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See detailUsing Passive Data Collection Methods to Learn Complex Mobility Patterns: An Exploratory Analysis
Toader, Bogdan UL; Cantelmo, Guido UL; Popescu, Mioara et al

Scientific Conference (in press)

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See detailJoint Scheduling and Precoding for Frame-Based Multigroup Multicasting in Satellite Communications
Bandi, Ashok UL; Shankar, Bhavani UL; Chatzinotas, Symeon UL et al

Scientific Conference (2019, December 09)

Recent satellite standards enforce the coding of multiple users’ data in a frame. This transmission strategy mimics the well-known physical layer multigroup multicasting (MGMC). However, typical beam ... [more ▼]

Recent satellite standards enforce the coding of multiple users’ data in a frame. This transmission strategy mimics the well-known physical layer multigroup multicasting (MGMC). However, typical beam coverage with a large number of users and limited frame length lead to the scheduling of only a few users. Moreover, in emerging aggressive frequency reuse systems, scheduling is coupled with precoding. This is addressed in this work, through the joint design of scheduling and precoding for frame-based MGMC satellite systems. This aim is formulated as the maximization of the sum-rate under per beam power constraint and minimum SINR requirement of scheduled users. Further, a framework is proposed to transform the non-smooth SR objective with integer scheduling and nonconvex SINR constraints as a difference-of-convex problem that facilitates the joint update of scheduling and precoding. Therein, an efficient convex-concave procedure based algorithm is proposed. Finally, the gains (up to 50%) obtained by the jointed design over state-of-the-art methods is shown through Monte-Carlo simulations. [less ▲]

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See detailNeed for Cognition across school tracks: The importance of learning environments
Colling, Joanne UL; Wollschläger, Rachel UL; Keller, Ulrich UL et al

Scientific Conference (2019, November 06)

Detailed reference viewed: 42 (5 UL)
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See detailSimilarities and differences of value-added scores from models with different covariates: A cluster analysis
Levy, Jessica UL; Brunner, Martin; Keller, Ulrich UL et al

Scientific Conference (2019, November 06)

Detailed reference viewed: 37 (3 UL)
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See detailMath and Reading Difficulties in a Multilingual Educational Setting
Martini, Sophie Frédérique UL; Fischbach, Antoine UL; Ugen, Sonja UL

Scientific Conference (2019, November 06)

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See detailDimensional and Social Comparison Effects on Domain-Specific Academic Self-Concepts and Interests with First- and Third-Grade Students
van der Westhuizen, Lindie UL; Arens, Katrin; Keller, Ulrich UL et al

Scientific Conference (2019, November 06)

Academic self-concepts (ASCs) are self-perceptions of one’s own academic abilities. The internal/external frame of reference (I/E) model (Marsh, 1986) explains the formation of domain-specific ASCs ... [more ▼]

Academic self-concepts (ASCs) are self-perceptions of one’s own academic abilities. The internal/external frame of reference (I/E) model (Marsh, 1986) explains the formation of domain-specific ASCs through a combination of social (i.e. comparing one’s achievement in one domain with the achievement of others in the same domain) and dimensional (i.e. comparing one’s achievement in one domain with one’s achievement in another domain) comparisons. This results into positive achievement-self-concept relations within the math and verbal domains, but into negative achievement-self-concept relations across these domains. The generalized internal/external frame of reference (GI/E) model (Möller, Müller-Kalthoff, Helm, Nagy, & Marsh, 2015) extends the I/E model to the formation of other domain-specific academic self-beliefs such as interest. Research on the validity of the (G)I/E model for elementary school children is limited, especially for first-graders. This study examined the associations between verbal and math achievement and corresponding domain-specific self-concepts and interests for first-graders and third-graders. Two fully representative Luxembourgish first-grader cohorts and two fully representative third-graders cohorts (N=21,192) were used. The analyses were based on structural equation modeling. The findings fully supported the (G)I/E model for third-graders: Achievement was positively related to self-concept and interest within matching domains. Negative relations were found between achievement and self-concept and between achievement and interest across domains. For first-graders, achievement was positively related to self-concept and interest within matching domains. However, the majority of cross-domain relations were non-significant, except for the negative path between math achievement and verbal interest. Hence, while the formation of domain-specific ASCs and interests seem to rely on social and dimensional comparisons for third-graders, only social comparisons seem to be in operation for first-graders. Gender and cohort invariance was established for both grade levels. The findings are discussed within the framework of ASC differentiation and dimensional comparison theory applied to elementary school students. [less ▲]

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See detailSoftware Engineering for Dataset Augmentation using Generative Adversarial Networks
Jahic, Benjamin UL; Guelfi, Nicolas UL; Ries, Benoît UL

Scientific Conference (2019, October 19)

Software engineers require a large amount of data for building neural network-based software systems. The engineering of these data is often neglected, though, it is a critical and time-consuming activity ... [more ▼]

Software engineers require a large amount of data for building neural network-based software systems. The engineering of these data is often neglected, though, it is a critical and time-consuming activity. In this work, we present a novel software engineering approach for dataset augmentation using neural networks. We propose a rigorous process for generating synthetic data to improve the training of neural networks. Also, we demonstrate our approach to successfully improve the recognition of handwritten digits using conditional generative adversarial networks (cGAN). Finally, we shortly discuss selected important issues of our process, presenting related work and proposing some improvements. [less ▲]

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See detailMonitoring du système scolaire – Le modèle luxembourgeois (invited talk)
Fischbach, Antoine UL

Scientific Conference (2019, October 17)

Detailed reference viewed: 36 (6 UL)
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See detailEFFECTS OF MULTIPLE OSCILLATOR PHASE NOISE IN PRECODING PERFORMANCE
Martinez Marrero, Liz UL

Scientific Conference (2019, October)

Satellite Precoding is a promising technique to meet the target data rates of the future high throughput satellite systems and the costs per bit as required by 5G applications and networks, but it ... [more ▼]

Satellite Precoding is a promising technique to meet the target data rates of the future high throughput satellite systems and the costs per bit as required by 5G applications and networks, but it requires strict synchronization among the transmitted waveforms, in addition to accurate channel state information. Most of the published work about this topic consider ideal oscillators, but in practice, the output of an oscillator is not a single spectral line at the nominal frequency. This paper proposes a model for the oscillator phase noise and analyzes the resulting received signal to interference plus noise ratio (SNIR) in a satellite communication system using Precoding. Simulations of a communication satellite system with a two-beam transponder and two receivers were performed to compute the effective SNIR. This work uses a simulator which also considers practical impairments such as time misalignment, errors in the channel state information, interference, thermal noise and phase noise masks for satellite oscillators. The Precoding methods used for the analysis are Zero Forcing (ZF) and Minimum Mean Square Error (MMSE). The obtained results prove that there is a degradation in the performance due to the use of independent oscillators but this effect is compensated by the precoding matrix. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 28 (3 UL)
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See detailP3LS : Plausible Deniability for Practical Privacy-Preserving Live Streaming
Decouchant, Jérémie UL; Boutet, Antoine; Yu, Jiangshan et al

Scientific Conference (2019, October)

Video consumption is one of the most popular Internet activities worldwide. The emergence of sharing videos directly recorded with smartphones raises important privacy concerns. In this paper we propose ... [more ▼]

Video consumption is one of the most popular Internet activities worldwide. The emergence of sharing videos directly recorded with smartphones raises important privacy concerns. In this paper we propose P3LS , the first practical privacy-preserving peer-to-peer live streaming system. To protect the privacy of its users, P3LS relies on k-anonymity when users subscribe to streams, and on plausible deniability for the dissemination of video streams. Specifically, plausible deniability during the dissemination phase ensures that an adversary is never able to distinguish a user’s stream of interest from the fake streams from a statistical analysis (i.e., using an analysis of variance). We exhaustively evaluate P3LS and show that adversaries are not able to identify the real stream of a user with very high confidence. Moreover, P3LS consumes 30% less bandwidth than the standard k-anonymity approach where nodes fully contribute to the dissemination of k streams. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 79 (9 UL)
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See detailHow To Attract And Retain Talents In Not-For-Profit Organizations?
Usanova, Ksenia; Telitsina, Aleksandra; Geraudel, Mickaël UL

Scientific Conference (2019, September 30)

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See detailThree models of flexible talent management
Usanova, Ksenia; Geraudel, Mickaël UL; D'Armagnac, Sophie et al

Scientific Conference (2019, September 30)

Detailed reference viewed: 27 (1 UL)
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See detailQualitative interviewing in multilingual research
Kalocsanyiova, Erika UL; Shatnawi, Malika

Scientific Conference (2019, September 27)

A growing body of research in super-diverse societies is conducted, by necessity, in multiple languages. Multilingual research practices can play a fundamental role in empowering participants and ... [more ▼]

A growing body of research in super-diverse societies is conducted, by necessity, in multiple languages. Multilingual research practices can play a fundamental role in empowering participants and privileging their voices, especially in migration-related studies. Yet, questions of cross-language interviewing are for the most part avoided or ignored in mainstream research. This contribution seeks to bring cross-language communication back into the focus of methodological discussions. Our paper builds on multilingual interview material extracted from a two-year linguistic ethnographic research project on forced migrants’ integration trajectories in Luxembourg. It looks at interpreter-mediated research encounters, as well as interviewees’ translation and translanguaging moves. Audio recordings and field notes from collaborative data analysis sessions underpin the data for this contribution. Our examples show that there is merit in fixing our analytical gaze on the minute details of language use across different codes, as these allow for a novel inquiry into specific moments of meaning making, role performances and rapport-building in qualitative interviewing. [less ▲]

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See detailTHE MARKET SKEWNESS-RETURN RELATIONSHIP, Plenary Talk
Lehnert, Thorsten UL

Scientific Conference (2019, September 25)

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See detailEarly-stage topological and technological choices for TSN-based communication architectures
Navet, Nicolas UL; Villanueva, Josetxo; Migge, Jörn

Scientific Conference (2019, September 24)

A main issue in the design of automotive communication architectures is that the most important design choices pertaining to the topology of the networks and the technologies to use (protocols, data rate ... [more ▼]

A main issue in the design of automotive communication architectures is that the most important design choices pertaining to the topology of the networks and the technologies to use (protocols, data rate, hardware) have to be made at a time when the communication requirements are not entirely known. Indeed, many functions only becomes available along the development cycle, and vehicle platforms have to support incremental evolutions of the embedded system that may not be fully foreseeable at the time design choices are made. The problem is becoming even more difficult and crucial with the introduction of dynamically evolving communication requirements requiring network re-configuration at run-time. We present how the use of synthetic data, that is data generated programmatically based on past vehicle projects and what can be foreseen for the current project, enables the designers to make such early stage choices based on quantified metrics. The proposals are applied to Groupe Renault's FACE service-oriented E/E architecture with the use of a software-implemented function we called “Topology Stress Test”. [less ▲]

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See detailProceedings of the Deduktionstreffen 2019
Schon, Claudia; Steen, Alexander UL

Scientific Conference (2019, September 23)

The annual meeting Deduktionstreffen is the prime activity of the Special Interest Group on Deduction Systems (FG DedSys) of the AI Section of the German Society for Informatics (GI-FBKI). It is a meeting ... [more ▼]

The annual meeting Deduktionstreffen is the prime activity of the Special Interest Group on Deduction Systems (FG DedSys) of the AI Section of the German Society for Informatics (GI-FBKI). It is a meeting with a familiar, friendly atmosphere, where everyone interested in deduction can report on their work in an informal setting. [less ▲]

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See detail(Im)mobilizing languages
Kalocsanyiova, Erika UL

Scientific Conference (2019, September 19)

This presentation is concerned with the impact of multilingualism on forced migrants’ trajectories. It reports the findings of a two-year qualitative research project, which used ethnographic research ... [more ▼]

This presentation is concerned with the impact of multilingualism on forced migrants’ trajectories. It reports the findings of a two-year qualitative research project, which used ethnographic research methods, including narrative and go-along interviews, classroom and participant observations and linguistic analysis of interactional data. The project set out to investigate how forced migrants reflect, position, and affirm themselves – through languages – in multilingual societies. Our contribution aligns itself with the body of research that challenges hegemonic monolingual and monocultural practices (Grzymala-Kazlowska/Phillimore 2018, Van Avermaet 2009). Other major influences were Juffermans and Tavares’s (2017) research on south-north trajectories and linguistic repertoires, Stevenson’s (2014, 2017) work on language (hi)stories and Busch’s (2017) biographical explorations of Spracherleben. In this talk, the focus will be on the experiences of three men from Syria and Iraq who have obtained humanitarian protection in Luxembourg, but aspire to fulfil their integration aspirations across multiple locations and countries. A careful analysis of divergent trajectories sheds light on how experiences of linguistic inequality and/or success are imprinted on forced migrants’ repertoires and shape their understanding of (successful) integration. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 27 (0 UL)
See detailWann kam die Grenze auf die Karte? Zur Konstruktion von Herrschaftsgebieten zwischen Reich und Frankreich in der Frühen Neuzeit
Uhrmacher, Martin UL

