to slightly above 1/2) compared to the 1/3 limit of BFT consensus algorithms. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 285 (16 UL)
Full Text
See detailChallenges and practices for establishing applicants’ identity in the migration process
Sommarribas, Adolfo UL; Petry, Ralph UL; Nienaber, Birte UL

Report (2017)

In Luxembourg, the procedure for identity verification/establishment in the context of international protection is separated from the decision-making procedure as such. While the authority for granting ... [more ▼]

In Luxembourg, the procedure for identity verification/establishment in the context of international protection is separated from the decision-making procedure as such. While the authority for granting international protection status lies with the Ministry in charge of Immigration (Directorate of Immigration), the Judicial Police is in charge of identity verification/establishment. For this means, the applicant will be interviewed with regard to his/her travel itinerary, including questions on border crossing and used means of transports to arrive in Luxembourg. During the last few years, the large majority of international protection applications in Luxembourg have come from persons originating from the Western Balkan countries (in 2016 they represent 35% of the applicants). Concerning these applicants, most of them (85% to 90%) have presented valid identity documents to the authorities in Luxembourg. However, with the migration crisis there is a growing number of international protection applicants coming from the Middle East and North Africa and who cannot produce valid identity documents. National authorities have always been confronted with lacking identity documents, predominantly observable among applicants from African countries. In some cases, identity documents were intentionally destroyed or withheld from the authorities in order to avoid being identified. If credible identity documents are lacking, the identification procedure can become complicated and resource consuming, and the responsible authorities, especially the Police, have a limited set of methods and means available (provided for in the Asylum Law). [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 33 (10 UL)
See detailIncompatibilités, disciplines & déontologies parlementaires, comparaison de la situation en Allemagne, en Belgique, en France, en Suisse et au Luxembourg
Poirier, Philippe UL

Report (2017)

Incompatibilités, disciplines & déontologies parlementaires, comparaison de la situation en Allemagne, en Belgique, en France, en Suisse et au Luxembourg dans une démarche néo-institutionnaliste

Detailed reference viewed: 29 (1 UL)
See detailCEN/TC250/SC4.T1: Second Generation of Eurocode 4: Introduction and Amendments to Second Draft April 2017
Banfi, Mike; Mensinger, Martin; Schäfer, Markus UL et al

Report (2017)

Development of second Generation of Eurocode 4, Projectteam CEN/TC250/SC4/T1, Reports for second Draft April 2017

Detailed reference viewed: 18 (3 UL)
Full Text
See detailNew Luxembourg Nationality Law came into force on 1 April
Scuto, Denis UL

Report (2017)

Detailed reference viewed: 40 (4 UL)
Full Text
See detailAbschlussbericht zum Forschungsprojekt "Bewegter Unterricht in Luxemburg"
Bund, Andreas UL; Scheuer, Claude

Report (2017)

Das Konzept der Bewegten Schule geht auf den Schweizer Pädagogen Urs Illi zurück, der es Mitte der achtziger Jahre vor allem für den Primarbereich entwickelte (Illi, 1995). Ausgehend von einer medizinisch ... [more ▼]

Das Konzept der Bewegten Schule geht auf den Schweizer Pädagogen Urs Illi zurück, der es Mitte der achtziger Jahre vor allem für den Primarbereich entwickelte (Illi, 1995). Ausgehend von einer medizinisch-gesundheitlichen (Bewegung als Gesundheitsressource) und entwick-lungs- und lerntheoretischen (Bewegung als zentrales Element der Kindesentwicklung, Bewe-gung als zusätzlicher Sinnes- und Erfahrungskanal) Begründung, geht es in diesem Konzept grundsätzlich darum, mehr Bewegung in die traditionelle „Sitzschule“ zu bringen. Am Projekt „Bewegter Unterricht in Luxemburg“ nahmen die SchülerInnen und Lehrkräfte der Grundschulen in Angelsberg, Larochette, Nommern, Lintgen und Vichten teil. An den Schulen Angelsberg, Larochette und Nommern fand im Untersuchungszeitraum von September 2014 bis Juni 2016 durchgehend Bewegter Unterricht statt. Diese Schulen werden im Weiteren als „Projektschulen“ bezeichnet. An den Schulen in Lintgen und Vichten wurde nicht „bewegt“ unterrichtet; diese Schulen dienten somit als Kontrollschulen. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 168 (8 UL)
Full Text
See detailBackground Report to EN 1994 - Plastic moment resistance of composite beams
Schäfer, Markus UL; Banfi, Mike

Report (2017)

As part of the development of the second generation of Eurocodes and harmonization of the different European Codes, some clarifications deal with the design value of concrete compression strength and the ... [more ▼]

As part of the development of the second generation of Eurocodes and harmonization of the different European Codes, some clarifications deal with the design value of concrete compression strength and the bending design of steel-composite sections. The following background document describes the issues in design and confusions between Eurocode 2 for the design of concrete structures and Eurocode 4 for the design of composite structures in steel and concrete. The first part is concentrated on the background information and the accentuation of limits for plastic bending design. While the second part represents the results of multiple comparisons between plastic and strain limited design leading to a new design approach. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 20 (0 UL)
Full Text
See detailEconomic Aspects of Old Age Exclusion: A Scoping Review
Myck, Michal; Ogg, Jim; Aigner-Walder, Birgit et al

Report (2017)

Detailed reference viewed: 9 (1 UL)
Full Text
See detailDer Bachelor in Sozial- und Erziehungswissenschaften (BSSE) und seine Praxisfelder
Böwen, Petra UL; Dujardin, Céline UL

Report (2017)

Der vorliegende Forschungsbericht „Der Bachelor in Sozial- und Erziehungswissenschaften (BSSE) und seine Praxisfelder“ beschäftigt sich mit dem Studiengang des BSSE und stellt seine Bedeutung für die ... [more ▼]

