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See detailStatic load deflection experiment on a beam for damage detection using the Deformation Area Difference Method
Erdenebat, Dolgion UL; Waldmann, Danièle UL; Teferle, Felix Norman UL

Scientific Conference (in press)

A reliable and safety infrastructure for both transport and traffic is becoming increasingly important today. The condition assessment of bridges remains difficult and new methods must be found to provide ... [more ▼]

A reliable and safety infrastructure for both transport and traffic is becoming increasingly important today. The condition assessment of bridges remains difficult and new methods must be found to provide reliable information. A meaningful in-situ assessment of bridges requires very detailed investigations which cannot be guaranteed by commonly used methods. It is known that the structural response to external loading is influenced by local damages. However, the detection of local damage depends on many factors such as environmental effects (e.g. temperature), construction layer (e.g. asphalt) and accuracy of the structural response measurement. Within the paper, a new so-called Deformation Area Difference (DAD) Method is presented. The DAD method is based on a load deflection experiment and does not require a reference measurement of initial condition. Therefore, the DAD method can be applied on existing bridges. Moreover, the DAD method uses the most modern technologies such as high precision measurement techniques and attempts to combine digital photogrammetry with drone applications. The DAD method uses information given in the curvature course from a theoretical model of the structure and compares it to real measurements. The paper shows results from a laboratory load-deflection experiment with a steel beam which has been gradually damaged at distinct positions. The load size is chosen so that the maximum deflection does not exceed the serviceability limit state. With the data obtained by the laboratory experiment, the damage degree, which can still be detected by the DAD method, is described. Furthermore, the influence of measurement accuracy on damage detection is discussed. [less ▲]

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See detailSequential Resource Distribution Technique for Multi-User OFDM-SWIPT based Cooperative Networks
Gautam, Sumit UL; Lagunas, Eva UL; Chatzinotas, Symeon UL et al

Scientific Conference (2018, December)

In this paper, we investigate resource allocation and relay selection in a dual-hop orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM)-based multi-user network where amplify-and-forward (AF) enabled relays ... [more ▼]

In this paper, we investigate resource allocation and relay selection in a dual-hop orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM)-based multi-user network where amplify-and-forward (AF) enabled relays facilitate simultaneous wireless information and power transfer (SWIPT) to the end-users. In this context, we address an optimization problem to maximize the end-users’ sum-rate subjected to transmit power and harvested energy constraints. Furthermore, the problem is formulated for both time-switching (TS) and power-splitting (PS) SWIPT schemes.We aim at optimizing the users’ SWIPT splitting factors as well as sub-carrier–destination assignment, sub-carrier pairing, and relay–destination coupling metrics. This kind of joint evaluation is combinatorial in nature with non-linear structure involving mixed-integer programming. In this vein, we propose a sub-optimal low complex sequential resource distribution (SRD) method to solve the aforementioned problem. The performance of the proposed SRD technique is compared with a semi-random resource allocation and relay selection approach. Simulation results reveal the benefits of the proposed design under several parameter values with various operating conditions to illustrate the efficiency of SWIPT schemes for the proposed techniques. [less ▲]

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See detailOn the impact of tokenizer and parameters on N-gram based Code Analysis
Jimenez, Matthieu UL; Cordy, Maxime UL; Le Traon, Yves UL et al

Scientific Conference (2018, September)

Recent research shows that language models, such as n-gram models, are useful at a wide variety of software engineering tasks, e.g., code completion, bug identification, code summarisation, etc. However ... [more ▼]

Recent research shows that language models, such as n-gram models, are useful at a wide variety of software engineering tasks, e.g., code completion, bug identification, code summarisation, etc. However, such models require the appropriate set of numerous parameters. Moreover, the different ways one can read code essentially yield different models (based on the different sequences of tokens). In this paper, we focus on n- gram models and evaluate how the use of tokenizers, smoothing, unknown threshold and n values impact the predicting ability of these models. Thus, we compare the use of multiple tokenizers and sets of different parameters (smoothing, unknown threshold and n values) with the aim of identifying the most appropriate combinations. Our results show that the Modified Kneser-Ney smoothing technique performs best, while n values are depended on the choice of the tokenizer, with values 4 or 5 offering a good trade-off between entropy and computation time. Interestingly, we find that tokenizers treating the code as simple text are the most robust ones. Finally, we demonstrate that the differences between the tokenizers are of practical importance and have the potential of changing the conclusions of a given experiment. [less ▲]

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See detailTapping the Potential of Diverse Founding Teams for Firm Growth: The Role of New Venture Activities
Tryba, Anne UL; Patzelt, Holger; Breugst, Nicola

Scientific Conference (2018, August)

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See detailResource Allocation and Relay Selection for Multi-User OFDM-Based Cooperative Networks with SWIPT
Gautam, Sumit UL; Lagunas, Eva UL; Chatzinotas, Symeon UL et al

Scientific Conference (2018, August)

In this paper, we investigate resource allocation and relay selection in a two-hop relay-assisted multi-user network, where the end users support Simultaneous Wireless Information and Power Transfer ... [more ▼]

In this paper, we investigate resource allocation and relay selection in a two-hop relay-assisted multi-user network, where the end users support Simultaneous Wireless Information and Power Transfer (SWIPT). In particular, we consider single source assisted by a set of spatially distributed relays able to amplify-and-forward orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) signals carrying both data and power at the same time. The users are assumed to implement a power splitting technique where the received signal is orthogonally split in two streams of different power levels, where one signal stream is sent to the power harvesting module while the other is converted to baseband for information decoding. We aim at optimizing the users’ power splitting ratios as well as the relay, carrier and power assignment so that the end-users’ sum-rate is maximized subject to transmitted and harvested power constraints. Such joint optimization is combinatorial in nature with a non-convex structure. Therefore, we present a sub-optimal low complex solution based on the harmonic mean of the two-hop relay channel coefficients. Simulation results reveal that the proposed algorithm provides significant performance gains in comparison with a semi-random resource allocation and relay selection approach. [less ▲]

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See detailThe Challenge of Situating Sacred Wind Music on the Example of Laurent Menager (1835-1902)
Duhr, Marlène UL

Scientific Conference (2018, July 20)

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See detailGlobal inequalities 1980-2050: a microdata oriented simulation – Worldsim
Chauvel, Louis UL; Bar-Haim, Eyal UL; Hartung, Anne UL et al

Scientific Conference (2018, July 13)