Scientific Conference (2019, September 19)

Feste politische Grenzen, wie man sie heute kennt, die ein Staatsgebiet nach innen wie nach außen umfassend begrenzen, sind im Raum zwischen Maas und Rhein ein Produkt des späten 18. Jahrhunderts. Für ... [more ▼]

Feste politische Grenzen, wie man sie heute kennt, die ein Staatsgebiet nach innen wie nach außen umfassend begrenzen, sind im Raum zwischen Maas und Rhein ein Produkt des späten 18. Jahrhunderts. Für diese Region wird nach dem Ursprung dieser festen Grenzlinien gesucht, die heute ein selbstverständlicher Bestandteil von Karten sind. Seit dem späten 16. Jahrhundert wurden im Westen des Heiligen Römischen Reiches erstmals historische Karten publiziert und im Druck verbreitet, die unser Bild der territorialen Landschaft bis heute prägen. Ab wann aber werden solche Grenzlinien zur Darstellung territorial-räumlicher Verhältnisse verwendet? Und welche Rolle kommt ihnen bei der Konstruktion von Herrschaft im Raum zu? Diesen Fragen widmet sich der Beitrag für die Region zwischen Maas und Rhein. Sie liegt an der Schnittstelle von Germania und Romania und ist durch Einflüsse beiderseits der Sprachgrenze geprägt. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 24 (0 UL)
See detailSize-dependent spatial magnetization profile of Manganese-Zinc ferrite nanoparticles
Bersweiler, Mathias UL

Scientific Conference (2019, September 18)

Detailed reference viewed: 26 (0 UL)
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See detailMale vs female gamers: Testing the stereotype threat effect in video gaming
Holl, Elisabeth UL; Wagener, Gary Lee; Melzer, André UL

Scientific Conference (2019, September 17)

Stereotype threat (ST), defined as the risk of confirming a negative stereotype about one’s own group, has been demonstrated in various social contexts. Regarding video games, for example, informing ... [more ▼]

Stereotype threat (ST), defined as the risk of confirming a negative stereotype about one’s own group, has been demonstrated in various social contexts. Regarding video games, for example, informing female participants that men would outperform women in gaming leads to gender differences in performance. To date, however, these studies have not looked into the mechanisms of this ST effect in gaming. In two lab studies (N=186), some participants were confronted with ST-related information before playing a video game. In Study 1, half of the participants read a bogus article confirming the “standard” gender stereotype (“men outperform women”). In Study 2, a reverse stereotype was presented to half of the participants (“women have outpaced men in some game genres”). In contrast to hypotheses, both studies failed to show the expected significant interaction effect of gender and ST condition on performance, although female participants confronted with the “standard” gender stereotype reported greater frustration in Study 1, for example. In sum, results indicate a complex relationship between gender, social identity, experience with the game genre, and behavior. Identifying oneself as a gamer and being experienced in a particular game genre were found to be better performance predictors than reading stereotype threatening information. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 34 (1 UL)
See detailSocial stratification in higher education trajectories: A sequence-analytical approach
Haas, Christina UL

Scientific Conference (2019, September 13)

Detailed reference viewed: 34 (1 UL)
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See detailDifferences in physical activity among children with physically active and inactive parents
Eckelt, Melanie UL; Hutmacher, Djenna UL; Steffgen, Georges UL et al

Scientific Conference (2019, September 13)

Objectives: Parental physical activity is considered as positively related to children´s physical activity (PA; Sallis, Prochaska & Taylor, 2000). Since parents serve as role models, have the potential to ... [more ▼]

Objectives: Parental physical activity is considered as positively related to children´s physical activity (PA; Sallis, Prochaska & Taylor, 2000). Since parents serve as role models, have the potential to influence the health-related behavior and, for instance, to alter a mainly sedentary lifestyle of their children (Beets, Cardinal & Alderman, 2010), the impact of parental PA has become a key issue in research. Many studies report associations between parental PA and the PA behavior of their children, e.g., the direct involvement of the parents in activities with their children is related to increased levels of their PA (Adkins, Sherwood, Story, & Davis, 2004; Beets, Vogel, Chapman, Pitetti, & Cardinal, 2007). However, the mechanisms of parental influence are still poorly understood and besides recent studies are based on self-reported data. Therefore, this study aims to examine if parental PA is related to the subjectively and objectively measured PA of their children. Methods: 237 Luxembourgish children and adolescents (134 girls and 103 boys) aged from 10-18 years participated in the study. Via a digital questionnaire, the children indicated if their mother and father are physically active on a regular basis and if they are active together with their parents. Furthermore, the children and adolescents indicated if they are active at least 60 minutes/ day and if they own a membership in a sports club (MoMo physical activity questionnaire). Additionally, children’s PA behavior was objectively assessed by wearing an accelerometer (ActiGraph GT3X-BT) for a period of seven consecutive days. Activity was categorized as sedentary, light physical activity or moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA) using age-specific thresholds. Results: A multivariate ANOVA revealed significant differences in self-reported physical activity if the mother was physically active (F (2, 166) = 5.4, p < .01). Thus, children reported subjectively higher daily activity duration (p < .05) and more activities in a regular week (p < .01). There was no impact on self-reported PA if the father was active or the children were active with their parents together. Regarding the objective data, there were no significant differences between children with active parents and children with inactive parents. If the parents were active with their children together there were significant differences (F (3, 229) = 3.2, p < .05), thus MVPA per day was higher (p < .05) and the sedentary time was lower (p < .01). Neither subjective nor objective data revealed gender-specific differences. Discussion: In contrast to other studies, only the mother seems to have an influence on the subjective PA behavior of the children. The fact, that parents being active or in a sports club does not appear to enhance the PA of the children objectively. However, the objective PA is merely affected by being active together. According to this finding, joint activities of parents and children seem to be necessary to promote children’s PA effectively. It is important to note that in our study the parental PA was rated by the children. In future studies, parents should be included via self-report questionnaires and/or accelerometer. [less ▲]

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See detailDigital History as Trading Zone? Reflections from a Doctoral Training Unit
van der Heijden, Tim UL

Scientific Conference (2019, September 12)

This paper addresses the question how Digital History “trading zones” are being constituted in practice and how they are situated in physical working environments. The analysis is based on a case study of ... [more ▼]

This paper addresses the question how Digital History “trading zones” are being constituted in practice and how they are situated in physical working environments. The analysis is based on a case study of the Doctoral Training Unit (DTU) “Digital History and Hermeneutics”, an interdisciplinary research and training programme that was established at the Luxembourg Centre for Contemporary and Digital History (C²DH) of the University of Luxembourg. The DTU is designed as an interdisciplinary “trading zone”, in which thirteen doctoral candidates with different disciplinary backgrounds – from history, linguistics and philosophy to computer and information science – reflect on the epistemological and methodological challenges of doing digital history and humanities research (Fickers 2015, 2012). The paper reflects on the project’s first year, in which the doctoral researchers were introduced to various skills and methods in digital humanities as part of the so-called “DH incubation phase”. This phase included trainings in text mining, digital source criticism, database structures, data visualization, GIS analysis, tool criticism and algorithmic critique. The paper presents some of the main practical and epistemological opportunities and challenges of “thinkering”: the playful experimentation with digital tools and technologies for doing historical research. It furthermore reflects on the practical and institutional challenges of constituting an interdisciplinary trading zone, like the DTU. As such, it addresses a number of critical questions: How to build bridges between different knowledge domains in a specific research environment? How to stimulate interdisciplinary collaboration and to get scholars out of their disciplinary or methodological comfort zones? What is at stake in such interdisciplinary trading zones? Who are the traders – and what is being traded? The analysis is informed by studies on interdisciplinarity (Klein 2015, Deegan and McCarty 2012, Stehr and Weingart 2000), trading zones (Collins et al. 2007, Galison 1996, Kemman 2019) and communities of practice (Wenger 1998). Empirically, it draws on a series of semi-structured interviews and thirty-nine self-reflexive training reports, in which the doctoral researchers of the DTU discuss their experiences of doing digital history and hermeneutics in an interdisciplinary setting. Finally, the paper evaluates the suitability of the trading zone concept as analytical framework for studying interdisciplinary collaborations in Digital History as a field. [less ▲]

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See detailIncome Inequality and the Strength of the Origins-Health Gradient in 20 European Countries
Chauvel, Louis UL; Bar-Haim, Eyal UL; Leist, Anja UL

Scientific Conference (2019, September 12)

Health is determined by socio-economic position not only of the individual, but also by that of their parents. The intergenerational transmission of health via parental socioeconomic status is suggested ... [more ▼]

Health is determined by socio-economic position not only of the individual, but also by that of their parents. The intergenerational transmission of health via parental socioeconomic status is suggested to vary according to contextual factors such as income inequality. Earlier studies with a comparative perspective had a limited number of countries available. This study uses 20 countries at up to five waves from the European Social Survey (2008-2016) and SWIID in order to examine the extent to which income inequality is related to the origins-health gradient. The higher the income inequality of a given country and year, the stronger the origins-health gradient. Contrary to earlier findings, this association can be fully explained by intergenerational transmission of status, i.e. education. Implications of this finding are that health is largely determined by educational attainment and associated health behaviors, giving societal context a less prominent role than earlier studies suggested. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 41 (4 UL)
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See detailA comparison between conventional Earth Observation Satellites and CubeSats; Requirements, Capabilities and Data Quality
Backes, Dietmar UL; Hassani, Saif Alislam UL; Teferle, Felix Norman UL et al

Scientific Conference (2019, September 11)

From its early beginning as an educational tool in 1999, cubesats have evolved into a popular platform for technology demonstrations and scientific instruments. Ideas and innovations sparked from an ... [more ▼]

From its early beginning as an educational tool in 1999, cubesats have evolved into a popular platform for technology demonstrations and scientific instruments. Ideas and innovations sparked from an enthusiastic community led to the development of new Earth Observation (EO) technology concepts based on large constellations of satellites with high-resolution optical imagers previously considered as infeasible. Probably the most significant constellation today is deployed by Planet who are currently operating a fleet larger than 120 3U Dove satellites, which provide an imaging service with up to 3m Ground Sample Distance (GSD). The number of low-cost EO Cubesat systems is constantly increasing. However, for a number of reasons there still seems to be a reluctance to use such data for many EO applications. A better understanding of the capabilities of the current generation of small Cubesats compared to the traditional well-established bigger operational missions of high and medium resolution EO satellites is required. What are the critical capabilities and quality indicators? Due to the limited size and weight of Cubesats, critical system components, e.g. for navigation and communication, always compete with operational payloads such as optical camera/sensor systems. A functional EO system requires balanced payload, which provides adequate navigational capabilities, that match the requirements of the optical imagers (camera) deployed with the system. This study reviews the current performance and capabilities of Cubesats for optical EO and compares them to the capabilities of conventional, dedicated high and medium resolution EO systems. We summarise key performance parameters and quality indicators to evaluate the difference between the systems. An empirical study compares recent very high-resolution (VHR) imagery from big EO satellite missions with available images from Cubesats for the use case in disaster monitoring. Small and agile Nanosatellites or Cubesats already show remarkable performance. Although it is not expected that their performance and capability will match those of current bigger EO satellite missions, they are expected to provide a valuable tool for EO and remote sensing, in particular for downstream industry applications. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 73 (22 UL)
See detailSome naturally defined star products for Kaehler manifolds
Schlichenmaier, Martin UL

Scientific Conference (2019, September 10)

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See detailImplicit attitudes and stereotypes concerning male and female ethnic minority students
Pit-Ten Cate, Ineke UL; Krischler, Mireille UL

Scientific Conference (2019, September 10)

Stereotypes and attitudes influence behavior and hence contribute to the integration of students from different backgrounds. Stereotypes reflect beliefs about the members of social groups (Fiske & Taylor ... [more ▼]