Der vorliegende Forschungsbericht „Der Bachelor in Sozial- und Erziehungswissenschaften (BSSE) und seine Praxisfelder“ beschäftigt sich mit dem Studiengang des BSSE und stellt seine Bedeutung für die luxemburgische Gesellschaft im Allgemeinen und für den Arbeitsmarkt der Sozialen Arbeit im Besonderen dar. Er zeigt die Vernetzung der vielfältigen Praxisfelder und der verschiedenen politischen Bereiche auf. Letztere werden durch Beiträge der jeweiligen Minister von den acht zuständigen Ministerien verdeutlicht. Mit diesem Projekt möchte das PraxisBüro auf die Soziale Arbeit als wesentliche Säule für das Funktionieren unserer Gesellschaft hinweisen und weitere Brücken zwischen den unterschiedlichen Akteuren der verschiedenen Praxisfelder schaffen. Durch den BSSE-Studiengang wird seit über 11 Jahren eine Ausbildung in Sozialarbeit/Sozialpädagogik an der Universität Luxemburg angeboten, die den bestehenden Ausbildungstraditionen aus dem Ausland gegenübertritt. Es ist der einzige Studiengang dieser Art in Luxemburg. Das Diplom ermöglicht die Arbeit als éducateur gradué und/oder assistant social und den Zugang zu der Gehaltsgruppe A2 (Bachelorebene) beim Staat. Die Entwicklung und Bedeutung des Studiengangs wird durch die Anzahl der Absolventen und deren Berufsabschlüsse illustriert, wobei auch die wachsende starke Nachfrage bei den Studienplätzen erstmals systematisch aufgearbeitet wird. Die Argumentation einer Typologie der Praxisfelder gibt den sehr vielfältigen sozialen Bereichen eine Ordnung und ermöglicht somit die Analyse der Praktikumsstellen, der Studienabschlussarbeiten und der beruflichen Praxis der BSSE-Studierenden bzw. BSSE-Absolventen. Der Arbeitsmarkt und die Arbeitsmarktchancen der BSSE-Absolventen werden sowohl durch die existierende Fachliteratur und Informationen der Arbeitsmarktverwaltung als auch durch systematische Arbeitsmarktbeobachtungen (hierbei handelt es sich um ein weiteres Forschungsprojekt des PraxisBüros) untersucht. Die konkreten Praxisfelder werden durch die vorausgegangene Typologie und durch BSSEAbsolventen im Beruf selbst vorgestellt. In diesen Beiträgen finden auch die Absolventen, die sich für ein weiterführendes Master-Studium entschieden haben, ihren Platz. Abschließend unterstreichen Fazit und Ausblick die Bedeutung des Studiengangs für die luxemburgische Gesellschaft und laden zu Kooperations-, Netzwerk- und Weiterbildungsmöglichkeiten ein, die die Brücken zwischen Wissenschaft, Praxis und Politik weiter ausbauen und festigen. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 1236 (138 UL)
See detailLes Groupes parlementaires, comparaison de la situation en Allemagne, en Belgique, en France, en Suisse et au Luxembourg, rapport pour la Chambre des Députés du Luxembourg
Poirier, Philippe UL

Report (2017)

Les Groupes parlementaires, comparaison de la situation en Allemagne, en Belgique, en France, en Suisse et au Luxembourg, rapport pour la Chambre des Députés du Luxembourg dans une perspective néo ... [more ▼]

Les Groupes parlementaires, comparaison de la situation en Allemagne, en Belgique, en France, en Suisse et au Luxembourg, rapport pour la Chambre des Députés du Luxembourg dans une perspective néo-institutionnaliste [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 23 (1 UL)
Full Text
See detailCorruption prevention in respect of Members of Parliament, Judges and Prosecutors- Evaluation Report Switzerland
Poirier, Philippe UL

Report (2017)

In a report published, the Council of Europe anti-corruption body (GRECO) highlights the specificities of Switzerland’s institutions which enjoy considerable public confidence. It underlines, however ... [more ▼]

In a report published, the Council of Europe anti-corruption body (GRECO) highlights the specificities of Switzerland’s institutions which enjoy considerable public confidence. It underlines, however, that the very organisation of the system allows subtle pressure to be exerted on politicians and the judiciary (See also the French, German and Italian versions of the report). More specifically, GRECO deems it necessary to increase members of parliament’s (MPs) awareness regarding issues of ethics and conflicts of interest. To this end, it recommends adopting a code, announcing publicly MPs’ conflicts of interest as part of the parliamentary procedure and developing the system for declaring relevant interests. These measures need to be accompanied by a reinforced monitoring of MPs’ compliance with their obligations. While recognising the legitimacy of the principle of the election of judges of the federal courts by the Federal Assembly, GRECO calls for improvements to better ensure the quality and objectivity of the recruitment of these judges. It also underlines the importance of severing ties with the political powers after their election, notably by doing away with the practice of judges paying part of their salary to “their” party. Rules of professional ethics applicable to judges also need to be developed and a transparent disciplinary system put in place. The Office of the Attorney General of the Confederation, which enjoys a large degree of independence, also needs to develop rules of professional ethics applicable to its members and to provide greater transparency in disciplinary matters. The implementation of the 12 recommendations addressed to Switzerland will be assessed by GRECO in the second half of 2018 through its compliance procedure. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 64 (3 UL)
Full Text
See detailIllegal employment of Third-Country Nationals in the EU
Sommarribas, Adolfo UL; Petry, Ralph UL; Nienaber, Birte UL

Report (2017)

Illegal employment by third country nationals is a reality in Luxembourg. However, as well as in the case of grey and informal economy, it is rather hard to grasp or quantify to which extent. Nevertheless ... [more ▼]