Former global inequality models lack realistic features of the population (age, gender, education, behavior). Worldsim develops a panel sample based simulation of the world population until 2050, relying ... [more ▼]

Former global inequality models lack realistic features of the population (age, gender, education, behavior). Worldsim develops a panel sample based simulation of the world population until 2050, relying on UN, Cepii, etc, big data aggregated forecasts, that we individually disaggregate. The simulation confirms the decline of the world's Gini index, but underlines several paradoxes in the socioecodemography of the world, with increasing gaps between resources and needs. Compared to more standard socioeconomic simulations of inequalities, we provide more substantial characterization of the population, and compared to other global simulations, we capture the dimensions of social divergences between social groups and geographic regions. [less ▲]

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See detailHow working conditions influence work-related anger
Steffgen, Georges UL; Sischka, Philipp UL

Scientific Conference (2018, July 13)

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See detailPsychological contact violation or basic need frustration? Psychological mechanisms behind the effects of workplace bullying.
Sischka, Philipp UL; Steffgen, Georges UL

Scientific Conference (2018, July 12)

Workplace bullying is a serious phenomenon that has serious detrimental effects on victim’s health, attitudes, and work-related behavior. However, research that examines the mechanisms behind these ... [more ▼]

Workplace bullying is a serious phenomenon that has serious detrimental effects on victim’s health, attitudes, and work-related behavior. However, research that examines the mechanisms behind these relations is still sparse. Two theories that may explain the links between workplace bullying and various negative outcomes are social exchange theory and self-determination theory. Drawing on these theories, we hypothesized that the relationship between workplace bullying and various outcomes is mediated by perceptions of psychological contract violation and the frustration of basic psychological needs (i.e. autonomy, competence, relatedness). Therefore, the aim of our study was to test these mediators separately and simultaneously to see whether they have an incremental mediation effect between workplace bullying and well-being, work satisfaction, engagement, performance, burnout, workplace deviance and turnover intentions. An online survey design was employed and data were collected among U.S. employees. The final sample consists of 1,408 respondents (56.6% females, n=798, age: M=37.3, SD =10.4). Single mediation analysis within a structural equation modeling framework revealed that psychological contract violation acted as a mediator for all outcome variables. Furthermore, basic need frustrations were also meaningfully mediators between workplace bullying and all outcomes, but different need frustration were differently linked with them. The multiple mediation analyses mainly supported the hypothesized importance of the mediators for the different outcomes. The study findings advance the field through identifying the most important mediators between workplace bullying and several outcome variables guiding possible interventions. [less ▲]

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See detailThe Reasons of Older people for the Use or Non-use of Assistive Technologies:
A Systematic Review of Qualitative Studies
Abrilahij, Afsaneh UL; Boll, Thomas UL

Scientific Conference (2018, July 06)

The baby boomer generation is aging and the proportion of older people in the population is increasing. While people age, functional, cognitive, and physical problems increase. Assistive technology (AT ... [more ▼]

The baby boomer generation is aging and the proportion of older people in the population is increasing. While people age, functional, cognitive, and physical problems increase. Assistive technology (AT) can help to overcome some activity limitations relevant to aging. Although ATs have potential benefits (e.g., to reduce the burden of caregivers, to increase independence), their usage rate is still low. Whereas several reviews of quantitative studies on factors of ATs use already exist, a systematic review of qualitative research about AT use is still missing. The aim of the current review is to provide more differentiated answers about what makes some older people use ATs while others not. Based on systematic literature searches in PsycINFO, MEDLINE, and Google Scholar databases 18 relevant papers were identified according to our selection criteria. These studies were based on to self-reported reasons of older people for using or not-using diverse types of ATs designed for many different activities. We classified the key reasons as referring to three aspects: attributes of “potential technology users”, “context”, and “technology”. Perceived usefulness and attitudes towards use were the most common “personal” reasons and social impact by significant others was the most common “contextual” reason, and technology design was the most common “technological” reason influencing use or non-use of ATs. We discussed the identified reasons in relation to the major models of developmental self-regulation and action-theoretical approaches to development in age. Based on the current review, we generated methodological and theoretical recommendations for future research and for practical applications. [less ▲]

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See detailComparative Evaluation of Models of Assistive Technologies’ Use
Abrilahij, Afsaneh UL; Boll, Thomas UL

Scientific Conference (2018, July 06)

Many older people have functional limitations and are at risk of losing their ability to live autonomously. Assistive Technology (AT) could help to reduce that risk. However, many older people don’t use ... [more ▼]

Many older people have functional limitations and are at risk of losing their ability to live autonomously. Assistive Technology (AT) could help to reduce that risk. However, many older people don’t use ATs. Our presentation reviews existing models of ATs use, their applicability to specific types of AT, predictive value, fundamental elements, and critiques of such models. In systematic literature searches in PsycINFO, MEDLINE, and Google Scholar 46 papers were identified that met our inclusion criteria. 32 papers covered models of ATs use, applicability to special types of ATs, components of models, and their predictive value. 14 papers cover criticisms of models of AT use. We classified the models into two groups: The first included 11 models focusing on individuals’ mental states (e.g., beliefs, desires) as factors explaining ATs use; the second included 22 models that also considered contextual factors (e.g., social influence, physical environment) in addition to individuals’ mental states. Across both groups the most frequently included explanatory components were subjective norm and personal attitudes towards AT use, followed by perceived usefulness, perceived ease of use and then intention to use. Models were most frequently applied to information technologies followed by application to socially assistive robots. Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology 2 (UTAUT2) and an extended version of Technology Acceptance Model showed the highest amount of explained variance in intention to use (56-74%) and an extended model of UTAUT in actual use of ATs (64%). We conclude with recommendations for further improvement of AT use models. [less ▲]

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See detailNational, European or Cosmopolitan identification? Insights from the heart of Europe
Murdock, Elke UL; Kraus, Xavier; Ferring, Dieter UL

Scientific Conference (2018, July 04)

Trilingual Luxembourg shares borders with three European countries and has a foreign population percentage of 47%. Given this multicultural context we wanted to explore firstly the national, supra ... [more ▼]