Stereotypes and attitudes influence behavior and hence contribute to the integration of students from different backgrounds. Stereotypes reflect beliefs about the members of social groups (Fiske & Taylor, 1991) and are associated with expectations, which in turn effect perception and judgments (Ferguson, 2003). Person perceptions- and judgments are however also affected by evaluations of objects (Sanbonmatsu & Fazio, 1990). Based on people´s stereotypical beliefs and associated thoughts and feelings, specific behavioral intentions develop and hence both may be pivotal for the level of acceptance or rejection of others. Research shows that stigmatization based on ethnicity can provide a barrier in terms of both social integration (MENJE, 2015) and educational equity (Gabel, et al., 2009). The current study aimed to assess young peoples´ implicit attitudes and stereotypes concerning male and female students from different ethnic backgrounds (German vs. Turkish). Implicit attitudes were measured using an implicit association task (IAT; Greenwald, et al., 2003). First names were used as a proxy for the ethnic background of the student. Participants (N=98) were randomly divided in two groups, completing either an IAT-boys version or an IAT-girls version. Stereotypes, in terms of students´ academic engagement were assessed using a questionnaire (Hachfeld, et al., 2012). Mean IAT-D scores for boys and girls did not differ, t(89)=1.05, p=.30. The IAT-D score for the whole sample (M=0.33, SD=1.28) was significantly different from zero, t(90)=2.46, p=.02, d=0.26, reflecting more negative implicit attitudes toward students with Turkish roots. Participants did not express differential stereotypical beliefs regarding the students´ academic engagement based on students´ ethnic background (i.e., subscale scores were significantly lower than the mean of the scale, t(88)=6.00, p<.001, d=0.64). No correlation was found between implicit attitudes and stereotypical beliefs (r=.12, n.s.). People´s implicit attitudes in favor of students from ethnic majorities may result in differential social interactions with students from different backgrounds (less acceptance of students with ethnic minority backgrounds). The dissociation between implicit attitudes and explicit stereotypical beliefs may reflect the social sensitivity of the relationship between students´ background and educational opportunities. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 17 (2 UL)
See detailExamining grades, achievement test scores, and three intelligence facets within an extended I/E model
Hausen, Jennifer UL; Möller, Jens; Greiff, Samuel UL et al

Scientific Conference (2019, September 10)

Domain-specific academic self-concepts (ASCs) are mental representations of one’s abilities that are specific to a particular school subject. According to the internal/external frame of reference (I/E ... [more ▼]

Domain-specific academic self-concepts (ASCs) are mental representations of one’s abilities that are specific to a particular school subject. According to the internal/external frame of reference (I/E) model, achievement influences the formation of ASCs via social and dimensional comparison processes: within one domain students not only compare their achievement with their peers (social comparison) but also with their own achievements in other domains (dimensional comparison). However, students’ intelligence as an indicator of achievement has been neglected within the I/E model framework. Yet, intelligence is known to be an important determinant of academic success and thus it can be assumed to influence the formation of academic self-concepts, too. Hence, this research examined the links between verbal, numerical, figural intelligence and domain-specific ASCs while controlling for grades and achievement test scores. We drew on N = 382 German students to analyze verbal, numerical, and figural intelligence, German and math achievement, domain-specific self-reported grades and ASCs in math, physics, German, and English. We performed structural equation modeling using Mplus 8 with grades, achievement scores and intelligence facets specified as manifest predictors and domain-specific ASCs as latent criteria. Positive within-domain relations indicating social comparison effects were found between math, physics, German, and English grade to their corresponding self-concept as well as from math achievement to math ASC. Dimensional comparison effects are implied by a positive cross-domain path between physics grade and math ASC and by negative cross-domain paths from math grade to German, physics, and English ASC. Further, a positive cross-domain relation was found between math achievement and physics ASC while a negative cross-domain path was found between German achievement and math ASC. With regard to the intelligence facets, positive paths were found between numerical intelligence and physics ASC as well as between verbal intelligence and English ASC. Our findings thus suggest numerical and verbal intelligence to be valid predictors of ASC formation in an extended I/E model beyond grades and test scores. Overall, the proposed I/E model permitted meaningful relations to be drawn between domain-specific achievement indicators and ASCs suggesting that these variables provide incremental validity. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 31 (1 UL)
See detailThe long and winding road: analysing Science and Innovation Centres, a unique policy instrument of Science Diplomacy
Epping, Elisabeth UL

Scientific Conference (2019, September 05)

The aim of this paper is to empirically contribute to the study of science diplomacy and thereby introduce and analyse science and innovation centres (SIC) as a novel policy instrument in the science ... [more ▼]

The aim of this paper is to empirically contribute to the study of science diplomacy and thereby introduce and analyse science and innovation centres (SIC) as a novel policy instrument in the science diplomacy toolbox. SIC are distinct units or satellite institutes, established by governments abroad, operating at the nexus of higher education, research, innovation and diplomacy. Based on a comparative analysis of policy documents and interview data, insights into the development of SIC in Germany and Switzerland are generated. Furthermore, the (changing) political rationales that guide their development, and hence science diplomacy in general, are distilled. By applying a policy instrumentation lens, the research 1) uncovers the development of the two SIC over time reflecting similarities and differences, 2) shows that the political rationales for SIC are changing and exceed dominant science diplomacy notions of soft power, 3) reveals that the promotion of the concept of science diplomacy reflects a certain Zeitgeist and rather than being a novelty, existing practices are relabelled as science diplomacy. [less ▲]

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See detailWireless Multi-group Multicast Precoding with Selective RF Energy Harvesting
Gautam, Sumit UL; Lagunas, Eva UL; Chatzinotas, Symeon UL et al

Scientific Conference (2019, September 05)

We present a novel framework for multi-group multicast precoding in the presence of three types of wireless users which are distributed among various multicast groups. A multi-antenna transmitter conveys ... [more ▼]

We present a novel framework for multi-group multicast precoding in the presence of three types of wireless users which are distributed among various multicast groups. A multi-antenna transmitter conveys information and/or energy to the groups of corresponding receivers using more than one multicast streams. The information specific users have conventional receiver architectures to process data, energy harvesting users collect energy using the non-linear energy harvesting module and each of the joint information decoding and energy harvesting capable user is assumed to employ the separated architecture with disparate non-linear energy harvesting and conventional information decoding units. In this context, we formulate and analyze the problem of total transmit power minimization for optimal precoder design subjected to minimum signal-to-interference-and-noise ratio and harvested energy demands at the respective users under three different scenarios. This problem is solved via semi-definite relaxation and the advantages of employing separate information and energy precoders are shown over joint and per-user information and energy precoder designs. Simulation results illustrate the benefits of proposed framework under several operating conditions and parameter values. [less ▲]

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See detail„Verachtet mir die Meister nicht!“ Kulturelle Botschafter in Luxemburg. Laurent Menager und Asca Rampini
Sagrillo, Damien UL

Scientific Conference (2019, September 03)

Der kubanische Anthropologe Ferdinand Ortiz prägte im Jahr 1940 den Begriff der „transculturación“, welcher – grob zusammengefasst – den Übergangsprozess von einer Kultur zur anderen beschreibt. In den ... [more ▼]

Der kubanische Anthropologe Ferdinand Ortiz prägte im Jahr 1940 den Begriff der „transculturación“, welcher – grob zusammengefasst – den Übergangsprozess von einer Kultur zur anderen beschreibt. In den Neunzigerjahren hat der deutsche Philosoph Wolfgang Welsch die Idee wieder aufgenommen, den Begriff jedoch in Transkulturalität umbenannt. Was sich bei Welsch als eine Bereicherung anhört – die (unter dem luxemburgischen Begriff so genannte) Mixität verschiedener Kulturen –, liest sich bei Ortiz teilweise als Aufgabe bzw. Verlust. In meinem Vortrag geht es um die zwei luxemburgische Komponisten Laurent Menager (1835-1902) und Asca Rampini (1931-1999). Auf den ersten Blick haben beide nicht viel gemeinsam, doch hinsichtlich des oben angesprochenen Diskurses zwischen Transkulturalität und Verlust wird ein Ineinandergreifen erkennbar, das beispielhaft für andere (Blasmusik-)Komponisten regionaler Reputation sein könnte: das In-die-Vergessenheit-fallen ihrer jeweiligen Lebensleistungen, die viel mit Integration und gegenseitigen kulturellen Beeinflussungen zu tun haben. Der Fingerzeig Wagners, die Meister nicht zu vergessen, mag teilweise Abhilfe schaffen. [less ▲]

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See detailLiving up to High Expectations? Effective Enforcement of the European Pillar of Social Rights
Muñoz, Susana UL

Scientific Conference (2019, September 03)

The recent multidimensional crisis has provided opportunities for renewal and innovation at various levels of EU law and policy making and enforcement. Against this backdrop, policy areas connected with ... [more ▼]

The recent multidimensional crisis has provided opportunities for renewal and innovation at various levels of EU law and policy making and enforcement. Against this backdrop, policy areas connected with the EU social dimension face both general and policy-specific challenges in the complex network of existing enforcement strategies and tools in the EU legal order. This paper aims to provide a critical analysis of the EPRS as a potential driver of change in this context. [less ▲]

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See detailINTERGENERATIONAL VALUE TRANSMISSION AND THE ROLE OF MOTIVATIONAL PROCESSES IN MIGRANT AND NON-MIGRANT FAMILIES
Albert, Isabelle UL; Barros, Stephanie; Coimbra, Susana

Scientific Conference (2019, September 01)

The intergenerational transmission of values from one generation to the next is essential for the continuity of a society as it facilitates communication between members of different generations and ... [more ▼]

The intergenerational transmission of values from one generation to the next is essential for the continuity of a society as it facilitates communication between members of different generations and within families, where shared values constitute a part of the family identity. In the context of acculturation, traditions can provide a secure base for migrants who have to adapt to a new living context. On the one hand, parents in migrant families might find it particularly important to transmit traditional values to the next generation, on the other hand offspring can be confronted with diverse value orientations in the receiving culture, and therefore special efforts might be needed to transmit traditional values. The current study is part of the larger FNR-funded IRMA project and presents a crosscultural comparison of n = 154 triads of parents and their (young) adult children from Luxembourgish native and Portuguese immigrant families in Luxembourg, as well as a subsample of Portuguese families living in Portugal. Participants from both generations filled out a standardized questionnaire assessing general value orientations, perceived value similarity as well as parental motivation to transmit respectively children’s motivation to take over parental values. Results showed that parental motivation to transmit values was particularly high in Portuguese families (in Portugal and Luxembourg), although no differences in perceived value similarity between the three subsamples occurred. Whereas parental motivation for transmission was related to the value of tradition in all three subsamples, perceived similarity between parents and their adult children was related to their selforiented values. Concerning consensus in value profiles, the role of motivational processes will be further explored, and effects of culture and migration will be discussed in an integrative framework of intergenerational relations in light of migration and ageing. [less ▲]

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See detailSymposium: INTERGENERATIONAL VALUE TRANSMISSION: THE ROLE OF MOTIVES, TRANSITIONS, AND CONTEXT
Albert, Isabelle UL

Scientific Conference (2019, September 01)

Cultural transmission refers to the transfer of knowledge, practices, values and norms through processes of socialization, enculturation and acculturation which can be intentional or implicit ... [more ▼]

Cultural transmission refers to the transfer of knowledge, practices, values and norms through processes of socialization, enculturation and acculturation which can be intentional or implicit. Intergenerational transmission occurs to a large extent within the family as primary socialization agent. Apart from that, values and norms are learnt in contact with peers and friends, in school or through media. Although the last years have seen an increased research interest in these topics, mechanisms are still unclear and open questions remain with regard to moderators of transmission. The present symposium brings together researchers from three different countries – Germany, Italy and Luxembourg – who will focus on factors that might have an impact on intergenerational value transmission at different points in the family life cycle and outside the family. First, Daniela Barni and colleagues examine the impact of relationship quality toward mothers and fathers on adolescents’ motives for internalization of moral values, thereby taking age of adolescents into account. Christian Hoellger and colleagues then focus on later points in the family life cycle. Taking into account specific life course transitions, they find differences in value transmission, which are however moderated by adult children’s gender. Third, Isabelle Albert and colleagues concentrate on intergenerational transmission of values in the context of acculturation, taking into account parental motivation to transmit values in a sample of Portuguese immigrant compared to non-immigrant families with adult children. Finally, Elke Murdock and Maria Stogianni analyze the roles of friendship patterns for the development of ethnic identity of adolescents who live in a culturally highly diverse setting, underlining the importance of experiences in individuals’ biographies in specific contexts that shape their further development. The discussion will focus on the importance of motives to transmit or take over values, context variables and transitions for intergenerational transmission of values within and outside the family. [less ▲]