Illegal employment by third country nationals is a reality in Luxembourg. However, as well as in the case of grey and informal economy, it is rather hard to grasp or quantify to which extent. Nevertheless, the problem is not as significant as the one of the posted workers which is more relevant and worrisome and needs to be situated in the context of a labour market of the Greater Region. In the past, several labour related regularisation measures have been implemented in Luxembourg in order to provide both employers and employees the possibility to regularise situations of illegal employment. The last labour related regularisation measure was implemented in early 2013 in the context of the transposition of the Employers' Sanctions Directive 2009/52 by law of 21 December 2012. During this regularisation, the Directorate of Immigration received 664 applications. These regularisations give a partial indication of the extent of the phenomenon, even though these numbers do not provide a real picture of the problem because the conditions of this regularisation were very strict and in a very short time frame (less than two months) and a certain number of irregular migrants’ workers were not willing to expose themselves by applying and preferred to remain undetected. This regularisation also provided information on the main sectors were the phenomenon is found in order of importance: HORECA, cleaning, crafts, industry and construction. The Ministry of Labour, Employment and Social and Solidary Economy at the end of the regularisation has insisted in the need to increase the number of controls to employers. The law of 21 December 2012 established administrative as well as criminal sanctions for employers who illegally employ irregularly staying third country nationals, particularly in relation to offenses to the Labour Code in aggravating circumstances. This law amended also article 89 of the Immigration Law abrogating the possibility of making labour related regularisations. The Inspectorate of Labour (‘Inspection de Travail et des Mines’, hereafter called ITM), which is in charge of labour inspections and the control of illegal employment of TCNs in Luxembourg, is currently going through a restructuring phase following the latest audit of this administration from January 2015. Particularly the current insufficient number of staff of the ITM, which is in need of a significant short term increase of staff, represents a main challenge in the field of illegal employment in Luxembourg. It is also in the context of this restructuring phase of the responsible administration that the drafting of this study presented a number of challenges, especially in relation to the operational and statistical part of the template. The information regarding the conditions to be fulfilled by both the employers and the employees in the context of an employment relationship are available on the website of the concerned authorities. Furthermore, they are disseminated by the NGOs working in the field, even though there are no specific campaigns targeted to prevent illegal employment of TCNs. The matter was raised in the context of the ‘social identification badge’, which was introduced in 2013 in order to fight against social dumping in particular in the construction sector. One national stakeholder suggested that the ‘social identification badge’ could be revised and adapted to other economic sectors in order to better monitor and prevent illegal employment. In regards to access to justice and enforcement of rights of illegally employed TCNs, Luxembourg foresees the right for illegally employed TCNs to make a claim against their employer, including in cases in which they have, or have been, returned. This claim falls under the general provisions concerning the right to bring a case before civil courts. The Labour Code establishes that the employer who has employed an irregular staying third-country national must pay to the third-country national the following amounts: 1) salaries and any other emoluments, which a similar employee would have benefited for the same employment; 2) the total amount of outstanding remuneration as well as the cost of the transfer of these amounts to the third-country national to the country to which s/he is returned; 3) the total amount of unpaid social contributions and taxes, including administrative fines, as well as, court and legal fees. In addition, the Labour Code establishes that the third-country national who has been illegally employed before the execution of any return decision has to be systematically and objectively informed by the control agents of his/her rights to recover the outstanding remunerations and back payments, as well as the right to benefit from free of charge legal aid in order to attempt a recovery action against the employer, even if the third-country national has already been returned. Labour unions can support and assist TCNs in legal proceedings related to social and labour law, provided that they have been given a mandate to do so. Eventual costs of administrative and civil proceedings can be taken in charge by the labour unions if the TCN is a member of the respective labour union. The Law does not establish fines against TCN’s who were illegally employed. The TCN may be issued a return decision and lose his/her residence rights; however, the Directorate of immigration processes these situations on a case-by-case basis and inform the persons concerned to terminate the illegal employment situation. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 96 (8 UL)
Full Text
See detailANED Country report on Social Protection and Article 28: Luxembourg
Limbach-Reich, Arthur UL; ANED core team

Report (2017)

Detailed reference viewed: 93 (8 UL)
See detailLes Commissions Parlementaire, comparaison de la situation en Allemagne, en Belgique, en France, en Suisse et au Luxembourg, rapport pour la Chambre des Députés du Luxembourg
Poirier, Philippe UL

Report (2017)

Les Commissions Parlementaire, comparaison de la situation en Allemagne, en Belgique, en France, en Suisse et au Luxembourg, rapport pour la Chambre des Députés du Luxembourg dans une perspective néo ... [more ▼]

Les Commissions Parlementaire, comparaison de la situation en Allemagne, en Belgique, en France, en Suisse et au Luxembourg, rapport pour la Chambre des Députés du Luxembourg dans une perspective néo-institutionnaliste [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 12 (0 UL)
Full Text
See detailFamily reunification of third-country nationals in the EU: national practices (country report Luxembourg)
Petry, David UL; Jacobs, Sarah UL; Sommarribas, Adolfo UL et al

Report (2017)

In Luxembourg, family reunification is one of the main reasons for immigration of third-country nationals. In fact, “family member” and “private reasons (family links)” residence permits (first deliveries ... [more ▼]