Trilingual Luxembourg shares borders with three European countries and has a foreign population percentage of 47%. Given this multicultural context we wanted to explore firstly the national, supra-national or non-national identification among the native population, secondly their stereotypical judgements of EU Member State countries and attitudes towards the European Union and thirdly identify predictors for cosmopolitanism. With a sentence completion task we investigated the reasons for a feeling of belonging to a national entity or lack of it. All 255 participants in our study (Mage = 38.8 SD = 10.7, 59% female) had Luxembourgish citizenship. Forty percent provided a national self-identification (“Luxembourger”), 36% supra-national identification (“European”) and 24% a non-national identification (“cosmopolitan”). These three groups did not differ in terms of stereotypical assessments of the EU Member states regarding warmth and competence (stereotype content model). Yet, when asked about their own assessment of Luxembourg, differences occurred with supra- and non-national identifiers providing significantly lower ratings under the self-rating condition. The three groups differed in their attitude towards the European Union. Low commitment (MEIM subscale), high contact with non-natives and group self-identification predicted cosmopolitanism. There were no effects in terms of self-efficacy, age, gender or socioeconomic status. The content analysis of the sentence completion exercise revealed that affective components dominated arguments for belonging whereas cognitive reasoning governed the statements expressing a lack of belonging. The implications of these findings among natives within the multicultural context of Luxembourg will be discussed – against the rise of nationalism in many European countries and beyond. [less ▲]

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See detailAn n-ary generalization of the concept of distance
Kiss, Gergely; Marichal, Jean-Luc UL; Teheux, Bruno UL

Scientific Conference (2018, July 03)

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See detailAssociative and quasitrivial operations on finite sets: characterizations and enumeration
Couceiro, Miguel; Devillet, Jimmy UL; Marichal, Jean-Luc UL

Scientific Conference (2018, July 02)

We investigate the class of binary associative and quasitrivial operations on a given finite set. Here the quasitriviality property (also known as conservativeness) means that the operation always outputs ... [more ▼]

We investigate the class of binary associative and quasitrivial operations on a given finite set. Here the quasitriviality property (also known as conservativeness) means that the operation always outputs one of its input values. We also examine the special situations where the operations are commutative and nondecreasing, in which cases the operations reduce to discrete uninorms (which are discrete fuzzy connectives playing an important role in fuzzy logic). Interestingly, associative and quasitrivial operations that are nondecreasing are characterized in terms of total and weak orderings through the so-called single-peakedness property introduced in social choice theory by Duncan Black. We also address and solve a number of enumeration issues: we count the number of binary associative and quasitrivial operations on a given finite set as well as the number of those operations that are commutative and/or nondecreasing. [less ▲]

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See detailThe Multicultural Ideology Scale (MIS): Factor structure and measurement invariance
Stogianni, Maria UL; Murdock, Elke UL

Scientific Conference (2018, July 02)

The concept of multiculturalism has been widely used in cross-cultural research to describe positive attitudes towards a culturally plural society and practices that support cultural diversity. To date ... [more ▼]

The concept of multiculturalism has been widely used in cross-cultural research to describe positive attitudes towards a culturally plural society and practices that support cultural diversity. To date, attitudes towards multiculturalism among majority and minority group members have been assessed with the same instruments. However, there is little psychometric evidence that these measures operate appropriately in various cultural contexts. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the factor structure of the Multicultural Ideology Scale (MIS; Berry & Kalin, 1995) and test its measurement invariance across different language versions and ethnic groups. The entire sample consisted of 1572 adolescents and adults in Luxembourg, including native majority members (N = 693) and immigrants from diverse ethnic backgrounds (N = 879). Participants were given the option to complete the questionnaire in one of the following languages: English, German or French. The unidimensional model of multicultural ideology did not show an acceptable fit of the data across all language versions of the MIS. Exploratory and confirmatory factorial analyses revealed a two-factor structure, which was partially invariant across two different language versions (English and German). The two factors reflected positive and negative attitudes towards cultural diversity respectively. Subsequent multigroup confirmatory factor analyses supported configural and metric invariance across majority and minority group members. Scalar invariance was not established, indicating that respondents across these two groups conceptualize multiculturalism in different ways. Implications of these findings are discussed together with methodological issues concerning the assessment of measurement invariance. [less ▲]

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See detailOn associative, idempotent, symmetric, and nondecreasing operations
Devillet, Jimmy UL; Teheux, Bruno UL

Scientific Conference (2018, July 02)

see attached file

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See detailApprentissage formel, non-formel et informel de musique dans la communauté. Comment correspondent-ils
Sagrillo, Damien UL

Scientific Conference (2018, July 02)

Tandis que le concept de l’apprentissage formel, non-formel et informel est supposé connu en ce qui concerne ses orientations générales, il en est moins pour la pédagogie musicale. Sa vue sous différents ... [more ▼]

Tandis que le concept de l’apprentissage formel, non-formel et informel est supposé connu en ce qui concerne ses orientations générales, il en est moins pour la pédagogie musicale. Sa vue sous différents angles, notamment sous l’optique de la musique pour amateurs, fera l’objet de ma communication. De l'autre côté, le concept de musique dans la communauté est emprunté de l’anglais « community music ». Celui-ci signifie que la pratique des amateurs de musique est fondée sur des activités de loisir. Mais il existe bien d’autres volets qui pourraient être regroupés sous la perspective d’une musique dans ou par la communauté. D’abord il semble qu’il est totalement dissocié des méthodes traditionnelles d’apprentissage musical de nature formelle ou non-formelle. Mais il serait plutôt lié à une éducation de nature informelle qui, cependant, ne peut pas être mise en relation avec l’autodidactie. Des approches récentes la voient en rapport avec l’inclusion et la participation réalisée dans un milieu associatif et comme moyen de surmonter l’obstacle qui existe entre la pédagogie musicale traditionnelle et les exigences de la communauté musicale. De l’autre côté, la musique dans la communauté se présente comme un contre-projet face à la haute culture musicale professionnalisée (Lichtinger 2013). En ce qui concerne le terme de « community music », il n’existe pas de traduction littérale française. Cependant, il est parfaitement approprié de retracer le processus d’une éducation musicale des jeunes qui commence souvent par une phase amateur pour mener par après à la vie professionnelle pour les plus doués, soit pour décrire la formation et la vie musicale des jeunes amateurs, soit pour retracer la vie de musicien amateur tout au long de la vie de ces musicophiles. Dans ma communication, je présenterai des définitions pour chacun des trois aspects de formation musicale n’ignorant pas que surtout pour l’éducation musicale de type non-formel il n’existe pas de consensus. Ensuite, je mettrai en relation les deux concepts – i.e. celui des trois aspects de formation musicale et celui de la musique dans la communauté – en donnant des exemples d’une pratique musicale très répandue, à savoir la musique à vent (et/ou chant choral) pour enfin comparer des modèles d’apprentissage musical tels qu’ils existent et sont appliqués dans différents pays européens liés à cette tradition. [less ▲]