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See detailMulticultural societies - and the disappearance of culture?
Murdock, Elke UL; Stogianni, Maria UL

Scientific Conference (2019, September 01)

Vertovec (2007) describes countries with a heterogeneous population in terms of origin and migration status as super-diverse. Within these plurally composed societies the boundaries between minority and ... [more ▼]

Vertovec (2007) describes countries with a heterogeneous population in terms of origin and migration status as super-diverse. Within these plurally composed societies the boundaries between minority and majority become blurred and norms, values and symbols may be negotiated dependent on context. For people growing up in such a multicultural context it is the norm to be with people of different cultural backgrounds and language skills. Reinders (2006) has introduced the term co-culturation, as distinct from enculturation and acculturation, to describe the process of engagement with cultural diversity by both, natives and those with migration background. In a sample of adolescents growing up in multicultural Luxembourg, we highlight the interplay between migration status, friendship patterns, family relations, well-being and identity. Students (N = 85) attending a Luxembourgish secondary school participated in this questionnaire study (Mage = 16.45, SD = 1.09, 46 male, 39 female). The majority (n = 68) of the students were born in Luxembourg, 17 are natives (born to two Luxembourgish parents), 43 are second generation, 17 first generation and 6 are of mixed parentage. We assessed language competence and use, friendship patterns and family relationships. Measures also included the Brief Multidimensional Students’ Life Satisfaction Scales (BMSLSS) which assesses satisfaction with life in different domains and the Multigroup Ethnic Identity Measure (MEIM) scale. The results indicate that friendship patterns are formed on the basis of the characteristics of the individual rather than based on the country of origin. Few statistically significant differences could be found in terms of country of origin/ migration status and various outcome measures. The results can be interpreted in the co-culturation framework. For this cohort of adolescents, culture contact is the norm and salience of cultural background appears to weaken as a result. However, the Luxembourgish language plays an important unifying role. [less ▲]

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See detailTrends in cannabis consumption among youth in Luxembourg
Catunda, Carolina UL; van Duin, Claire UL; Heinz, Andreas UL et al

Scientific Conference (2019, September)

Background: Cannabis is the most widely consumed illegal drug worldwide. Among adolescents, cannabis use is a risk factor for cognitive decline, mental illness, social problems, and the use of other ... [more ▼]

Background: Cannabis is the most widely consumed illegal drug worldwide. Among adolescents, cannabis use is a risk factor for cognitive decline, mental illness, social problems, and the use of other psychoactive drugs. The current study presents trends in cannabis consumption among adolescents in Luxembourg. Methods: The Health Behaviour in School Aged Children (HBSC) Study in Luxembourg collected data in 2006, 2010, 2014 and 2018 using a standardized paper-pencil questionnaire. In total, 23,346 secondary schools students aged 11 to 18 years old (M=15.51, SD=1.53) responded to questions on cannabis, tobacco and alcohol consumption (lifetime and the past 30 days). Findings: In general, students who never used cannabis significantly increased over the four HBSC study waves (78%, 81.2%, 81%, 84%), whereas trends are similar for boys (74.5%, 77%, 78.2%, 81.4%), but not for girls (81.5%, 85%, 83.2%, 86.3%). Cannabis use (past 30 days) significantly differ for girls (94.1%, 94.1%, 92.8%, 93.7%), but not in general (91.7%, 92%, 90.9%, 91.7%), neither for boys (89.3%, 90.1%, 88.6%, 89.6%). Discussion: Cannabis lifetime use remains high for both genders. While consumption in the last 30 days remained stable for boys, it increased for girls over the past years. Tailored preventive interventions, based on health psychological models, are essential to educate adolescents about the social-cognitive risks of cannabis use and strengthen their capacities and resilience to resist experimental drug use and social pressure. In a context where legalization policies are discussed in various European countries, e-health approaches, for example, could be widely implemented in a cost-effective manner. [less ▲]

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See detailDie Stabilität von akademischen Selbstkonzept-Profilen: Befunde einer „latent transition analysis“
Franzen, Patrick UL; Arens, A Katrin; Niepel, Christoph UL

Scientific Conference (2019, September)

Nach dem „internal-external frame of reference“ Modell (Marsh, 1986), spielen u.a. dimensionale Vergleiche (Vergleich der eigenen Leistung in einem Fach mit der eigenen Leistung in einem anderen Fach ... [more ▼]

Nach dem „internal-external frame of reference“ Modell (Marsh, 1986), spielen u.a. dimensionale Vergleiche (Vergleich der eigenen Leistung in einem Fach mit der eigenen Leistung in einem anderen Fach) eine Rolle für die Ausbildung fachspezifischer akademischer Selbstkonzepte (ASKs). Dabei kommt es zu Kontrasteffekten: Eine gute Leistung in Mathematik stärkt das Mathematik-ASK, schwächt aber das Deutsch-ASK und vice versa. Schüler schätzen sich daher oft als fähiger in einem der beiden Fächer ein. Diese Typisierung ließ sich auch in personenzentrierten Ansätzen zeigen. Eine Profilanalyse von Marsh, Lüdtke, Trautwein und Morin (2009) ergab, dass ASK-Profile entweder einem Mathematik-Typ (höheres Mathe-ASK, niedrigeres Sprach-ASK), einem Sprach-Typ (niedrigeres Mathe-ASK, höheres Sprach-ASK) oder einem Mischtyp (gleich hohe ASKs in allen Domänen) folgten. Ob diese Profile über die Zeit hinweg stabil sind oder Schüler in Abhängigkeit ihrer Erfahrungen im Schulalltag zwischen den Typen wechseln können, ist bisher unklar. Ziel der vorliegenden Studie ist es, diese Frage zu beantworten. Eine Stichprobe von N = 382 Schülern aus 18 Klassen und vier Bundesländern beantwortete einen Fragebogen zum Mathematik-, Physik-, Deutsch- und Englisch-ASK an zwei Messzeitpunkten, mit einem Intervall von vier Wochen. Eine „latent transition analysis“ ergab eine Vier-State Lösung (BIC = 7797.8, Entropie = 0.884). Die vier States beschrieben einen Mathematik-Typ (höhere ASKs in Mathematik und Physik, niedrigere ASKs in Deutsch und Englisch), einen Sprach-Typ (höhere ASKs in Deutsch und Englisch, niedrigere ASKs in Mathematik und Physik), und zwei Mischtypen (gleich hohe ASKs für alle Fächer mit generell höheren ASKs bzw. niedrigeren ASKs). Die Ergebnisse zeigten eine hohe Stabilität der States: Alle Personen wurden an beiden Messzeitpunkten demselben State zugewiesen; die Transitionswahrscheinlichkeiten lagen bei 0% bis 5%. Weitere Ergebnisse zur Stabilität von ASK-Profilen bei noch kürzeren Zeitabständen, basierend auf „Experience Sampling“ Daten, werden diskutiert. Marsh, H.W. (1986). Verbal and math self-concepts: An internal/external frame of reference model. American Educational Research Journal, 23, 129-149. Marsh, H.W., Lüdtke, O., Trautwein, U., & Morin, A.J.S. (2009). Classical latent profile analysis of academic self-concept dimensions: Synergy of person- and variable-centered approaches to theoretical models of self-concept. Structural Equation Modeling, 16, 191–225. [less ▲]

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See detailEntwicklung und Validierung eines Kurzfragebogens zur Erfassung von sieben Facetten von Gewissenhaftigkeit
Franzen, Patrick UL; Niepel, Christoph UL; Arens, A Katrin et al

Scientific Conference (2019, September)

Die Rolle von Persönlichkeitsvariablen für den Schulerfolg rückt immer stärker in den Fokus wissenschaftlicher Untersuchungen. Insbesondere Gewissenhaftigkeit zeigt eine hohe prädiktive Validität für die ... [more ▼]

Die Rolle von Persönlichkeitsvariablen für den Schulerfolg rückt immer stärker in den Fokus wissenschaftlicher Untersuchungen. Insbesondere Gewissenhaftigkeit zeigt eine hohe prädiktive Validität für die Schulleistung (Poropat, 2009). Zur näheren Untersuchung des Konstrukts der Gewissenhaft haben MacCann, Duckworth und Roberts (2009) einen aus 68 Items bestehenden Fragebogen zur Erfassung von acht verschiedenen Facetten von Gewissenhaftigkeit im Sekundarschulalter entwickelt. Dieser ist jedoch zu umfangreich für die Verwendung in large-scale Studien, die in der pädagogischen Forschung von zunehmender Bedeutung sind. Der vorliegende Beitrag präsentiert daher die Entwicklung und Validierung einer Kurzform eines Fragebogens zur Erfassung von sieben Facetten von Gewissenhaftigkeit. Die Entwicklungsstichprobe umfasste die Schüler aller neunten Klassen in Luxemburg in 2017 (N1 = 6.325). Die Schüler beantworteten deutsche oder französische Adaptionen eines aus 59 Items und sieben Facetten bestehenden Fragebogens zu Gewissenhaftigkeit, der an das Instrument von MacCann et al. angelehnt war. Zur Entwicklung einer Kurzversion wurde ein exhaustive-search Algorithmus verwendet. Dabei sollte für jede Facette von Gewissenhaftigkeit die bestmögliche Kombination aus vier Items ausgewählt werden. Die Selektionskriterien hierfür waren Fit-Statistiken, interne Konsistenz und Messinvarianz zwischen den Sprachversionen. Der resultierende Fragebogen – bestehend aus 28 Items – wurde 2018 den Schülern aller neunten Klassen in Luxemburg vorgelegt (N2 =6.279). Für diese Validierungsstichprobe zeigte ein Modell mit sieben Faktoren von Gewissenhaftigkeit einen guten Fit (CFI = 0.93, RMSEA = 0.04). Alle Facetten hatten sehr gute Reliabilitäten (ɑs > 0.97). Außerdem fanden wir skalare Messinvarianz zwischen den Sprachversionen und zwischen beiden Geschlechtern. Weitere Validierungsschritte und Anwendungsmöglichkeiten dieses Fragebogens im schulischen Kontext werden diskutiert. Literatur MacCann, C., Duckworth, A.L., & Roberts, R.D. (2009). Empirical identification of the major facets of conscientiousness. Learning and Individual Differences, 19, 451–458. Poropat, A.E. (2009). A meta-analysis of the five-factor model of personality and academic performance. Psychological Bulletin, 135, 322–338. [less ▲]

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See detailValue-added models: To what extent do estimates of school effectiveness depend on the selection of covariates?
Levy, Jessica UL; Brunner, Martin; Keller, Ulrich UL et al

Scientific Conference (2019, September)

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See detailEffect of firm regulatory focus on risk disclosure: Evidence from UK strategic reports
Weber, Véronique UL

Scientific Conference (2019, August 29)

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See detailFear and Euphoria
Lehnert, Thorsten UL

Scientific Conference (2019, August 28)

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See detailPotential of the Deformation Area Difference (DAD)-Method for Condition Assessment of Bridge Structures
Waldmann, Danièle UL; Erdenebat, Dolgion UL

Scientific Conference (2019, August 27)

The construction industry ranks in the back rows in terms of digitalization. The numerous existing bridge structures require considerable effort for inspection and reliable assessment of their condition ... [more ▼]

The construction industry ranks in the back rows in terms of digitalization. The numerous existing bridge structures require considerable effort for inspection and reliable assessment of their condition. However, the state-of-the-art for inspecting these structures still relies on the visual inspection realized by bridge inspectors. The current paper summarizes several research projects in the field of condition assessment of bridge structures at the University of Luxembourg by analysing the structural response due to dynamic excitation and static loading tests. The latest development aims at using the most modern measurement techniques by combining them to a new method, the Deformation Area Difference (DAD)-Method in order to simplify and automatize at most the inspection process. The proposed DAD-Method is based on conventional static load deflection tests. It allows the localization of stiffness-reducing damage by using a very precise measurement of the deflection line and by combining this outcome to the deflection line generated by a simplified finite element model of the bridge. In order to investigate the condition of a bridge by the DAD-Method modern measurement techniques such as photogrammetry and laser scanning are used. In the framework of the conducted research, these techniques are also compared to traditional measurement systems such as total station and inductive displacement sensors as well as to digital levelling sensors. By theoretical examples and experimental tests, it can be shown that the DAD-Method is able to detect and localize damage when the damage level is dominant on the measurement noise. This paper investigates also the application of the method on a real bridge structure in Luxembourg. All of the above-mentioned measurement techniques were used, whereby the photogrammetry is applied using both, stable tripods and an autonomous flying drone. This allows examining the accuracy of the different measurement systems when applied on a real-size structure. [less ▲]