In Luxembourg, family reunification is one of the main reasons for immigration of third-country nationals. In fact, “family member” and “private reasons (family links)” residence permits (first deliveries and renewals) represented more than a third of all residence permits issued during the last three years. While the right to family reunification was solely provided by international law and regulated by administrative practice until 2008, the transposition of Directive 2003/86/EC of 22 September 2003 on the right to family reunification led to a much more precise and detailed legal framework. A notable change in legislation has been proposed with the introduction of bill n° 6992 , namely the harmonisation of the conditions that apply to third-country national employees with those of Blue Card holders and researchers. Thus, family reunification requirements for certain categories of applicants shall be alleviated through the abrogation of the 12-month residence requirement for the sponsor. In order to apply for family reunification in Luxembourg, sponsors have to meet a number of requirements for exercising the right to family reunification, which include the provision of suitable accommodation for the size of their family; meeting health and safety standards; health insurance; as well as stable and regular resources to provide for themselves and their family members. As recommended by Directive 2003/86/EC, Luxembourg sets out more favourable conditions to beneficiaries of international protection for the exercise of their right to family reunification. Thus, they do not have to comply with the above-mentioned requirements in case they apply for family reunification within 3 months of being granted the status. Family members who have come to Luxembourg under family reunification have access to education, orientation, vocational training, lifelong learning and professional retraining once their residence permit has been issued. Family members furthermore have access to the labour market. In case the family member has resided in Luxembourg for less than one year when the application is submitted, it will be submitted to the labour market test. Family members can also, under a number of conditions, benefit from guaranteed minimum income, social aid, long-term residence status as well as citizenship. National stakeholders noted that the requirement of finding appropriate accommodation and proving stable and regular resources is one of the main challenges for sponsors. For family members as well as sponsors, having sufficient financial resources to cover the costs of family reunification can be another challenge to accessing family reunification. Family members of beneficiaries of international protection in particular face the more procedural challenge of providing proof of identity and family links, which can be difficult due to lacking documentation, differing administrative practices in the country of origin and/or the lack of cooperation of institutions. Gaining access to family reunification is also particularly difficult for beneficiaries of international protection who arrived in Luxembourg as unaccompanied minors but reached adulthood during the examination of their file, as they must provide proof of their family member’s dependency upon them. The limited number of diplomatic representations of Luxembourg abroad poses a challenge both to family members who must present themselves there, as well as for the Luxembourgish authorities who require information on certain countries. Perceived as a best practice with regard to family reunification are the information that NGOs and the lawyers in the field of migration and asylum provide to beneficiaries of international protection with regard to procedures of family reunification, thereby contributing to the beneficiary’s ability to enter an application for family reunification within the 3-month period. The practice of accepting the submission of an application of family members of beneficiaries of international protection that contains only a commencement of proof of family links and allowing for the finalisation at a later date is also perceived as a good practice, as it enables them to exercise their right to family reunification while benefitting from more favourable conditions. Furthermore, the issuance of a “laisser-passer” for beneficiaries of international protection who cannot obtain travel documents is perceived as a big step forward by national stakeholders. Lastly, Restoring Family Links, a service provided by the Luxembourgish Red Cross, is also considered a reliable tool with regard to tracing missing family members abroad. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 248 (30 UL)
Full Text
See detailAugmenting and Structuring User Queries to Support Efficient Free-Form Code Search
Sirres, Raphael; Bissyande, Tegawendé François D Assise UL; Kim, Dongsun UL et al

Report (2017)

Source code terms such as method names and variable types are often different from conceptual words mentioned in a search query. This vocabulary mismatch problem can make code search inefficient. In this ... [more ▼]

Source code terms such as method names and variable types are often different from conceptual words mentioned in a search query. This vocabulary mismatch problem can make code search inefficient. In this paper, we present Code voCABUlary (CoCaBu), an approach to resolving the vocabulary mismatch problem when dealing with free-form code search queries. Our approach leverages common developer questions and the associated expert answers to augment user queries with the relevant, but missing, structural code entities in order to improve the performance of matching relevant code examples within large code repositories. To instantiate this approach, we build GitSearch, a code search engine, on top of GitHub and StackOverflow Q\&A data. We evaluate GitSearch in several dimensions to demonstrate that (1) its code search results are correct with respect to user-accepted answers; (2) the results are qualitatively better than those of existing Internet-scale code search engines; (3) our engine is competitive against web search engines, such as Google, in helping users complete solve programming tasks; and (4) GitSearch provides code examples that are acceptable or interesting to the community as answers for StackOverflow questions. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 177 (29 UL)
Full Text
See detailMedia Pluralism monitor 2016: Luxembourg
Kies, Raphaël UL; Nommesch, Kies; Schall, Céline

Report (2017)

Detailed reference viewed: 113 (18 UL)
See detailShear Connections in Composite Flexural Members of Steel and Concrete
Leskelä, M.; Aribert, J-M.; Ciutina, A. et al

Report (2017)

Detailed reference viewed: 110 (4 UL)
Full Text
See detailResearch-based Analysis of Youth in Action: Results of the surveys with project participants and project leaders between 2011 and 2014 in Luxembourg
Meyers, Christiane UL; Weis, Daniel UL; Willems, Helmut UL

Report (2017)

The following report gives an overview of the results of several surveys realised between 2011 and 2014 in the framework of the Youth in Action programme (YiA) in Luxembourg. The projects evaluated in ... [more ▼]

The following report gives an overview of the results of several surveys realised between 2011 and 2014 in the framework of the Youth in Action programme (YiA) in Luxembourg. The projects evaluated in these studies were all funded under the YiA programme between 2007 and 2013. The YiA programme has been set up by the European Union for young people aged 13 to 30 years in order to promote mobility within and beyond the EU's borders, non‐formal learning and intercultural dialogue. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 32 (6 UL)
Full Text
See detailMidterm Evaluation Erasmus+. Evaluationsstudie zur Implementierung von Erasmus+ in Luxemburg
Weis, Daniel UL; Meyers, Christiane UL; Willems, Helmut UL

Report (2017)

Der vorliegende Bericht stellt die Ergebnisse der Zwischenevaluation über die Durchführung und die Wirkung des Programms Erasmus+ in Luxemburg vor. Mit der Durchführung der Evaluation und der ... [more ▼]

Der vorliegende Bericht stellt die Ergebnisse der Zwischenevaluation über die Durchführung und die Wirkung des Programms Erasmus+ in Luxemburg vor. Mit der Durchführung der Evaluation und der Berichterstellung wurde die Jugendforschung der Universität Luxemburg unter Leitung von Prof. Dr. Helmut Willems vom zuständigen Ministerium (Ministère de l'Éducation nationale, de l'Enfance et de la Jeunesse) beauftragt. Der vorliegende Evaluationsbericht ergänzt die im Auftrag der Europäischen Kommission parallel erfolgende externe Evaluierung und rückt die nationale luxemburgische Perspektive in den Fokus. Der Schwerpunkt der Evaluation liegt daher auf den Erfahrungen und Rückmeldungen der relevanten Akteure (Ministerium, Agenturen, Projektverantwortliche, Projektteilnehmer) bezüglich der Implementierung, Durchführung und Auswirkungen des Programms in Luxemburg. Deren Einschätzungen werden im Bericht dargestellt. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 38 (6 UL)
See detailMapping Educational Paths of Youth Workers and Gathering Knowledge on Youth Work – Country Sheet Luxembourg.
Heinen, Andreas UL

Report (2017)

This report is part of a research initiative entitled Mapping Educational Paths of Youth Workers and Gathering Knowledge on Youth Work. Its main objective is to contribute to a better understanding and ... [more ▼]