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See detailReduced modulatory effects of distraction on pain due to aging
Siquier, A; Prats, MA; Montoya, P et al

Scientific Conference (2018, July)

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See detailToward a new model of collaborative problem solving definition and assessment
Stoeffler, K.; Greiff, Samuel UL; Von Davier, A. et al

Scientific Conference (2018, July)

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See detailIntroducing MaFIN. A dynamic matrices finite state automata test
Kunze, Thiemo UL; Krieger, Florian UL; Stadler, Matthias UL et al

Scientific Conference (2018, July)

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See detailGenerating Multi-Categorical Samples with Generative Adversarial Networks
Camino, Ramiro Daniel UL; Hammerschmidt, Christian UL; State, Radu UL

Scientific Conference (2018, July)

We propose a method to train generative adversarial networks on mutivariate feature vectors representing multiple categorical values. In contrast to the continuous domain, where GAN-based methods have ... [more ▼]

We propose a method to train generative adversarial networks on mutivariate feature vectors representing multiple categorical values. In contrast to the continuous domain, where GAN-based methods have delivered considerable results, GANs struggle to perform equally well on discrete data. We propose and compare several architectures based on multiple (Gumbel) softmax output layers taking into account the structure of the data. We evaluate the performance of our architecture on datasets with different sparsity, number of features, ranges of categorical values, and dependencies among the features. Our proposed architecture and method outperforms existing models. [less ▲]

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See detailTowards a multifaceted framework of complex problem solving
Stadler, Matthias UL; Niepel, Christoph UL; Greiff, Samuel UL

Scientific Conference (2018, July)

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See detailZusammenarbeit mit den Eltern und Valorisieren der Familiensprachen mit der App iTEO.
Kirsch, Claudine UL

Scientific Conference (2018, June 26)

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See detailFlachdecken in Verbundbauweise Bemessung und Konstruktion von Slim-Floor-Trägern
Schäfer, Markus UL

Scientific Conference (2018, June 22)

Presentation of basic information for design of slim-floor beams and presentation of executed projects

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See detailKommentar zu DIN EN 1994-1-1, Verbundtragwerke aus Stahl und BEton
Schäfer, Markus UL; Hanswile, Gerhard

Scientific Conference (2018, June 22)

Design of Composite Structures in steel and concrete according to EN 1994-1-1, presentation of special requirements and boundary conditions for the design of composite beams and columns.

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See detailEmergent Multilinguals Learning Languages with the iPad app iTEO
Aleksic, Gabrijela UL; Kirsch, Claudine UL

Scientific Conference (2018, June 22)

This presentation showed the results of a small-scale study led by Ass. Prof. Claudine Kirsch that investigated language learning in primary schools in Luxembourg and the ways in which this process is ... [more ▼]

This presentation showed the results of a small-scale study led by Ass. Prof. Claudine Kirsch that investigated language learning in primary schools in Luxembourg and the ways in which this process is mediated by peers and the iPad app iTEO. This study draws its data from the larger longitudinal qualitative research project iTEO (2013–2017) and is based on 10 hours of audio and video-recordings. The participants were 6–7-year-olds learning German and French. The presentation focused on the ways in which the emergent multilingual primary school children scaffold each other’s learning of French while collaboratively producing oral texts on iTEO. The findings show that the children’s language learning was mediated by peers, the task and the app. The children used a range of learning and teaching strategies while completing tasks framed by their teacher. iTEO and the task together mobilised the children’s resources, encouraged autonomy and promoted discussion about language. The presentation linked the results with the other projects during the COST DigitLitey meeting. For example, the link was made with the work with robots in early childhood education and the use of Cubetto, a robot toy teaching kids code and programming and encouraging collaboration and storytelling. The presentation was followed by a discussion on the use of digital tools in early childhood education settings. Keywords: The iPad app, iTEO, peers, language learning, mediation, primary school Source: Kirsch, C. & Bes Izuel, A. (2016). Emergent multilinguals learning languages with the IPad app iTEO: a study in primary schools in Luxembourg, The Language Learning Journal, 2016. https://doi.org/10.1080/09571736.2016.1258721 This work was funded by the University of Luxembourg under Grant PUL R-AGR-0222; Ministry of National Education, Childhood and Youth under SCRIPT. [less ▲]

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See detailOn bisymmetric and quasitrivial operations
Devillet, Jimmy UL

Scientific Conference (2018, June 21)

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See detailExploring Multilingual Pedagogies: Forced Migrants’ Learning Experiences in Luxembourg
Kalocsanyiova, Erika UL

Scientific Conference (2018, June 20)

While most societies are structured around diverse flows of people and complex linguistic repertoires, (language) education schemes are still dominated by monolingual instructional practices. This paper ... [more ▼]

While most societies are structured around diverse flows of people and complex linguistic repertoires, (language) education schemes are still dominated by monolingual instructional practices. This paper aims to contribute to current discussions on the affordances of multilingual pedagogies in contexts of forced migration. It draws on a range of linguistic ethnographic data (Copland & Creese, 2015) that was collected over the period of 2016-2017 in diverse settings of language learning and socialization. Our research sites in Luxembourg included language courses in French, English and German, mathematics courses, application and web development training, and diverse leisure activities. Having followed the learning trajectory of five asylum applicants, we explored how they built on their old and newly-acquired language resources. Our findings confirm that in order to make their voices heard, the learners often drew upon elements from multiple languages, including those local languages they had no extensive competence in. This multilingual orientation enabled them to see the local languages as new functional resources in their growing repertoires (Kalocsányiová, 2017). This is of special relevance in contexts of forced migration, where learners need to become users of the languages they are learning from the first day onward. [less ▲]

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See detailThe implementation of Circular Economy policies: A challenge for institutions and practices
Hild, Paula UL

Scientific Conference (2018, June 14)

Since 2014, the Grand Duchy of Luxembourg’s national policy aims at transitioning the national economy from a linear to a circular model. However, we do not know so far how the different socio-economic ... [more ▼]