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See detailTowards an understanding of biculturalism: The dynamic tension of being bicultural
Murdock, Elke UL

Scientific Conference (2019, August 22)

One facet of contemporary societies is their increasingly diverse composition – a consequence of accelerated movement of people across the globe. There is a growing number of individuals who are living ... [more ▼]

One facet of contemporary societies is their increasingly diverse composition – a consequence of accelerated movement of people across the globe. There is a growing number of individuals who are living with more than one cultural influence. This requires new theoretical understanding of biculturalism. How do individuals with significant and prolonged second culture exposure negotiate their cultural identities? Past research has relied on additive models, which conceptualize biculturalism simply as the sum of their cultural experiences, emphasizing the relative influence of each culture. The transformative theory of biculturalism goes beyond this model by focusing on the process of negotiation (hybridization, integrating and frame switching) recognizing that this process itself is already transforming the cultural experience. I will present a theory of biculturalism as a self-stabilizing tensegrity network. Previous models fall short in understanding the process of bicultural identity construal. Building on Dialogical Self theory and the idea of tensional integrity or tensegrity (Marsico & Tateo, 2017) I will show how applying such a framework captures the everyday reality of those living in a boundary-crossing world. Human beings are involved in constant positioning and counter-positioning the forms of which go beyond simple dual systems views – a co-genetic logic being more appropriate allowing for a third way. Tension may lead to a dialectical synthesis—a concept that will be elaborated in concrete ways. Tension is viewed as a positive force, stabilizing the self and at the same time dynamic allowing for the emergence of a qualitatively new whole. [less ▲]

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See detailForging and Paving a Future: Immigrant Status and Academic Achievement in Luxembourg
Rivas, Salvador UL; Reichel, Yanica UL; Krämer, Charlotte UL et al

Scientific Conference (2019, August 21)

In the United States, much has been written about the upward or downward social mobility of the so-called, “New Second Generation”. In Europe, this topic has only recently begun to take shape; mostly in ... [more ▼]

In the United States, much has been written about the upward or downward social mobility of the so-called, “New Second Generation”. In Europe, this topic has only recently begun to take shape; mostly in regard to the Netherlands, Germany, France and the UK. In the context of Luxembourg, however, there is very little literature on this topic even though nearly 50% of its population is now of immigrant status. Though small in geography and population, Luxembourg is a founding member of the E.U. and quite literally in the heart of continental Europe. It hosts a diverse set of immigrant groups, continuously attracting economic and some political immigrants, most notably from Italy, the former Yugoslavia and Portugal. Each of these groups arriving at a specific sociohistorical moment: Italians at the height of the steel industry, former Yugoslavians fleeing war, and Portuguese to meet construction and service industry needs. Consequently, Luxembourg is truly a multilingual and multicultural country that makes for a fascinating microcosm to test and explore existing theories of immigrant integration. Its context presents a unique opportunity to study and extrapolate from to anticipate the needs of immigrants elsewhere. Using 2016 data from Luxembourg’s school monitoring programme (ÉpStan), we investigate existing and emerging differences in academic achievement among 1st, 2nd, and later generation immigrant groups in Luxembourg. We analyse math and language proficiencies (German and French) among a cohort of secondary school students (9th grade, N=6286). Preliminary results indicate clear generational differences. These are interpreted in relation to immigrant group characteristics and acculturation in Luxembourg. Implications for the new second generation in the European context will be discussed. [less ▲]

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See detailDimensional Comparison Effects on Facets of Subject-Specific Anxieties: A Nested Modelling Approach
Talic, Irma UL; Sparfeldt, Jörn; Möller, Jens et al

Scientific Conference (2019, August 16)

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See detailAssimilation and Contrast Effects of Dimensional Comparisons in Self-Concepts, Interests & Anxieties
van der Westhuizen, Lindie UL; Arens, Katrin; Greiff, Samuel UL et al

Scientific Conference (2019, August 16)

Research on the internal/external frame of reference (I/E) model has frequently found contrast effects of dimensional comparisons (i.e. a negative relationship between achievement and self-concept across ... [more ▼]

Research on the internal/external frame of reference (I/E) model has frequently found contrast effects of dimensional comparisons (i.e. a negative relationship between achievement and self-concept across domains) between math and verbal domains. The generalised internal/external frame of reference (GI/E) model extends the I/E model to multiple domains including multiple languages and to other academic self-beliefs and attitudes. When considering multiple languages, achievement-self-concept relations across languages have been found to be either negative (i.e. contrast effect), positive (i.e. assimilation effect), or non-significant. The present study contributes to the ongoing debate concerning the effect of dimensional comparisons among languages by (1) examining dimensional comparisons across two languages and (2) extending the examination to interest and anxiety as outcome variables beyond self-concept. We analysed domain-specific self-concepts, interest, anxieties, and achievement regarding French, German and math in a representative sample (N=5,789) of Luxembourgish ninth-graders. Findings indicated (1) clear contrast effects in the formation of self-concept and interest in German, French and math, and (2) a combination of contrast, assimilation and/or no effects in the formation of anxiety in math, German, and French. With regard to the latter, contrast effects were found for achievement-anxiety paths from German to French, French to German, and French to math. Achievement-anxiety paths from math to French and German to math were non-significant, while the path from math achievement to German anxiety showed a small, yet significant assimilation effect. Results are contextualised within the multilingual Luxembourgish educational system and implications for research on dimensional comparisons are discussed. [less ▲]

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See detailImplementing intelligence facets as predictors into the generalised I/E model
Hausen, Jennifer UL; Möller, Jens; Greiff, Samuel UL et al

Scientific Conference (2019, August 13)

The internal/external (I/E) frame of reference model postulates that achievement influences the formation of academic self-concept (ASC) via social and dimensional comparison processes. Its recent ... [more ▼]

The internal/external (I/E) frame of reference model postulates that achievement influences the formation of academic self-concept (ASC) via social and dimensional comparison processes. Its recent extension as the generalized I/E model allows further domains than math and verbal achievement. However, intelligence facets as an indicator of achievement have been neglected within the GI/E model framework. Therefore, the purpose of this research is to explore the influences of three intelligence facets (verbal, numerical, figural) on domain-specific ASCs beyond grades and achievement scores. We drew on N=382 German students to analyze verbal, numerical, and figural intelligence, German and math achievement, self-reported grades and ASCs in four domains. We performed a structural equation model using Mplus with grades, achievement scores and intelligence facets specified as predictors and domain-specific ASCs as criteria. Positive paths were found from math, physics, German and English grade to their corresponding self-concepts. A positive path was found between physics grade and math ASC while negative paths were found from English grade to math and physics ASC and from math grade to German, physics and English ASC. The path coefficients from math achievement to math ASC as well as to physics ASC were positive; German achievement was negatively related to math ASC. Lastly, numerical intelligence was positively related to physics ASC, and verbal intelligence was positively related to English ASC. Thus, intelligence, specifically numerical and verbal intelligence, seem to be valid predictors of domain-specific ACSs beyond grades and achievement test scores. [less ▲]

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See detailThe Long 19th Century of Music in Luxembourg. Music History, Sociology and Ethnology
Sagrillo, Damien UL

Scientific Conference (2019, August 09)

Music historiography is multifaceted. The historiography of music in Luxembourg is divided into various aspects. Firstly, it is part of regional music research in Europe and, as far as Luxembourg is ... [more ▼]

Music historiography is multifaceted. The historiography of music in Luxembourg is divided into various aspects. Firstly, it is part of regional music research in Europe and, as far as Luxembourg is concerned, national music research. A first point of view is music ethnology: citizens, nations have their songs and pass them on orally across national and linguistic borders and over generations. Folksongs originate from the music of the people, and patriotic music in Luxembourg is often music based on folksong styles. A further aspect of music in Luxembourg is that art music originated since the independence of the Grand Duchy in the 19th century. Sociological considerations deal with community music in Luxembourg. The starting point is a more liberal constitution, which for the first time offered citizens the right of assembly. Finally, my lecture will offer some insights of musical activities of people who left their homeland. [less ▲]

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See detailValue-added modeling in primary school: What covariates to include?
Levy, Jessica UL; Brunner, Martin; Keller, Ulrich UL et al

Scientific Conference (2019, August)

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See detailFirst Reflections on Identity Constructions of International Mobiles based on Data of from the German Emigration and Remigration Panel Study (GERPS)
Decieux, Jean Philippe Pierre UL

Scientific Conference (2019, August)

International mobile persons usually live in multicultural contexts and have frequent opportunities for cultural contact. They live for example in mixed-national households or interact with different ... [more ▼]

International mobile persons usually live in multicultural contexts and have frequent opportunities for cultural contact. They live for example in mixed-national households or interact with different cultures in their everyday live. An interesting question is how they organize and experience their nationalities, identities and feelings of belongings and how these develop over time. Based on data from the first two waves of the new and unique German Emigration and Remigration Panel Study (GERPS) the paper tries to answer the following questions: How are the identities and belongings experienced? Do they self-identify in a mono- or bi or transcultural way, and what factors (sociodemographic, personality) contribute to either identification? GERPS will provide information on approximately 11.000 international mobile individuals which have recently emigrated from Germany to any other country in the world or recently re-migrated to Germany. As GERPS is a panel study, I will be able to present first results concerning developments and changes over time, which is important as modern theories reflect identity and cultural construction as dynamic negotiation processes. [less ▲]

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See detailM-QAM Modulation Symbol-Level Precoding for Power Minimization: Closed-Form Solution
Krivochiza, Jevgenij UL; Merlano Duncan, Juan Carlos UL; Chatzinotas, Symeon UL et al

Scientific Conference (2019, August)

In this paper, we derive a closed-form algorithm of the computationally efficient Symbol-Level Precoding (SLP) for power efficient communications when using M-QAM modulated waveforms. The channel state ... [more ▼]

In this paper, we derive a closed-form algorithm of the computationally efficient Symbol-Level Precoding (SLP) for power efficient communications when using M-QAM modulated waveforms. The channel state information (CSI) based and data-aided SLP technique optimizes power efficiency by solving a non-negative convex quadratic optimization problem per time frame of transmitted symbols. The optimization combines constructive inter-user interference to minimize the sum power of precoded symbols at the transmitter side under constraints for minimum SNR at the receiver side. The SLP implementation incurs extra computational complexity of the transmitter. We propose a convex quadratic optimization problem for M-QAM constellations and derive a closed-form algorithm with a fixed number of iterations to solve the problem. [less ▲]

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See detailPresent-Day Land and Sea Level Changes around South Georgia Island: Results from Precise Levelling, GNSS, Tide Gauge and Satellite Altimetry Measurements
Teferle, Felix Norman UL; Dalziel, I W D; Hunegnaw, Addisu UL et al

Scientific Conference (2019, July 25)

South Georgia Island, the main land outcrop on the South Georgia microcontinent (SGM), is located approximately 1,400 km east of the Falkland Islands and approximately 1,400 km northeast of the ... [more ▼]

South Georgia Island, the main land outcrop on the South Georgia microcontinent (SGM), is located approximately 1,400 km east of the Falkland Islands and approximately 1,400 km northeast of the northernmost tip of the Antarctic peninsular. The SGM is believed to lie south of the North Scotia Ridge (NSR), which forms the boundary to the South America Plate, while to the south it is bordered by the Scotia Plate (SP). In its sub-Antarctic location, the island is largely covered by mountain glaciers which have been reported to be retreating due to climatic change. Furthermore, during past glaciation periods the island and its shelf area, stretching much of the SGM, have been ice covered as was revealed by scarring of the sub-oceanic topography. Together with ongoing tectonics along the NSR and recent seismicity at the SP boundary, these processes have the ability to produce significant uplift on local to regional scales. With its mid-ocean location in the Southern Atlantic Ocean South Georgia Island is in a key position for the oceanic and geodetic global monitoring networks. As these net-works suffer from a Hemisphere imbalance with the number of stations in the Northern Hemisphere outnumbering those in the Southern Hemisphere, operating these stations to the highest standards is of key scientific value. It is of particular interest to monitor the tide gauge (GLOSS ID 187) at King Edward Point (KEP) for vertical land movements to establish a continuous record of its datum within the Permanent Service for Mean Sea Level (PSMSL), which in turn makes it useful for long-term sea level studies and satellite altimetry calibrations. With the establishment of five GNSS stations on the islands by teams from Luxembourg, the UK and the USA during 2013 to 2015, and the scientific analysis of these data within a global network of stations, it has now become possible to study present-day vertical land movements and their impacts. Furthermore, together with four precise levelling campaigns of the KEP benchmark network in 2013, 2014 and two in 2017, it has also been possible to investigate the very local character of the vertical motions near KEP, i.e. the stability of the jetty upon which the tide gauge is mounted. In this study, we will present the still preliminary results from the GNSS and levelling measurements and will discuss their impact on the sea level record from the KEP tide gauge. Our measurements show that while South Georgia Island and the area around KEP are rising, the jetty and tide gauge are subsiding, leading to a lower magnitude of the observed sea level change than expected from satellite altimetry. In order to improve the agreement between these measurements both local and regional vertical land movements need to be monitored. [less ▲]