This report is part of a research initiative entitled Mapping Educational Paths of Youth Workers and Gathering Knowledge on Youth Work. Its main objective is to contribute to a better understanding and sharing of information about the education and training of youth workers across Europe and what employment/ career paths it prepares them for. The data collected will be part of a report by the EU-CoE youth partnership. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 42 (0 UL)
Full Text
See detailErgebnisse der Schulung "BEE SECURE for schools" 2016/17
Tiemann, Aline; Steffgen, Georges UL

Report (2017)

Im vorliegenden Bericht werden die aktuellen Befunde der Evaluation der Schulung BEE SECURE aus dem Jahr 2016/17 dargestellt. Die Schulung zur Förderung der Medienkompetenz wurde in diesem Jahr an 144 ... [more ▼]

Im vorliegenden Bericht werden die aktuellen Befunde der Evaluation der Schulung BEE SECURE aus dem Jahr 2016/17 dargestellt. Die Schulung zur Förderung der Medienkompetenz wurde in diesem Jahr an 144 Grund- und Sekundarschulen in Luxemburg durchgeführt. Im Anschluss an die Schulung wurden jeweils von den Trainern, die die Schulung gehalten hatten und von den Schülern und deren Lehrern Fragebögen ausgefüllt. Somit lagen die Daten von 739 Trainerfragebögen, 768 Lehrerfragebögen und 10062 Schülerfragebögen dem Evaluationsdatensatz zugrunde. Der Lehrerfragebogen beinhaltete verschiedene Aussagen zur Effektivität der Schulung und zur Durchführung der Schulung. Es zeigte sich, dass die Lehrer sowohl mit der Effektivität als auch der Durchführung zufrieden bis sehr zufrieden waren. Die Auswertung der Trainerfragebögen zeigte, dass sie mit den meisten Aspekten des Trainings zufrieden waren. Besonders positiv wurden die Disziplin, das Klassenklima, die Lehrkräfteeinbindung sowie die Organisation bewertet. Weniger positiv wurde der Wissenstand der Schüler im Bezug auf das Internet und die Erfahrungsberichte der Schüler wahrgenommen. In Bezug auf die Schülerdaten zeigte sich, dass knapp über die Hälfte der Schüler bereits schon mal an einer BEE SECURE Schulung teilgenommen hatten. Alle abgefragten Aspekte des Trainings wurden von den Schülern durchweg als sehr positiv eingeschätzt. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 37 (2 UL)
Full Text
See detailMigrants and their Descendants: Social Inclusion and Participation in Society
Vysotskaya, Volha UL; Fernandes Neves, Catia; Ramires Campino, Ana Rita et al

Report (2017)

Detailed reference viewed: 25 (3 UL)
Full Text
See detailAn Open Dataset for Human Activity Analysis using Smart Devices
Faye, Sébastien UL; Louveton, Nicolas UL; Jafarnejad, Sasan UL et al

Report (2017)

The study of human mobility and activities has opened up to an incredible number of studies in the past, most of which included the use of sensors distributed on the body of the subject. More recently ... [more ▼]

The study of human mobility and activities has opened up to an incredible number of studies in the past, most of which included the use of sensors distributed on the body of the subject. More recently, the use of smart devices has been particularly relevant because they are already everywhere and they come with accurate miniaturized sensors. Whether it is smartphones, smartwatches or smartglasses, each device can be used to describe complementary information such as emotions, precise movements, or environmental conditions. In this short paper, we release the applications we have developed and an example of a collected dataset. We propose that opening multi-sensors data from daily activities may enable new approaches to studying human behavior. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 95 (10 UL)
Full Text
See detailFEUTURE EU 28 Country Report: Luxembourg
Högenauer, Anna-Lena UL

Report (2017)

Detailed reference viewed: 27 (2 UL)
See detailAnalyse de l’impact des interactions sectorielles sur l’évolution des salaires. Comparaison de quatre pays
Bourgain, Arnaud UL; Sneessens, Henri UL; Shadman, Fatemeh et al

Report (2017)

The main objective is to examine the interactions between various sectors in the determination of wages. After a brief description of sectoral specificities in wage setting, the core of the project ... [more ▼]

The main objective is to examine the interactions between various sectors in the determination of wages. After a brief description of sectoral specificities in wage setting, the core of the project consists in estimating different wages functions taking into account wage spillovers across macro-sectors (manufacturing industry, finance, other services and public sector). To this end, we use quarterly sectoral data on four countries (Belgium, Luxembourg, France, Germany) over the period 1995-2014 and we estimate VAR-ECM and other econometric models addressing potential endogeneity problems. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 49 (1 UL)
Full Text
See detailLongitudinal study of LLC student destinations. Phase One: Motivations, experiences and outcomes in the lives of LLC students
Paraschivescu, Claudia UL

Report (2017)

The report investigates the daily experiences of mature students at the University of Leeds, UK.

Detailed reference viewed: 16 (2 UL)
Full Text
See detailPolicy Report on Migration and Asylum (2016)
Petry, David UL; Jacobs, Sarah UL; Nienaber, Birte UL

Report (2017)

The present report provides an overview of the main debates and developments in relation to migration and asylum in Luxembourg in 2016. The issue of migration remained on the forefront of public and ... [more ▼]