Since 2014, the Grand Duchy of Luxembourg’s national policy aims at transitioning the national economy from a linear to a circular model. However, we do not know so far how the different socio-economic actors in the country deal with this new political vision. Thus, the overall aim of the CIRCULUX research project is to analyse the effectiveness of the circular economy policy in Luxembourg by studying institutions and practices in businesses. In this way, we follow authors who claim for the systematic inclusion of institutions into the analysis of policy effectiveness (Glückler and Lenz, 2016). We assume that institutions explain sectoral differences in the efficacy of circular economy policies, in analogy to Bathelt and Glückler (2014) who state that in a comparative study, institutions enable to clarify regional differences. Focusing on two different industries, the building sector and the automotive supply industry, we hope to explore the variety of circular economy practices, and therefore as well theoretical and pragmatic implications between the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals 9 (Industry, Innovation, and Infrastructure) and 12 (Responsible Consumption and Production). The research follows a qualitative research approach, including documentary analysis, up to 20 exploratory and around 50 semi-structured expert interviews. We intend to capture different dimensions of the motivations and barriers of companies for shifting towards circularity, by triangulation of these three datasets. In the analysis of data, we consider different levels and emphasise on three points highlighted by various authors for a need for further consideration. The first aspect focus on the socio-cultural specificities of Luxembourg and related challenges for the implementation of a circular economy (e.g., the mix of technical standards, multilingualism, corporate cultures). The second aspect covers the internal dynamics of actor networks and hybrid organisations that aim to bring circular economy theory into practice (Schulz and Preller, 2016). Moreover, the third aspect deals with the articulation between sustainability effectiveness and the cost from the perspectives of various stakeholders (Ruparathna and Hewage, 2015). The preliminary results put forward the interdependence of the actors’ perception of what would mean a circular economy model for Luxembourg. They also reveal the firm’s specific role in this system. The decision of a business actor to implement a circular economy practice depends primarily on its return on investment, the general regulatory pressure and the maturity of the industry and the company. In general, the hindrance for circularity is not the absence of a technological or technical solution. Interviews with experts from the business sector reveal that notably economic factors are hindering circularity in companies. Besides, the maturity of the firm given its awareness for concepts like the circular economy, sustainable development, or sustainability shapes its vision for the future in this field actively. As a push for action, interviewees suggested a regulatory framework for circularity. [less ▲]

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See detailSoftening and melting modeling of iron ore particles using a discrete - continuous coupling method
Baniasadi, Mehdi UL; Baniasadi, Maryam; Peters, Bernhard UL

Scientific Conference (2018, June 13)

The blast furnace iron making is the main method to produce liquid iron. A blast furnace is charged with ore and coke from the top along with a preheated gas introduced to the furnace through the tuyeres ... [more ▼]

The blast furnace iron making is the main method to produce liquid iron. A blast furnace is charged with ore and coke from the top along with a preheated gas introduced to the furnace through the tuyeres in the lower part. The combustion of coke generates reducing gas ascending through the blast furnace to reduce iron-bearing materials. The reduced iron-bearing particles start softening and melting because of the weight of burden above and the high temperature in the middle of the blast furnace so-called cohesive zone. In this region, as particles are softened, the void space between particles decreases. As the temperature increases further, the softened particles start melting and generate two different liquids: molten iron and slag. Then the generated liquids trickle down to the lower part of the blast furnace. The softening and melting process forms the impermeable ferrous layers forcing gas to flow horizontally through the permeable coke windows. This causes a high-pressure drop. Softening and melting has a big effect on the operation of the blast furnace and since it is not possible to interrupt the blast furnace to investigate details of the phenomena occurring inside, the numerical simulation becomes more practical. In this contribution, the eXtended Discrete Element Method (XDEM) [1] as an advanced numerical tool based on the Eulerian-Lagrangian framework, is used. Within this platform, the gas and liquid phases are described by computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and the soft-sphere discrete element approach (DEM) is used for the coke and iron ore particles. Continuous phases are coupled to the discrete entities through mass, momentum, and energy exchange. Moreover, the internal temperature distribution of the particles is described. Therefore, the XDEM is able to model multiphase and multiscale phenomena as can occur in the cohesive zone. The particle's deformation, temperature, melting, and shrinking along with gas and liquids pressure, temperature and velocity patterns are examined using the XDEM method. [less ▲]

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See detailEBC network
Lehnert, Thorsten UL

Scientific Conference (2018, June 12)

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See detailDetecting Public Health crises: APC-Detrended methodology and residuals in a 25-country, 35-year mortality matrix
Chauvel, Louis UL; Leist, Anja UL; Smith, Herbert

Scientific Conference (2018, June 09)

Background. Mortality-by-cause analyses as done in the Global Burden of Disease 2016 update are helpful to monitor progress of public health improvements within and across countries. However, separate ... [more ▼]

Background. Mortality-by-cause analyses as done in the Global Burden of Disease 2016 update are helpful to monitor progress of public health improvements within and across countries. However, separate analyses by cause and country miss larger patterns of public health crises that are restricted to certain cohorts and periods. Those public health crises may go unnoticed even if they affect several countries and thus come with some threat potential. We propose a new method to detect cohorts with increased mortality at certain ages and periods. Method. We develop an analytical and visualizing technique based on established Age-Period-Cohort-Detrended (APCD) methodology (Chauvel and Schröder 2014). After detecting all-cause mortality increases, plotting the resulting age-period coefficients and APCD residuals in equilateral Lexis diagrams, mortality patterns can be distinguished as age, period, or cohort trends and fluctuations. Age-period interactions are plotted as ‘big red spots’. We employ the new technique in data from the Human Mortality Database, spanning 25-60 years of age, calendar years 1975-2010, and 25 countries. Results. We detect age-period interactions of young-adult cohorts in the early 1990s in Spain, other southern European countries and the U.S. Additional analyses with WHO mortality data show that mortality increases are mostly due to increased HIV/AIDS mortality. Discussion. Country-specific explanations, such as political frustrations in Spain, have been proposed to explain the 1990s increases in HIV/AIDS mortality. However, the new technique suggests that increases in HIV/AIDS mortality were more likely to be due to specific behaviors of cohorts of certain ages in a certain period. We discuss limitations of the method, such as detecting social class mortality differences of affected cohorts. Altogether, the new technique offers intuitive and efficient handling of large amounts of age-country-year mortality information. The method can further be applied in the fields of education, longevity, and demography at large. [less ▲]

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See detailDesigning personalized, interactive materials for presentation skills
Deroey, Katrien UL