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See detailBracketing in student writing: its uses (and abuses)
Deroey, Katrien UL

Scientific Conference (2019, July 23)

This paper reports on the use of bracketed text in a large corpus of student writing. The function of bracketing has been neglected in academic writing research and coursebooks. Yet it is closely related ... [more ▼]

This paper reports on the use of bracketed text in a large corpus of student writing. The function of bracketing has been neglected in academic writing research and coursebooks. Yet it is closely related to important text construction issues such as information packaging, coherence, clarity, conciseness, intertextual framing and sourcing. With a view to informing academic writing description and instruction, we examined the relationship between bracketed text and its cotext in a wide variety of disciplines and assignment genres. The relationships are described using an adaptation of Halliday and Matthiessen’s (2014) logico-semantic framework of clausal relationships. To better understand and teach the use of this information packaging feature, we studied the relationship between bracketed text and its cotext in the British Academic Written English (BAWE) corpus of high-graded student assignments. Using Sketch Engine and corpus query language, we extracted a random sample of 2000 instances of bracketing in running text only. This subcorpus is composed of 500 instances from each of the four main disciplinary groupings (Arts and Humanities, Life Sciences, Physical Sciences, Social Sciences) and contains instances from most of the BAWE assignment genres. The concordances were imported into a database table in FileMaker Pro. This database programme facilitates coding by limiting choices depending on previous selections and thus guiding the coder through the analytical steps. For the analysis of the data, it offers flexibility for grouping records and aggregating results on different levels. The logico-semantic framework used in systemic functional linguistics to classify the relationships between clauses (Halliday & Matthiessen, 2014) served as our starting point to classify the relationships between bracketed text and cotext. This framework distinguishes two fundamental logico-semantic relationships: expansion, which ‘relates phenomena as being of the same order of experience’, and projection, which ‘relates phenomena of one order of experience (the processes of saying and thinking) to phenomena of a higher order (semiotic phenomena – what people say and think)’ (p. 443). The latter contains three subtypes: elaboration (‘one clause elaborates on the meaning of another by further specifying or describing it’) (p. 461), enhancement (‘one clause (or subcomplex) enhances the meaning of another by qualifying it) (p. 476) and extension (‘one clause extends the meaning of another by adding something new to it’) (p. 471). This framework was refined and expanded through several stages of interrating and discussion in order to reflect our findings. We first analysed a random sample of 1000 instances from the whole BAWE corpus. With the resulting adapted classificatory framework we next independently analysed a quarter of our subcorpus of 2000 concordances. This led to further refinement of the framework and classificatory criteria. Finally, we each analyzed a different set of concordances from the disciplinary groupings. Disciplinary informants were consulted where needed. Our analysis revealed four major logico-semantic relationships between the bracketed text and cotext: in addition to Halliday & Matthiessen’s (2014) projection (1) and expansion (elaboration (2), enhancement (3, 4), extension (5)), we identified bracketed text functioning as intratextual reference (6) and code (7). The few instances that could not be confidently classified were assigned to a ‘hard to classify’ category. (1) However the anticipated number of children per woman in Europe and the USA is still near or above two (Bongaarts, 1999), showing that many are still having children. (2) Many of these injures are healed fractures and breaks occurring around the torso (upper body). (3) It is dated to the reign of Nectanebo II (360-343 BC). (4) Acetanilide (4.78g, 35.4 mmol) was dissolved in cold, glacial acetic acid (25ml, 437.1 mmol) (5) Parmenides decision to include a cosmology that he has already (apparently) proved to be flawed is an interesting one to say the least. (6) This is called circular polarization (figure 5) and is the natural state of white light. (7) Stronger field ligands such as (PPh 3) and (NCS) increase the splitting. Projection was –perhaps not surprisingly- the most common relationship by far, although markedly less frequent in the Physical Sciences. Expansion was mainly achieved through elaboration, with restatements (2) and abbreviations predominating. Enhancement relationships were mostly temporal locations (3) or measurements (4). Extension was relatively rare (5). Intratextual references (6) took various forms, such as figures, appendices, equations, and line numbers for quoted text. Bracketed code was a marked feature of the Physical Sciences, occurring in formulae and enclosing symbols or abbreviations (7). Overall, students’ use of bracketed text appeared to reflect disciplinary conventions and reflected the genre goals of assignments by demonstrating knowledge, understanding and appropriate source use. Contrary to expectations, instances where the bracketed text seemed superfluous or adversely affected coherence were rare. We conclude by discussing what these findings mean for academic writing instruction. Reference Halliday, M. A. K., & Matthiessen, C. M. I. M. (2014). Halliday's introduction to functional grammar (4 ed.). Abingdon: Routledge. [less ▲]

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See detailTies that bind: Unearthing shared treasures between Luxemoburg and Brazil
Santana, Dominique UL; Luciano, Alessandra

Scientific Conference (2019, July 18)

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See detailWind music and scholarship. IGEB and WASBE
Sagrillo, Damien UL

Scientific Conference (2019, July 13)

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See detailRecent Activities on Tristan da Cunha Island: Geodetic Installations, Local Tie Measurements and their Analysis
Teferle, Felix Norman UL; Hunegnaw, Addisu UL; Backes, Dietmar UL et al

Scientific Conference (2019, July 11)

During 2017 a team from the University of Luxembourg and the National Oceanography Centre, Liverpool, established a permanent Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) station and two new tide gauges on ... [more ▼]

During 2017 a team from the University of Luxembourg and the National Oceanography Centre, Liverpool, established a permanent Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) station and two new tide gauges on Tristan da Cunha Island in the South Atlantic Ocean. These installations were funded through various projects at both collaborating institutions under the umbrella of the International GNSS Service (IGS) Tide Gauge Benchmark Monitoring (TIGA) Working Group and the Global Geodetic Observing System (GGOS) focus area on Sea Level Change, Variability and Forecasting. While this was the first scientific installation of a GNSS station on the main island within the Tristan da Cunha archipelago, IGS station GOUG, located on Gough Island which lies 412 km to the south, has been in operation since 1998. Unfortunately GOUG was decommissioned in 2018. Sea level observations on Tristan da Cunha have a longer history than GNSS with various tide gauges having been in operation since 1984. Tristan da Cunha also hosts a Doppler Orbitography and Radiopositioning Integrated by Satellite (DORIS) station which was established in 2012 after a previous installation was upgraded and moved to the current site. The antenna TCTA is located on the concrete monument of the previous DORIS antenna. Furthermore, in order for future International Terrestrial Reference Frame (ITRF) computations to fully benefit from the proximity of the sensors, the geodetic ties between the respective antennas (and reference markers in case of the tide gauges) need to be determined at the millimeter level using various terrestrial surveying methods and a local benchmark network. This contribution provides details of the activities on Tristan da Cunha including the installations, the established benchmark network, the terrestrial surveys of the geodetic ties and the analysis of these measurements in order to geometrically link the GNSS and DORIS antennas to each other as well as to the tide gauges. [less ▲]

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See detailWHY IS THE MARKET SKEWNESS-RETURN RELATIONSHIP NEGATIVE?
Lehnert, Thorsten UL

Scientific Conference (2019, July 09)

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See detailNamenskunde – Gender(re)konstruktionen in Autobiographien von Transpersonen
Artuso, Sandy Kathy UL

Scientific Conference (2019, July 05)

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See detailInformation Content of Systematic and Idiosyncratic Risk Disclosure
Weber, Véronique UL; Muessig, Anke UL

Scientific Conference (2019, July 04)

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See detailElder Care in the Context of Migration
Albert, Isabelle UL; Kretschmer, Mirjam; Malerba, Angela et al

Scientific Conference (2019, July 03)

Background: Demographic changes related to ageing and migration are key societal issues of our days. Cultural diversity in elder care will increase considerably in the next years especially in Northern ... [more ▼]

Background: Demographic changes related to ageing and migration are key societal issues of our days. Cultural diversity in elder care will increase considerably in the next years especially in Northern and Western European countries due to a large share of first generation immigrants from the 1950s to 1970s. Culture-specific needs, expectations and behavioral tendencies become particularly salient in times of frailty. Cultures differ in how they arrange old age care and intergenerational co-residence patterns. When families migrate from a more collectivist, family-oriented to a more individualist cultural context, the question arises in how far traditional care patterns from the country of origin are retained or adapted to the host cultural context. Ageing migrants have been found to be more reluctant regarding formal care due to cultural, religious or language issues which might put specific pressure on their close family members who are often responsible for care arrangements, even if not providing hands-on care. Objectives: The aim of the present study was to examine how established formal assistance should be modified in order to fit the special needs of both informal caregivers and care receivers with migration background. For this purpose, we will draw on two sub-studies: a) a qualitative study with n = 3 in-depth expert-interviews in the field of elder care and migration, and b) a survey in a daycare center with a large population of elder care receivers with migrant background. Results/Discussion: Preliminary results show different starting points for a culture-sensitive adaptation of the services. First, as the existence of help services is often unknown to migrants, it is important to provide low-threshold information, involving multipliers. Second, an important aspect is the culture-sensitive training of staff, increasing their awareness of cultural aspects in care and introducing an individualized as well as relationship-oriented approach. Finally, the exchange of caregivers with other concerned turned out to be a helpful resource and therefore it shall be facilitated and supported by formal services. A structural integration of cultural sensitive care services in the existing elder care system is highly suggested in order to meet the future challenges. [less ▲]

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See detailStatement of the Board on Cultural and Ethnic Diversity towards intercultural and individual Diversity
De Ponte, Ulrike; Albert, Isabelle UL; Žegura, Iva

Scientific Conference (2019, July 03)

Cultural and individual diversity is getting more and more part of the daily work of each psychologist nowadays, but still this issue is less or insufficiently addressed in the study programmes all over ... [more ▼]

Cultural and individual diversity is getting more and more part of the daily work of each psychologist nowadays, but still this issue is less or insufficiently addressed in the study programmes all over Europe. Therefore, psychologists work repeating in situations of the quality of a cultural overlap being not or insufficient prepared for this yet. The psychologists’ core work of understanding and supporting people from a psychological point of view lacks knowledge as well as the performance of taking in account multiple and differentiated perspectives. The conclusion is: The subject Intercultural psychology needs to be mandatorily included into the curricula of study programmes of Psychology and this already on Bachelor levels. This joint-symposium is supposed to aim in working groups after the input-presentations in order to collect all kind of psychologists’ views on the needs that are seen out of the view of the divers working fields of psychologists. [less ▲]

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See detailTranslanguaging as a pedagogy, a practice or a strategy? Examples from a preschool and a primary school class in Luxembourg
Kirsch, Claudine UL; Degano, Sarah UL; Mortini, Simone UL

Scientific Conference (2019, July 01)

The concept of translanguaging has been continuously redefined in education, psycholinguistics and sociolinguistics, which has led to some loss of meaning. Regarding teacher translanguaging, studies show ... [more ▼]

The concept of translanguaging has been continuously redefined in education, psycholinguistics and sociolinguistics, which has led to some loss of meaning. Regarding teacher translanguaging, studies show that it has been used as a strategy to further comprehension and learning, and as a pedagogy. The latter recognizes the existence of multiple languages in class and leverages the students’ semiotic system to make meaning and learn (García et al. 2017). Translanguaging has thereby been understood either as a resource-oriented pedagogy that challenges traditional conceptualizations of bilingualism and language learning, or as a pedagogy that fights social inequalities. Most research studies adopt the first view (Poza, 2017). The present paper combines two longitudinal doctoral studies and investigates the ways in which a preschool and a primary school teacher use translanguaging in their classes in Luxembourg. Drawing on interviews and observations, the findings show that the preschool teacher implemented a translanguaging pedagogy. She planned for the use of several languages, opened translanguaging spaces, and systematically translanguaged where she believed it would support learning (Kirsch et al. submitted). By contrast, the primary school teacher used translanguaging as a pedagogical strategy. She used the curricular languages and only translanguaged to support particular students. These differences are explained by the curriculum and the preschool teacher’s attendance of a professional development course. The findings contribute to our understanding of possible ways of implementing translanguaging as a pedagogy. [less ▲]