The present report provides an overview of the main debates and developments in relation to migration and asylum in Luxembourg in 2016. The issue of migration remained on the forefront of public and political debate, a debate axed on both planned legislative changes as well as the concrete migratory situation in Luxembourg. Four topics dominated public and policy discussions over the course of the year: the reform on Luxembourgish nationality, economic migration, the organisation of reception, as well as support and integration measures, linked to the continued inflow of applicants for international protection (AIPs) in 2016 and steps taken to adapt formal and informal education to the increasing heterogeneity of Luxembourg’s population. The debate on international protection that arose in 2015 was carried onward in 2016, the focus shifting towards reception, support and integration measures. As the inflow of AIPs remained relatively high in 2016 with 2.043 applications, Luxembourg’s Reception and Integration Agency (OLAI) warned throughout the year that the country’s structures would soon reach the limits of their capacity. Linked to the high recognition rate, the legal challenges that local residents put to the plans for the construction of new reception facilities and the difficulty of beneficiaries of international protection (BIPs) in finding appropriate accommodation, the perceived dearth of housing was discussed broadly by the public, the media, as well as civil society and political actors. The continued inflow of AIPs also put a strain on the concerned administrations, both in terms of financial and human resources, leading to discussions regarding the duration of procedures and the variations of this duration. Moreover, the question of integration or support measures for beneficiaries and applicants stepped to the forefront: the changed profile of people arriving in Luxembourg posed new challenges to language learning and education for the newly arrived, and overall, emphasised the need to adapt existing and create new integration and support measures for beneficiaries and applicants. At the same time, the role of non-governmental organisations in supporting the government in the reception of applicants and in establishing new projects facilitating their integration also grew over the course of 2016, not least due to over 80 projects being granted funding by the Oeuvre Nationale de Secours Grande Duchesse Charlotte (henceforth Oeuvre). The Luxembourgish Centre for Integration and Social Cohesion (LISKO), part of the Red Cross and supported by convention to the Ministry for Family and Integration opened its doors in April 2016. The newly created centre will take care of the integration of BIPs into Luxembourg’s society, putting its emphasis on facilitating access to housing. The planned extension of the maximum period of detention for families with children and unaccompanied minors (UAMs) from 72 hours to 7 days precipitated strong reactions from civil society and the public. Luxembourg furthermore followed through on its resettlement and relocation commitments made in 2015, with 167 persons being relocated from Greece and Italy to Luxembourg and with 52 being resettled in the context of the EU-Turkey agreement over the course of 2016. The adaptation of Luxembourg’s legislation in the domain of legal migration also took shape over in 2016 and was broadly debated during the law-making process, while warranting less public attention. With the introduction of one bill, the legislator started the process of transposing Directive 2014/36/EU on seasonal workers and Directive 2014/66/EU on intra-corporate transfers into national law. The same bill furthermore introduced an authorisation of stay for investors, the aspect most commented on by civil society; a mechanism for continuation of activity; detailed the conditions under which a TCN (third country national) corporate officer (mandataire social) can apply for an authorisation of stay, extended the period of validity of the "European Blue Card" residence permit from two to four years, modified dispositions regarding the change of status of students and facilitated family reunification. These developments are to be framed within a wider context of economic diversification, encouragement of entrepreneurship and the repositioning of the financial centre. The reform of the Luxembourgish nationality, another major subject of discussion, was recognised as the best way to counteract Luxembourg’s increasing democratic deficit after the electorate’s refusal to extend legislative voting rights to foreign residents, decided in the referendum of 2015. This reform further proceeded over the course of 2016, reintroduced the perennial language debate in Luxembourg, a larger debate on the role and status of the Luxembourgish language as well as its relation to integration of migrants into Luxembourgish society. In order to increase foreign residents’ participation in the upcoming municipal elections of October 2017, the government launched an awareness campaign encouraging foreign residents to register on the electoral roll, and provided support for organisations wishing to organise complementary actions. The Ministry of National Education and Youth made efforts to find responses to the growing heterogeneity of Luxembourg’s population, aiming to diversify and broaden the post-primary school offer, to develop plurilingual education in nurseries and to develop non-formal education by reforming in-kind benefits, this with the aim of promoting integration and equal opportunity. The transposition of Directive 2013/55/EU on the recognition of professional qualifications was also completed in 2016. The law further amended several national provisions, recast the legislation in the field of recognition of diplomas, combined all applicable provisions in a single legislative text and simplified the procedure for recognition. The debate regarding the return of irregular migrants circled around a number of issues in 2016: the exclusion of Kosovar nationals from the AVRRL programme, the Schengen evaluation and the aforementioned resulting changes to provisions on detention, the debate on the enforcement of the EU-Afghanistan ‘Joint way forward on migration issues’ agreement, as well as the continuation of the elaboration of readmission agreements. Luxembourg’s government took further steps in the fight against trafficking in human beings (THB) over the course of 2016. The Council of Government adopted the National Action Plan on trafficking in human beings, which focuses on the detection and protection of victims, the prosecution and punishment of perpetrators and a policy to combat trafficking. Luxembourg’s strategy on prostitution was presented, consisting of a National Action Plan on prostitution and a bill strengthening the fight against the exploitation of prostitution, procuring and THB. Additionally, the Consultative Commission on Human Rights (Commission Consultative des Droits de l’Homme – CCDH) published its first report on THB, which reviewed the years 2014-2016. In reference to migration and development, Luxembourg continued putting emphasis on vocational training and integration programmes in its indicative cooperation programmes with partner countries. Additionally, the Council of Government approved the bill on the agreement between the Grand Duchy of Luxembourg and the Republic of Cape Verde on the concerted management of migratory flows and solidarity-based development, facilitating the movement of persons and to encourage temporary circular professional migration between Luxembourg and Cape Verde. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 26 (2 UL)
Full Text
See detailLieux en travail - Bonnevoie en mouvement
Haas, Claude UL; Marthaler, Thomas UL; Uhler, Nicolas

Report (2017)

Detailed reference viewed: 31 (5 UL)
See detail21st century skills for the 21st century work place. Special section.
Murphy, Kevin; Greiff, Samuel UL; Niepel, Christoph UL

Report (2017)

Detailed reference viewed: 51 (3 UL)
Full Text
See detailThe KISS principle in Software-Defined Networking: An architecture for Keeping It Simple and Secure
Kreutz, Diego UL; Verissimo, Paulo UL; Magalhaes, Catia et al

Report (2017)

Security is an increasingly fundamental requirement in Software-Defined Networking (SDN). However, the pace of adoption of secure mechanisms has been slow, which we estimate to be a consequence of the ... [more ▼]