Scientific Conference (2018, June 09)

In this talk I demonstrate how we can design and adapt materials for presentation skills to build on students’ individual needs and disciplinary backgrounds in an interactive way. The context for this is ... [more ▼]

In this talk I demonstrate how we can design and adapt materials for presentation skills to build on students’ individual needs and disciplinary backgrounds in an interactive way. The context for this is a conference skills course I’ve designed and successfully taught for several years. The PhD students on this course vary greatly in their presentation skills, experience and disciplinary background. After an overview of the course content and format, I illustrate how students’ own presentations and research can be integrated so as to enhance personal relevance and interactivity. Aspects of this personalized, interactive course design include filming student presentations, structured peer feedback and reflection, a pre-course questionnaire, and tasks requiring them to work with their conference calls, research, texts, visuals and experiences. I conclude with a summary of course feedback, highlighting what students reported as being particularly useful and what they would add or change. [less ▲]

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See detailFoodscapes in Transition: Policies and Politics Advancing Sustainable Development and Social Justice
Reckinger, Rachel UL; Wahlen, Stefan

Scientific Conference (2018, June 07)

In this session, we would like to discuss the impact, risks and motivations of producers and consumers altering foodscapes. Of particular interest are enabling types of governance that improve ecological ... [more ▼]

In this session, we would like to discuss the impact, risks and motivations of producers and consumers altering foodscapes. Of particular interest are enabling types of governance that improve ecological balance and social justice in policies of governmental regulation and institutions but also in the politics of for example alternative food movements. The main impact that heterodox actors can have seems to be, on one hand, the creation of resourcefulness from innovative niches, not designed to be upscaled but spread by ubiquitous networking and, on the other hand, the exemplification of heterodox economic practices that reduce the current deskilling of producers and consumers and the depletion of natural resources. The risk associated with heterodox initiatives is, besides basic economic viability, territorial competition over land and resources, as well as – more insidiously – the potential of co-option by neoliberal corporate agendas. The motivations of actors involved in such social movements, albeit diverse, tend to stem from a stance of care and ethical (self)government, often using community self-organisation-tools. Such an analysis of food value chain practices focuses on negotiations and struggles among actors in a multifaceted foodscape, where some block and some enhance transitions. Viewing the relationships, interconnectedness and agency of niche innovations and regime hegemonies opens up the perspective of contested knowledge claims. Additionally, the ways in which actors in the regulatory field advance transitions by policy measures and initiatives need to be considered, and in particular the processes of politicization as interdependencies between movement actors and the public sphere. Yet, the daily practices stay embedded in social, cultural and economic constraints and in routines, which are built on tacit knowledge, collective learning and engrained practices; even though repetitive, they can account for both reproduction and innovation. Which types of governance at all levels have shown themselves to be effective in supporting and empowering such bottom-up changes in “knowing and growing food in a contested arena” (Goodman, DuPuis, Goodman, 2014)? [less ▲]

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See detailOn biselective operations
Devillet, Jimmy UL; Kiss, Gergely UL

Scientific Conference (2018, June 07)

See attached file

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See detailGovernance and Price Jumps
Lehnert, Thorsten UL

Scientific Conference (2018, June 07)

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See detailAlternative Actors in the Foodscape: Enabling Policies and Politics of Contested Claims for Social and Environmental Justice
Reckinger, Rachel UL

Scientific Conference (2018, June 07)

Recently, a number of resourceful community-driven initiatives for local food production and retail have arisen in Luxembourg, where low organic agricultural rates are paired with high consumer demands ... [more ▼]

Recently, a number of resourceful community-driven initiatives for local food production and retail have arisen in Luxembourg, where low organic agricultural rates are paired with high consumer demands for organic produce, leading to a largely imported organic market. As an encompassing reaction, a niche of social innovators are combining agro-ecological land use and food production with locavorousness and circular economy. Based on qualitative interviews and participant observation, we expand on four case studies of fruit and vegetable production as well as unpackaged and/or socially responsible food retail in today’s Luxembourg. One has been established since the 1980s with over 200 employees, partly in social insertion measures, producing and importing organic fruit and vegetables. Since 2014, three significantly smaller initiatives with higher citizen involvement have emerged, with a cooperative governance structure, a claimed community-supported agricultural outlook, a dynamic presence on social media and regular hands-on workshops and activities. These recent initiatives are more radical in their agro-ecological and/or permaculture practices. In a renewed enacting of circular economy precepts, they focus on local production without relying on imports, as a politicized step further than (possibly industrialized) organic production. Grounded in heterodox experiences of alternative actors in food production and retail niches, we analyse ethical entrepreneurship and the governmentality at its core, political enabling or disabling structures and regulations, as well as commodification and upscaling issues. Therefore, this paper touches on governance interrelations between food policies and politics the politics of contested claims for, and practices of, social and environmental justice. [less ▲]

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See detailCompetition and Workplace Bullying. The moderating role of passive avoidant leadership style.
Sischka, Philipp UL; Steffgen, Georges UL

Scientific Conference (2018, June 06)

It has been argued that an organizational climate that is characterized by competition and envy may increase workplace bullying (Salin, 2003, 2015; Vartia, 1996). Employees may be tempted to gain a ... [more ▼]