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See detailTranslanguaging Course for Teachers
Aleksic, Gabrijela UL; Bebic-Crestany, Dzoen

Scientific Conference (2019, July 01)

Amongst the many terms to describe the natural linguistic experiences of bilinguals, translanguaging is standing out as the socio-linguistic theory that consciously recognises a unitary linguistic ... [more ▼]

Amongst the many terms to describe the natural linguistic experiences of bilinguals, translanguaging is standing out as the socio-linguistic theory that consciously recognises a unitary linguistic repertoire of bilinguals. Translanguaging is used without regards to boundaries imposed by socio-politically constructed named languages and the unnatural differentiation of various forms of communication. The extensive research of many scholars, most notably by Li Wei and Ofelia García, confronts the social and educational suppression of minorities’ languages and cultures in schools. Their analyses and proposed solutions for social justice, therefore, serve as the theoretical and pedagogical basis of our research in Luxembourg’s multilingual education. The understanding that bilinguals translanguage naturally in conversation and for sense- and meaning-making purposes has also been shown in Luxembourg: 64% of four-year olds in Luxembourg do not speak Luxembourgish and translanguaging happens naturally. Research also shows that students of minority groups generally underperform at school. The implementation of translanguaging in Luxembourg’s multilingual education would therefore enable a better development of school and home language, metalinguistic awareness, linguistic tolerance, socio-emotional development and multilingual identity. To address the challenges of multilingual education in Luxembourg, we firstly offer a professional development (PD) course that aims to help teachers take a translanguaging stance, vital for its success. Secondly, we adapt the general translanguaging pedagogical methodology to incorporate home languages in teachers’ daily classroom activities. Our project has been supported by the Luxembourg National Research Fund* to deliver 8 sessions from the Translanguaging guide developed at the City University of New York. Given the local multilingual context, introducing translanguaging and adapting the guide is a challenge for us as researchers. We will use quantitative and qualitative methods to assess the success of the PD and better understand translanguaging as a theory, practice and pedagogy. [less ▲]

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See detailYes, we can! Mining Arguments in 50 Years of US Presidential Campaign Debates
Haddadan, Shohreh UL; Villata, Serena; Cabrio, Elena

Scientific Conference (2019, July)

Political debates offer a rare opportunity for citizens to compare the candidates’ positions on the most controversial topics of the campaign. Thus they represent a natural application scenario for ... [more ▼]

Political debates offer a rare opportunity for citizens to compare the candidates’ positions on the most controversial topics of the campaign. Thus they represent a natural application scenario for Argument Mining. As existing research lacks solid empirical investigation of the typology of argument components in political debates, we fill this gap by proposing an Argument Mining approach to political debates. We address this task in an empirical manner by annotating 39 political debates from the last 50 years of US presidential campaigns, creating a new corpus of 29k argument components, labeled as premises and claims. We then propose two tasks: (1) identifying the argumentative components in such debates, and (2) classifying them as premises and claims. We show that feature-rich SVM learners and Neural Network architectures outperform standard baselines in Argument Mining over such complex data. We release the new corpus USElecDeb60To16 and the accompanying software under free licenses to the research community. [less ▲]

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See detailA DEM approach for modeling biomass fast pyrolysis in a double auger reactor
Qi, Fenglei UL

Scientific Conference (2019, July)

Thermochemical conversion of biomass via fast pyrolysis process is a promising way to produce renewable fuels and chemicals. In this paper, an extended discrete element method (DEM) is developed to ... [more ▼]

Thermochemical conversion of biomass via fast pyrolysis process is a promising way to produce renewable fuels and chemicals. In this paper, an extended discrete element method (DEM) is developed to predict the biomass fast pyrolysis process in a double auger reactor, which is described as a reacting granular flow. The thermodynamic state of each particle is properly predicted with an addition of a heat transfer model and a reaction model on top of the traditional DEM method. The results suggest that the predictions of the thermochemical decomposition kinetics of biomass components are consistent with the experimental observations. The results also indicate that the fast pyrolysis in the reactor is controlled by the heat transfer process. Any operating condition variation in favor of enhancing heat transfer is beneficial to the fast pyrolysis process and vice versa. [less ▲]

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See detailEquations to predict the shear connection capacity of composite beams with slender profiled steel sheeting
Odenbreit, Christoph UL; Vigneri, Valentino UL; Lam, Dennis

Scientific Conference (2019, July)

The rules of EN1994-1-1 for shear connections in composite beams with deep profiled sheeting sometimes lead to an overestimation of the load bearing capacity of the respective shear connection. The ... [more ▼]

The rules of EN1994-1-1 for shear connections in composite beams with deep profiled sheeting sometimes lead to an overestimation of the load bearing capacity of the respective shear connection. The estimation of the impact of the sheeting shape on the calculated connection resistance is based on test results from the late seventies until the early nineties. Meanwhile, new products have appeared on the market with the target to reduce the volume and weight of the concrete in order to maximize the slab efficiency. However, the corresponding effects onto the shear connection have been underestimated because the use of deeper and more narrow deck rib lead to a more slender profile with a changed failure behaviour. Instead of the shearing-off failure of the stud, a combination of concrete cone failure and plastic bending of the stud – with one or two plastic hinges - was identified in laboratory tests. Based on the observed failure mechanisms, a new mechanical model with respective analytical equations for the shear resistance of headed studs in profiled steel sheeting was proposed. The new model extends the yield hinge mechanism, which was developed by Lungershausen [1], to more precisely predict the formation of the number of yield hinges depending on the mechanical and geometrical properties with the support of a finite element model. The complete equations consider the geometry of the stud and the steel decking as well as the material strengths of the stud and concrete. The statistical evaluation shows a good accordance with the developed model and analytical design equations. This contribution presents the new design equations and their background describing the mechanical model, the numerical study and statistical evaluation of push-out test results. [less ▲]

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See detailOn the single-peakedness property
Devillet, Jimmy UL

Scientific Conference (2019, June 28)

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See detailExpansion nach Belgien als Verwaltungstätigkeit: der Kölner Beamte Franz Thedieck im NS
Brüll, Christoph UL

Scientific Conference (2019, June 28)

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See detailForced migrants in Luxembourg: an LE approach to linguistic integration
Kalocsanyiova, Erika UL

Scientific Conference (2019, June 28)

This paper outlines the core contributions that a linguistic ethnography (LE) approach can make to forced migration and integration research. LE provides multiple tools for capturing the complexity and ... [more ▼]

This paper outlines the core contributions that a linguistic ethnography (LE) approach can make to forced migration and integration research. LE provides multiple tools for capturing the complexity and transient character of the real social environments in which forced migrants integrate. After summarising the main arguments of the literature which examines the language–displacement nexus, this contribution moves on to discuss the nature and focus of the proposed approach. It then turns to specific examples from a two-year LE research project that addressed the impact of multilingualism on forced migrants’ trajectories in Luxembourg. [less ▲]

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See detailN point Virasoro algebras are multi-point Krichever Novikov type algebras
Schlichenmaier, Martin UL

Scientific Conference (2019, June 28)

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See detail“I’m much better off…” - Comparative Processes and Future Intentions of Elder Portuguese Immigrants in Luxembourg
Albert, Isabelle UL

Scientific Conference (2019, June 28)

Ageing and migration have become key issues in many European countries as a large number of first generation immigrants are approaching retirement age in the next years. Focusing on elder Portuguese ... [more ▼]

Ageing and migration have become key issues in many European countries as a large number of first generation immigrants are approaching retirement age in the next years. Focusing on elder Portuguese immigrants in the Grand Duchy of Luxembourg, the present study had the aim to explore the roles of social and temporal comparisons for future intentions to stay in the receiving country, return to the country of origin or commute between both. Whereas earlier studies have examined the roles of social or cultural links, economic or health aspects, we focused here on the participants’ personal evaluation of their migratory project by asking them to evaluate their current situation compared with the past and with peers. A sample of N = 109 Portuguese first generation immigrants (49.5% female; average age: M = 55.35, SD = 7.42) who had been living in Luxembourg for about M = 30.69 (SD = 8.55) years were interviewed by use of a standardized questionnaire. Analyses showed that about half of participants preferred to stay in Luxembourg, whereas the remainder planned to return to Portugal or to commute. The appraisal of the current (vs. past) situation was significantly more positive for those who planned to stay or commute compared to those who wanted to return after retirement. Interestingly, both those who planned to return and those who wanted to stay engaged more frequently in social or temporal comparisons than those who preferred to commute. Results will be discussed taking into consideration regulatory processes of subjective well-being and different migration experiences. [less ▲]

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See detailOpening Remarks / Chair / Program Chair
Schafer, Valerie UL

Scientific Conference (2019, June 27)

Decoding Europe. Technological Pasts in the Digital Age. The conference will study – in an interdisciplinary way – the impact of digitisation on historical developments and the consequences of the digital ... [more ▼]

Decoding Europe. Technological Pasts in the Digital Age. The conference will study – in an interdisciplinary way – the impact of digitisation on historical developments and the consequences of the digital turn on the writing and shaping of European history. The Tensions of Europe (ToE) conference is organised biennially. ToE is an interdisciplinary community of scholars who study the shaping of Europe by paying attention to the role of technology and material culture. It welcomes fruitful interaction between historians of technology and scholars who study technology from all other fields of the humanities and the social sciences. [less ▲]

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See detailLaser polishing of Aluminum and Polyamide for dissimilar laser welded assemblies
Amne Elahi, Mahdi UL; Koch, Marcus; Plapper, Peter UL

Scientific Conference (2019, June 27)

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See detailRécits visuels de la Grande Guerre au Luxembourg : cent ans de manuels d'histoire
Camarda, Sandra UL; Scuto, Denis UL

Scientific Conference (2019, June 26)

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See detailLaser overlap joining from copper to aluminum and analysis of failure zone
Mathivanan, Karthik UL; Plapper, Peter UL

Scientific Conference (2019, June 26)

Joining of copper and aluminum sheets are very crucial for battery application. When joining from copper sheet, keyhole mode of welding is essential to overcome the reflectivity and melting threshold of ... [more ▼]

Joining of copper and aluminum sheets are very crucial for battery application. When joining from copper sheet, keyhole mode of welding is essential to overcome the reflectivity and melting threshold of copper. However, in dissimilar material interaction the resulting intermetallic (IMC) phases are brittle, which result in reduced performance.This paper analyses the joint with laser beam irradiated from the copper side (Cu on top). The idea is to distribute the intermetallic compounds inside the joint to obtain a ductile behavior. The zones of failure and the distribution of the intermetallic phase is studied. The microstructural analysis of the fusion zone and mechanical strength of the joint are presented. [less ▲]

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See detailHistory of networks: evolution, issues, challenges
Schafer, Valerie UL

Scientific Conference (2019, June 26)

This conference described and analyzed the recent evolutions in the field of the history of Internet and of the Web, underlining new trends and challenges.