Security is an increasingly fundamental requirement in Software-Defined Networking (SDN). However, the pace of adoption of secure mechanisms has been slow, which we estimate to be a consequence of the performance overhead of traditional solutions and of the complexity of the support infrastructure required. As a first step to addressing these problems, we propose a modular secure SDN control plane communications architecture, KISS, with innovative solutions in the context of key distribution and secure channel support. A comparative analysis of the performance impact of essential security primitives guided our selection of basic primitives for KISS. We further propose iDVV, the integrated device verification value, a deterministic but indistinguishable-from-random secret code generation protocol, allowing the local but synchronized generation/verification of keys at both ends of the channel, even on a per-message basis. iDVV is expected to give an important contribution both to the robustness and simplification of the authentication and secure communication problems in SDN. We show that our solution, while offering the same security properties, outperforms reference alternatives, with performance improvements up to 30% over OpenSSL, and improvement in robustness based on a code footprint one order of magnitude smaller. Finally, we also prove and test randomness of the proposed algorithms. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 60 (1 UL)
Full Text
See detailRapport politique sur les migrations et l'asile (2016)
Petry, David UL; Jacobs, Sarah UL; Nienaber, Birte UL

Report (2017)

Le présent rapport fait la synthèse des principaux débats et des évolutions concernant l’immigration et l’asile au Luxembourg en 2016. Au cours de cette année, quatre sujets ont dominé les discussions ... [more ▼]

Le présent rapport fait la synthèse des principaux débats et des évolutions concernant l’immigration et l’asile au Luxembourg en 2016. Au cours de cette année, quatre sujets ont dominé les discussions publiques et politiques : l’organisation de l’accueil, ainsi que les mesures de soutien et d’intégration, en lien avec l’afflux continu de demandeurs de protection internationale (DPI) en 2016, la réforme de la loi sur la nationalité luxembourgeoise, la migration économique, et les mesures prises ou envisagées pour adapter l’éducation formelle et informelle à l’hétérogénéité croissante de la population luxembourgeoise. Le débat sur la protection internationale soulevé en 2015 s’est poursuivi en 2016, en se concentrant cette fois-ci sur les mesures d’accueil, de soutien et d’intégration. L’afflux de DPI demeurant relativement élevé en 2016 avec 2 043 demandes, l’Office luxembourgeois de l’accueil et de l’intégration (OLAI) n’a cessé, tout au long de l’année, de mettre l’accent sur le fait que les structures du pays atteindraient prochainement les limites de leur capacité d’accueil. Les difficultés que rencontrent les bénéficiaires de protection internationale (BPI) pour trouver un logement approprié et la contestation tant populaire que judiciaire des résidents locaux pour contrer les projets de construction de nouveaux foyers d’accueil, ont donné lieu à des débats à grande échelle auxquels ont participé le public, les médias ainsi que la société civile et les acteurs politiques. L’afflux continu de DPI a également exercé des pressions sur les administrations concernées, aussi bien en termes de ressources financières que de ressources humaines, et ont entraîné des discussions sur la longueur des procédures et les variations de ces délais. L’accueil des DPI et l’intégration des BPI est devenu un défi important alors que le nouveau profil des personnes entrant au Luxembourg a induit de nouveaux enjeux en termes d’apprentissage de la langue et d’éducation des nouveaux arrivants et dans l’ensemble, a souligné la nécessité d’adapter les mesures de soutien existantes et d’en créer de nouvelles pour les bénéficiaires et les demandeurs. Parallèlement, le rôle des organisations non gouvernementales en matière de soutien du Gouvernement dans le cadre de l’accueil des demandeurs et de mise en place de nouveaux projets venant faciliter leur intégration, a également pris de l’ampleur en 2016, notamment du fait des plus de 80 projets financés par l’Œuvre Nationale de Secours Grande Duchesse Charlotte (ci-après l’Œuvre). De nouveaux acteurs sont apparus sur la scène publique avec l’instauration du Centre luxembourgeois pour l’intégration et la cohésion sociale (LISKO) de la Croix Rouge conventionné par le ministère de la Famille, de l’Intégration et à la Grande Région, qui a pour objet de promouvoir l’intégration des BPI au sein de la société luxembourgeoise, en privilégiant l’accès au logement. Toujours, sur le plan de la protection internationale, le Luxembourg a poursuivi les engagements pris en 2015 en matière de réinstallation et de relocalisation, 167 personnes ayant été relocalisées de Grèce et d’Italie vers le Luxembourg et 52 ayant été réinstallées dans le cadre de la Déclaration UE-Turquie en 2016. La lutte contre la traite des êtres humains (TEH) était un autre sujet de préoccupation important en 2016. Le Conseil de gouvernement a adopté le Plan d’action national sur la traite des êtres humains qui comprend des mesures relatives à la détection et la protection des victimes, la poursuite judiciaire et les sanctions imposées aux auteurs et qui vise la mise en place d’une politique active et efficace de lutte contre la traite. La stratégie du Luxembourg sur la prostitution a été présentée : elle consiste en un Plan d’action national sur la prostitution et en un projet de loi qui renforce la lutte contre l’exploitation de la prostitution, le proxénétisme et la traite des êtres humains. De plus, le rapporteur national, la Commission Consultative des Droits de l’Homme (CCDH) a publié son premier rapport sur la traite des êtres humains, qui couvre les années 2014 à 2016. L’adaptation de la législation luxembourgeoise dans le domaine de la migration légale a également pris forme en 2016, bien que suscitant moins d’intérêt et de débat public. Avec l’introduction d’un projet de loi, le législateur a lancé le processus de transposition de la Directive 2014/36/UE sur les travailleurs saisonniers et de la Directive 2014/66/UE sur les transferts temporaires intra-groupe en droit national. Ce même projet de loi a également introduit une autorisation de séjour destinée aux investisseurs et un mécanisme de continuité d’activité, a détaillé les conditions dans lesquelles un mandataire social ressortissant d’un pays tiers (RPT) pouvait demander une autorisation de séjour, a prolongé la période de validité du titre de séjour « Carte bleue européenne », a modifié les dispositions concernant le changement du statut des étudiants et a facilité le regroupement familial. Ces évolutions sont à situer dans un contexte plus large de diversification économique, d’incitation à l’entreprenariat et de repositionnement du centre financier. Dans le domaine de la migration et du développement, le Luxembourg a continué de mettre l’accent sur les formations professionnelles et les projets d’intégration dans ses programmes indicatifs de coopération avec les pays partenaires. Par ailleurs, le Conseil de gouvernement a approuvé le projet de loi sur l’accord entre le Grand-Duché de Luxembourg et la République du Cap-Vert sur la gestion concertée des flux migratoires et le développement solidaire facilitant la circulation des personnes et visant à encourager la migration professionnelle circulaire temporaire entre le Luxembourg et le CapVert. Sur le plan du retour des migrants en situation irrégulière ou sans droit de séjour il convient de mentionner l’exclusion des ressortissants du Kosovo du programme AVRRL, le processus d’évaluation Schengen et les changements qui en résultent sur les dispositions en matière de rétention : L’extension prévue de la période maximale de rétention pour les familles avec enfants et pour les mineurs non accompagnés (MNA) qui devait passer de 72 heures à 7 jours, a suscité de vives réactions de la part de la société civile. La mise en œuvre de la Déclaration UE-Afghanistan « Joint Way Forward on migration issues », ainsi que la poursuite de l’élaboration des accords de réadmission ont constitué d’autres aspects importants de la politique migratoire. Sur le plan des politiques d’intégration, le projet de réforme de la loi sur la nationalité luxembourgeoise a été considéré comme moyen important pour lutter contre le déficit démocratique croissant du Luxembourg suite au refus des électeurs d’accorder le droit de vote aux résidents étrangers pour les législatives lors du référendum de 2015. Avec ce projet de réforme a été relancé le perpétuel débat sur les langues au Luxembourg, en particulier sur le rôle et le statut de la langue luxembourgeoise et son lien avec l’intégration des migrants au sein de la société luxembourgeoise. Afin de renforcer la participation des résidents étrangers aux prochaines élections municipales du mois d’octobre 2017, le Gouvernement a lancé une campagne de sensibilisation, pour encourager les résidents étrangers à s’inscrire sur les listes électorales. Le ministère de l’Education nationale, de l’Enfance et de la Jeunesse s’est efforcé de trouver des réponses à l’hétérogénéité croissante de la population luxembourgeoise, en visant à diversifier et à élargir l’offre d’enseignement, à développer l’éducation non formelle et l’éducation plurilingue dans les crèches dans le but de promouvoir l’intégration et l’égalité des chances. La transposition de la Directive 2013/55/UE sur la reconnaissance des qualifications professionnelles a également été menée à bien en 2016. La loi a modifié plusieurs dispositions nationales, et regroupé toutes les dispositions applicables en un seul texte législatif tout en simplifiant la procédure de reconnaissance. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 50 (8 UL)
Full Text
See detailKripke Semantics for BL0 and BL – Technical report
Cramer, Marcos UL; Garg, Deepak