It has been argued that an organizational climate that is characterized by competition and envy may increase workplace bullying (Salin, 2003, 2015; Vartia, 1996). Employees may be tempted to gain a relative advantage over their colleagues by setting them under pressure, isolating them, undermining or sabotaging their work (Kohn, 1992; Ng, 2017, Salin, 2003), in sum trying to bully them. This should be especially true, when supervisor exhibit a passive avoidant leadership style that is when supervisor are physically in post but fail to carry out their duties (Hoel, Glasø, Hetland, Cooper, & Einarsen, 2010). Therefore, the aim of our study was to test if competition is a potential risk factor for workplace bullying and if this association depends on the level of passive avoidant leadership style. We proposed that competition and passive avoidant leadership style are positive related to workplace bullying victimization and perpetration. Furthermore, we hypothesized that the effect of competition on workplace bullying victimization and perpetration is moderated through passive avoidant leadership style. Amazon Mechanical Turk was used to recruited employees. We followed recent recommendations using MTurk as participant recruiting system (Keith et al., 2017), e.g., prescreening for desired target population, fair payment (i.e. US$0.10 per estimated minute of participation; Chandler & Shapiro, 2016) and data screening methods for insufficient effort responding (McGonagle, Huang, & Walsh, 2016). The final sample consists of 1,411 respondents (56.6% females, n = 798). Respondents age ranged from 20 to 73 (M = 37.3; SD = 10.4). As the self-labelling method and the behavioral method to assess workplace bullying both have its shortcomings (Nielsen, Notelaers, & Einarsen, 2011), both approaches were used. Hierarchical regression analyses showed that competition and passive avoidant leadership style are important predictor for workplace bullying victimization and perpetration. Furthermore, the results indicated that the effect of competition on workplace bullying victimization (measured via behavioral method) and self-labelled workplace bullying victimization and perpetration is moderated through passive avoidant leadership style. However, for workplace bullying perpetration (measured via behavioral method) no moderation effect was found. These findings have important implications for employers that seek to end workplace bullying in their organization. The present study contributes to the workplace bullying literature in at least two ways. First, while recent research has focused on the main effects of competition (e.g., Salin, 2003) and passive avoidant leadership (e.g., Skogstad et al., 2007) on workplace bullying, the present study sheds light on the moderation effect of passive avoidant leadership style on the effect of competition on workplace bullying. Second, not only workplace bullying victimization but also perpetration is considered, that is still an under-researched topic. [less ▲]

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See detailDeveloping multilingual pedagogies in the early years in Luxembourg
Kirsch, Claudine UL

Scientific Conference (2018, June 02)

Dynamic theories of bilingualism acknowledge that language learning is fluid and flexible and that learners activate the entire linguistic repertoire when languaging. Pedagogies that foster ... [more ▼]

Dynamic theories of bilingualism acknowledge that language learning is fluid and flexible and that learners activate the entire linguistic repertoire when languaging. Pedagogies that foster multilingualism are promising in our globalised, heterogeneous and fast developing world, as they call for transglossic spaces and are inclusive (García 2017, Cenoz 2017). The call for the development of multilingual education has been taken up by the Ministry of Education responsible for the formal and non-formal early years education in Luxembourg. Professional standards for practitioners in early years are very high (Wiff 2011) and, therefore, it may be a paradox that poor linguistic knowledge and inadequate pedagogical skills have been reported (Gogolin et al. 2011, Thoma & Tracy 2012). Research findings on professional development indicate that the most effective training is long-term and collaborative, involves more than one person of the same institution, encourages active involvement and reflection, and offers opportunities for transfer (Gogolin et al. 2011, WIFF 2011). The model of professional learning communities where participants collaboratively research their own practice through action-research seems particularly promising (Kincheloe 2012). The professional development that Kirsch, Andersen, Mortini and Günnewig carried out within the research project MuLiPEC takes account of these research findings. The research team offered a 15-hour course to a group of 50 teachers and care-takers, as well as mentoring and coaching sessions to seven participants over the course of one academic year. Topics included language development, multilingualism and activities to promote emergent literacy. A survey of all participants and two interviews with the seven long-term participants demonstrated that the training contributed to changing beliefs and practices. [less ▲]

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See detailTeachers’ perspectives of teaching Greek in a multilingual Greek school in Luxembourg
Kirsch, Claudine UL

Scientific Conference (2018, June 02)

Complementary schools have been said to offer a ‘safe haven’ (Lytra & Martin 2010) for immigrant and ethnic minority children to improve their home language and develop their ethnic and linguistic ... [more ▼]

Complementary schools have been said to offer a ‘safe haven’ (Lytra & Martin 2010) for immigrant and ethnic minority children to improve their home language and develop their ethnic and linguistic identity. While many scholars have emphasized the monolingual ideologies at play in these schools, students and teachers have nevertheless been reported to behave in a multilingual manner (Blackledge & Creese 2010, Li Wei 2014, Lytra 2011). This was true to a lesser extent in a Greek school in Luxembourg where the staff shared monolingual ideologies and tried to reinforce a sense of ‘Greekness’ by emphasizing the cultural prestige of ancient Greek (Tsagkogeorga 2016). Given the arrival of more Greek families to Luxembourg, one wonders to what extent the teachers will reconceptualise their pedagogical practices. The present study draws on interviews with two Greek teachers carried out in January 2017 and 2018. One of the teachers migrated in 2016 to Luxembourg. The interviews focussed on pedagogical practices and changes thereof owing to the arrival of children of newly migrated families who had better linguistic skills than and a different understanding of Greek culture from children of established families. First findings have shown that both teachers spoke positively about multilingualism. They were aware of the children’s differing linguistic, social and educational experiences and explained the challenges this caused for teaching. Nevertheless, they seemed to ignore the children’s repertoires by emphasising the teaching of Greek and offering little spaces to other languages (Kirsch forthcoming). The space attributed to culture differed between the teachers. More data will be collected and analysed thematically. The findings of this paper encourage teachers to reflect on their language policies and teaching approaches, and encourage them to capitalize on their students’ heterogeneity. [less ▲]

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See detailCharacterizations of nondecreasing semilattice operations on chains
Devillet, Jimmy UL; Teheux, Bruno UL

Scientific Conference (2018, June 01)

See attached file

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See detailClones of pivotally decomposable operations
Couceiro, Miguel; Teheux, Bruno UL

Scientific Conference (2018, June)

We investigate the clones of operations that are pivotally decomposable.

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See detailModelling and analysis of flow-driven energy harvesting devices and associated reduced order models
Zilian, Andreas UL; Baroli, Davide UL

Scientific Conference (2018, June)

A specific class of energy harvester devices for renewable energy resources allows conversion of ambient fluid flow energy to electrical energy via flow-induced vibrations of a piezo-ceramic composite ... [more ▼]

A specific class of energy harvester devices for renewable energy resources allows conversion of ambient fluid flow energy to electrical energy via flow-induced vibrations of a piezo-ceramic composite structure positioned in the flow field. This energy converter technology simultaneously involves the interaction of a composite structure and a surrounding fluid, the electric charge accumulated in the piezo-ceramic material and a controlling electrical circuit. In order to predict the efficiency and operational properties of such future devices and to increase their robustness and performance, a mathematical and numerical model of the complex physical system is required to allow systematic computational investigation of the involved phenomena and coupling characteristics. The presentation will discuss a monolithic modelling approach that allows simultaneous analysis of the harvester, which involves surface-coupled fluid-structure interaction, volume-coupled electro-mechanics and a controlling energy harvesting circuit. Based on a finite element discretisation of the weighted residual form of the governing equations, time- and frequency-domain analysis enables investigation of different types of structures (plate, shells) subject to exterior/interior flow with varying parameters, and attached electrical circuits with respect to the electrical power output generated. Consequently, options for parametric reduced-order modelling of flow-driven energy harvesters will be discussed. [less ▲]