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See detailBenefits, challenges, social learning and controversies around Local Food Systems
Reckinger, Rachel UL; Nemes, Gusztav; Lajos, Veronika

Scientific Conference (2019, June 25)

Objectives: Our WG touches upon three main elements among the themes of the conference: (1) innovation, (2) social justice and (3) knowledge production. Innovative local food systems and alternative food ... [more ▼]

Objectives: Our WG touches upon three main elements among the themes of the conference: (1) innovation, (2) social justice and (3) knowledge production. Innovative local food systems and alternative food networks, approached from a collaborative and participatory angle, bring about a cultural shift by associating prosumers through a renewed form of trust, reciprocity and community, thus reinforcing social and ecological justice. At the same time, such heterodox actors in the transition to more sustainable food systems create new forms of knowledge, that are contested, co-constructed and potentially conflictual – along with enabling or disabling policymaking and, often, in dialogue with research. Our main objective is in this topic to start the process of creating an edited special issue of a peer reviewed journal (Sociologia Ruralis, Studies of Agricultural Economics or similar) should raise from this WG. We invite researchers working in the area of (local) food systems, alternative food networks, short food supply chains and related topics (rural tourism, community supported agriculture, etc.). We consider both the benefits and possible conflicts/problems in the connected socio-economic, cultural and environmental processes and welcome theoretical papers and case studies, too. Topic: By welcoming case studies from all geographical areas, in a comparative manner, this Working Group’s aim is to address different understandings and dynamics happening within and around different types of Local Food Systems (LFS). Alternative food networks, local food systems and short food supply chains have long been viewed as a sustainable, green way of raising the value added and creating opportunities for sur/re-vival of rural economy and society. They induce many benefits in terms of environmental impact, cultural exemplification, ethical entrepreneurship, social justice or rural development. Conceptually, LFS can be understood as ‘local food for local people’, as for example in the Slow Food or the community supported agriculture (CSA) movements. They are then associated with low food miles, environmental protection (Jones 2002), enhanced social networks and revitalised local communities (Fenstra 1997). From a local economic development perspective, in particular when LFS produce high quality products, they can equally be considered as ‘local food for non-local people’, either transported to urban centres, or attracting flows of tourists into rural areas. Here LFS can still enhance local businesses, economic and rural development, yet social and environmental benefits (Guthman 2004) of such foodstuffs, marketed with the added value of environmental and social responsibility, are more difficult to trace. Therefore, besides benefits, we would also like to analyse potential dissonances, that the distinction between local or extra-local target groups help to identify – for instance: • established, certified organic producers might criticize non-certified yet organically producing CSAs as fragmenting an already minority market or showing a lack of solidarity by not contributing to organic labels; • when LFS end up producing high quality, expensive products, a dynamic of social exclusion might occur, favoring the wealthy; • enhanced local production, tourism, and visitor pressure can cause social, economic, and environmental degradation, multiplier effects do not always occur to build more businesses and sustain social and economic capital; • innovative alternative food networks tend to struggle with territorial competition over land and resources, but if they rely on external investments, they might additionally be confronted – more insidiously – with the risk of co-option by neoliberal corporate agendas. We welcome analyses focusing on negotiations and struggles among actors in a multifaceted foodscape, where some block and some enhance transitions. Viewing the relationships, interconnectedness and agency of niche innovations, local and non-local appropriations as well regime hegemonies opens up the theoretical perspective of contested knowledge claims. We look for questions and answers including: • How are dynamics of “knowing and growing food in a contested arena” (Goodman, DuPuis, Goodman, 2014) negotiated – sometimes in a mutually enhancing and locally beneficial way, sometimes in more conflictual ways? • What are the local and extra-local stakeholders’ (producers, intermediaries, customers, tourists) different and often conflicting interests and responsibilities in LFS? • What can we learn from the tensions and local problems of LFS in order to support relevant policies to solve current controversies within the sector? • How can rural sociologists use their knowledge and influence to support local rural stakeholders of LFS? [less ▲]

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See detailCharacterizations and enumerations of classes of quasitrivial n-ary semigroups
Devillet, Jimmy UL; Couceiro, Miguel

Scientific Conference (2019, June 23)

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See detailOverestimation of physical activity among young people: Does age and gender play a role?
Eckelt, Melanie UL; Hutmacher, Djenna UL; Steffgen, Georges UL et al

Scientific Conference (2019, June 22)

Background and purpose: Due to the continuous decrease of physical activity (PA) of people in industrialized countries (Kohl et al., 2012), PA behavior and its psychological foundations has become a key ... [more ▼]

Background and purpose: Due to the continuous decrease of physical activity (PA) of people in industrialized countries (Kohl et al., 2012), PA behavior and its psychological foundations has become a key issue in health-related research. Studies show that most people tend to overesti-mate their habitual PA (Skender et al., 2016), however, there is very little research on the role of demographic variables in this respect. Therefore, the aim of this study was to examine whether age and/or gender affect the (over)estimation of PA among children and adolescents. Methods: Data of 75 students (38 girls and 37 boys, 10 to 18 years) of various primary and sec-ondary schools were randomly included in the study. Habitual PA was assessed through an online self-report questionnaire (Schmidt et al., 2017) as well as by wearing an accelerometer (Acti-Graph GT3X-BT) over seven consecutive days. A multiple regression analysis was used to ana-lyze the impact of age and gender on the accuracy of PA estimation. Results: The students reported being active for at least 60 minutes on average on 4,0 ± 2,1 days per week, whereas the accelerometer data verify only 1,8 ± 1,6 days per week. Thus, a majority of 76% of the children and adolescents overestimated and 9% underestimated their PA. Almost 15% were correct in their PA estimation. However, results of the regression analysis indicate neither an effect of age ( = .003, p > .1) nor of gender ( = -.070, p > .1). Conclusions: Overestimation of PA is common not only among adults but also among children and adolescents. However, this misperception appears to be independent of age and gender, at least in the age group considered here. Future studies should examine further demographic and psychological variables in order to explain why most of the people significantly overestimate their habitual PA. [less ▲]

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See detail"Are you a boy or girl?" Who are the non-responders
Heinz, Andreas UL; Catunda, Carolina UL; van Duin, Claire UL et al

Scientific Conference (2019, June 20)

Background: In many studies, participants who do not state their gender are excluded from the analysis. This may be appropriate if they do not answer the questionnaire seriously. However, some ... [more ▼]

Background: In many studies, participants who do not state their gender are excluded from the analysis. This may be appropriate if they do not answer the questionnaire seriously. However, some participants may have understandable reasons for not reporting their gender, e.g. questioning their gender identity. Objective: How many students and which students do not answer the question on gender? Methods: HBSC 2018 raw data from Ireland, Luxembourg, Belgium and France are compared. To explore the reasons for non-response, we divided the participants into 3 groups: 1. Responders answered both sociodemographic questions (age and gender) 2. age non-responders did not answer the question on age. 3. Gender non-responders answered the question on age, but not the one on gender. Results: Between 0.8% (Ireland) and 1.2% (Luxembourg) of participants did not report their gender. About half of them did not answer the age question either. However, the other half belong to the group of gender non-responders and this group is disadvantaged compared to responders: they report lower life satisfaction, lower self-rated health, more health complaints, less peer support and their WHO-5 Well-being score is lower. Not answering the question on gender is rare. If the participants answered the question on age, but not the question on gender, then the variable gender is missing not at random. Implication: The question arises whether the group of gender non-responders should be included in the analysis and whether the question on gender should be asked differently in the future. [less ▲]

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See detailBridging the Gap between Requirements Modeling and Behavior-driven Development
Alferez, Mauricio UL; Pastore, Fabrizio UL; Sabetzadeh, Mehrdad UL et al

Scientific Conference (2019, June 20)

Acceptance criteria (AC) are implementation agnostic conditions that a system must meet to be consistent with its requirements and be accepted by its stakeholders. Each acceptance criterion is typically ... [more ▼]

Acceptance criteria (AC) are implementation agnostic conditions that a system must meet to be consistent with its requirements and be accepted by its stakeholders. Each acceptance criterion is typically expressed as a natural-language statement with a clear pass or fail outcome. Writing AC is a tedious and error-prone activity, especially when the requirements specifications evolve and there are different analysts and testing teams involved. Analysts and testers must iterate multiple times to ensure that AC are understandable and feasible, and accurately address the most important requirements and workflows of the system being developed. In many cases, analysts express requirements through models, along with natural language, typically in some variant of the UML. AC must then be derived by developers and testers from such models. In this paper, we bridge the gap between requirements models and AC by providing a UML-based modeling methodology and an automated solution to generate AC. We target AC in the form of Behavioral Specifications in the context of Behavioral-Driven Development (BDD), a widely used agile practice in many application domains. More specially we target the well-known Gherkin language to express AC, which then can be used to generate executable test cases. We evaluate our modeling methodology and AC generation solution through an industrial case study in the financial domain. Our results suggest that (1) our methodology is feasible to apply in practice, and (2) the additional modeling effort required by our methodology is outweighed by the benefits the methodology brings in terms of automated and systematic AC generation and improved model precision. [less ▲]

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See detail„What’s a normal weight?“ – Weight assessment standards in Origin- and Receiving Country and Immigrant Adolescents’ Weight-Status Self-Assessment
Kern, Matthias Robert UL; Heinz, Andreas UL; Stevens, Gonneke et al

Scientific Conference (2019, June 19)

Background: Many young people struggle with correctly assessing their weight-status, often leaving over- or underweight to go unnoticed thereby preventing adequate intervention. The prevalence of weight ... [more ▼]

Background: Many young people struggle with correctly assessing their weight-status, often leaving over- or underweight to go unnoticed thereby preventing adequate intervention. The prevalence of weight-status misperception differs considerably cross-nationally, indicating that individual weight-status assessment is informed by culturally transmitted standards of evaluation. For adolescents with a migration background, this brings up the problem of multiple frames of reference, as their perception of weight-status may be influenced by different cultural standards. Objective: We investigate the extent to which the assessment of one's own weight-status is based on standards of the heritage country or the receiving country. Methods: Data are retrieved from the 2014 Health Behaviour in School-Aged Children study. The cross-national design of the study enabled us to aggregate weight-evaluation standards for 41 countries and subsequently identify a large sample of 8132 immigrant adolescents in 23 receiving countries from 41 heritage countries. The influence of heritage- and receiving country standards of evaluation was assessed using cross-classified multilevel models. Results: Descriptive analyses reveal considerable differences in weight-evaluation standards between the countries. We find evidence of a significant influence of both heritage- and receiving culture standards of evaluation, with a stronger impact of receiving culture standards. Stratified analyses reveal a stronger influence of heritage culture standards among first- than among second-generation immigrants, and a stronger influence of receiving culture standards among second- than among first-generation immigrants. Conclusions: The results corroborate our expectations regarding the persistency of cultural standards and help to understand inter-ethnic differences in weight-status assessment. [less ▲]

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See detailTrajectories of Steel – The Making Of A Transnational Migrant Community
Santana, Dominique UL

Scientific Conference (2019, June 18)

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See detailPhase field fracture model for viscoplastic materials in large deformations
Kabore, Brice Wendlassida UL; Loew, Pascal Juergen UL; Peters, Bernhard UL

Scientific Conference (2019, June 13)

Phase-field modeling approach to material fracture and damage has received a growing interest among researchers. It has proven to be an effective way to address crack related discontinuities in continuum ... [more ▼]

Phase-field modeling approach to material fracture and damage has received a growing interest among researchers. It has proven to be an effective way to address crack related discontinuities in continuum mechanics. Also, it solves the problem related to tracking the fracture surface by simply representing the fracture phase with a continuous field variable. Recently, phase-field fracture models have been extended to finite deformations, crack nucleation and applied to complex material behaviors such as plasticity and viscoplasticity. In this contribution we describe a viscoplastic model coupled with a phase-field dynamic fracture model in a large strain formulation. The model include damage, history, rate and temperature dependent behavior. A finite element implementation is presented in a staggered time integration. Moreover, we address the crack closure and crack surfaces interpenetration taking into account tension-compression strength asymmetry. Performance of the model on dynamic crack propagation are presented. [less ▲]

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See detailLe rôle du Pôle Européen de Développement entre le Luxembourg, la Belgique et la France dans l’émergence d’un territoire transfrontalier
Pigeron-Piroth, Isabelle UL; Belkacem, Rachid

Scientific Conference (2019, June 07)

Au pays des trois frontières (Athus en Belgique, Longwy en France, Pétange au Luxembourg), ces territoires ont connu une histoire commune du déclin industriel. Dans le cadre de programme européen de ... [more ▼]

Au pays des trois frontières (Athus en Belgique, Longwy en France, Pétange au Luxembourg), ces territoires ont connu une histoire commune du déclin industriel. Dans le cadre de programme européen de reconversion de ces espaces, l'implantation d'un pôle européen de développement au milieu des années 1980, a constitué le principal instrument de reconversion de ces territoires. Après 20 ans de fonctionnement, le PED a produit différents effets sur la structuration de ces territoires transfrontaliers : une diversification inégale de part et d'autre des frontières du tissu productif local, une accélération des mobilités transfrontalières avec le développement du travail frontalier, un accroissement de la population locale avec de nouveaux profils sociologiques qui marque de nouvelle logique de mobilité résidentielle, ... Si le PED a permis d'amortir fortement la crise du système productif local, il a néanmoins contribué à diversifier les trajectoires de développement territorial de part et d'autre des frontières. On voit se dessiner au pays des trois frontières, un nouveau modèle de segmentation territoriale traduisant la juxtaposition de zones d'activités dynamiques d'un côté de la frontière avec des territoires à vocation résidentielle de l'autre côté de la frontière. [less ▲]

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See detailNetworks and Governance of Local Food Systems. The case of Food Policy Councils
Reckinger, Rachel UL

Scientific Conference (2019, June 06)

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See detailA Socially Balanced European Economic Governance?
Muñoz, Susana UL

Scientific Conference (2019, June 06)

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See detailMagnetic neutron scattering studies on Nd-Fe-B magnets (Keynote Lecture)
Michels, Andreas UL

Scientific Conference (2019, June 05)

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