Report (2017)

We describe Kripke semantics for the access control logics BL0 and BL, developed by Garg and Pfenning.

Detailed reference viewed: 31 (6 UL)
Full Text
See detailExtending Typicality for Description Logics
Booth, Richard; Casini, Giovanni UL; Meyer, Thomas et al

Report (2017)

Recent extensions of description logics for dealing with different forms of non-monotonic reasoning don’t take us beyond the case of defeasible subsumption. In this paper we enrich the DL EL⊥ with a ... [more ▼]

Recent extensions of description logics for dealing with different forms of non-monotonic reasoning don’t take us beyond the case of defeasible subsumption. In this paper we enrich the DL EL⊥ with a (constrained version of) a typicality operator •, the intuition of which is to capture the most typical members of a class, providing us with the DL EL•⊥. We argue that EL•⊥ is the smallest step one can take to increase the expressivity beyond the case of defeasible subsumption for DLs, while still retaining all the rationality properties an appropriate notion of defeasible subsumption is required to satisfy, and investigate what an appropriate notion of non-monotonic entailment for EL•⊥ should look like. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 53 (3 UL)
Full Text
See detailSociétés francophones dans le monde de 2050 : Une génération de développement humain soutenable
Chauvel, Louis UL; Hartung, Anne UL; Bar-Haim, Eyal UL et al

Report (2017)

Ce rapport est consacré à une question cruciale pour la Francophonie : le développement démographique, socioéconomique et humain comparé à l’horizon 2050 des sociétés francophones – ces pays membres ou ... [more ▼]

Ce rapport est consacré à une question cruciale pour la Francophonie : le développement démographique, socioéconomique et humain comparé à l’horizon 2050 des sociétés francophones – ces pays membres ou non de l’APF où la langue française joue un rôle important dans l’échange d’idées au quotidien. Il s’agit ici tout à la fois d’un bilan de ce développement depuis 1980 et d’une prospective à l’horizon de 2050. Nous soulignons le renouveau mondial de la francophonie au cours du XXIe siècle, en particulier dans le contexte de sociétés multilingues. Après des décennies de stagnation en proportion de la population mondiale, les pays francophones et la francophonie pourraient émerger comme troisième ère linguistique après l’Anglais et le Chinois, avec une présence sur l’ensemble des continents. Au travers d’un bilan dynamique des sociétés francophones, un ensemble de défis sont mis en évidence : la comparaison met en lumière les risques démographiques, de surpopulation, de pauvreté extrême, de gradient de développement humain (éducation, santé, égalité entre femmes et hommes, etc.). La génération qui vient pourrait voir une amplification des difficultés si nous suivons le scénario central de la prospective. Un autre scénario, optimiste, permet d’envisager une meilleure croissance des pays les plus pauvres, une marche vers l’égalisation du développement humain, un redéveloppement harmonieux, en promouvant la richesse humaine des pays en développement. C’est le message du philosophe Hans Jonas : en nous conformant au devoir d’améliorer le sort des générations suivantes, en investissant en elle, nous nous enrichirons ensemble. Sur cette voie, la pratique d’une francophonie multilingue – où le français est une langue officielle parmi d’autres – semble offrir aux pays qui la connaissent un surcroît de ressources de développement, en accroissant les canaux de la communication en interne et avec les autres pays. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 116 (14 UL)