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See detailDigital Social Networks of the Past: Issues, Limits and Challenges
Schafer, Valerie UL

Scientific Conference (2018, June)

This contribution, which lies at the intersection of two topics that will be addressed at the conference (Critical study and digital hermeneutical approaches in the humanities, and Humanities research ... [more ▼]

This contribution, which lies at the intersection of two topics that will be addressed at the conference (Critical study and digital hermeneutical approaches in the humanities, and Humanities research enabled by digital approaches), aims to analyse how the study of digital social networks of the past may challenge historians of the Web and digital cultures and help shed light on current issues concerning the heritagisation of social networks. [less ▲]

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See detailHow should entrepreneurial teams behave to achieve firm growth?
Tryba, Anne UL; Breugst, Nicola

Scientific Conference (2018, June)

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See detailIn refugees we trust: Exploring social capital formation from scratch
Iannone, Rosa Lisa UL; Geraudel, Mickaël UL

Scientific Conference (2018, June)

We are currently witnessing the highest levels of displaced people in history, with close to 66 million in a state of forced migration (UNHCR, 2017). Such numbers have placed a lot of stress on hosting ... [more ▼]

We are currently witnessing the highest levels of displaced people in history, with close to 66 million in a state of forced migration (UNHCR, 2017). Such numbers have placed a lot of stress on hosting countries to find solutions for both the social and economic integration of these populations, and in particular, refugees (Bloch, 2014; Lyon, Sepulveda & Syrett, 2007; Phillimore & Goodson, 2006). As Ram, Theodorakopoulos and Jones (2008) have suggested, small businesses and entrepreneurships by migrants illustrates their super-diversity, while highlighting an important labour option through which integration and independence may be achieved. Both opportunity-driven and necessity-driven, refugee entrepreneurs opt for selfemployment in their new countries of residence. In a notable contribution to our knowledge on the phenomenon, Sternberg, von Bloh and Brixy (2016) have evidenced that refugees may even be more likely to start businesses than natives. In accordance, they must often build entirely new social capital (SC) prior to business start-up, also as a strategy for overcoming other types of capital disadvantage. Recent studies that consider SC in relation to refugee entrepreneurship (Basok, 1993; van Kooy, 2016; Bizri, 2017; Sandberg, Immonen & Kok, in press) have emphasised the need to build critical contacts in new countries of residence, given the high value and instrumentality weak ties can bring. There is still a dearth of knowledge regarding refugee entrepreneurship in general, and their processes of SC formation for business start-up in particular. To address this lack of insight, we are undertaking a study that examines the processes of nascent entrepreneurs in a central European capital city. The study explores how SC is created in situations where nascent entrepreneurs are forced to ‘start from scratch’. That is, refugees engaging in entrepreneurial activity, who are dependent on relationships when starting their business, but have little or nothing to draw from. Leading from this, the research question undertaken in this study is a processual one: how do refugee entrepreneurs build the SC they require to start their businesses? In this paper, we adopt the threefold perspective of SC, as defined by Nahapiet and Ghoshall (1998): structural, cognitive and relational. Interrelated, the first deals with the discernable features – network ties – that link actors. The cognitive dimension manifests through shared language, narratives and codes, while the latter deals especially with bonds that emerge between actors, associated with trust, trustworthiness, obligations and expectations, as well as identity and identification. Over time, and through repeated and reciprocal interactions, SC ties may strengthen, while “relational embeddedness” extends. The source of SC, the initial formation of SC, examined through values is what we endeavour to examine. [less ▲]

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See detailFunctional equation that characterize higher order derivations
Kiss, Gergely UL

Scientific Conference (2018, June)

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See detailDerivations and differential operators on rings and fields
Kiss, Gergely UL

Scientific Conference (2018, June)

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See detailIdentifying the Cognitive Mechanism Behind Breaks in Presence using Measures of Attention
Holl, Elisabeth UL; Huber, Kerstin; Liebold, Benny et al

Scientific Conference (2018, May 28)

Presence is the perceptual illusion of non-mediation in virtual environments with breaks in presence (BIPs) marking events where the user’s attention is shifted away from the virtual to the physical ... [more ▼]

Presence is the perceptual illusion of non-mediation in virtual environments with breaks in presence (BIPs) marking events where the user’s attention is shifted away from the virtual to the physical environment. Using the concept of BIP allows to investigate specific episodes during virtual encounters, where the state of presence is interrupted. Orienting responses have been identified as a promising cognitive mechanism behind BIPs. However, the differences of orienting to narrative stimuli versus BIPs remains to be investigated. In the current study, we combined established psychophysiological measures of orienting (ECG, GSR) with psychophysiological (pupil dilation) and behavioral measures (STRT) of attention. BIPs are considered to elicit stronger orienting responses and require more cognitive resources. In an experiment, participants navigated through a virtual environment while having to react to narrative and external (BIPs) stimuli. While the data collection has been completed, results from the analysis will be discussed at the conference. [less ▲]

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See detailSmartCheck: Static Analysis of Ethereum Smart Contracts
Tikhomirov, Sergei UL; Voskresenskaya, Ekaterina; Ivanitskiy, Ivan et al

Scientific Conference (2018, May 27)

Ethereum is a major blockchain-based platform for smart contracts – Turing complete programs that are executed in a decentralized network and usually manipulate digital units of value. Solidity is the ... [more ▼]

Ethereum is a major blockchain-based platform for smart contracts – Turing complete programs that are executed in a decentralized network and usually manipulate digital units of value. Solidity is the most mature high-level smart contract language. Ethereum is a hostile execution environment, where anonymous attackers exploit bugs for immediate financial gain. Developers have a very limited ability to patch deployed contracts. Hackers steal up to tens of millions of dollars from flawed contracts, a well-known example being “The DAO“, broken in June 2016. Advice on secure Ethereum programming practices is spread out across blogs, papers, and tutorials. Many sources are outdated due to a rapid pace of development in this field. Automated vulnerability detection tools, which help detect potentially problematic language constructs, are still underdeveloped in this area. We provide a comprehensive classification of code issues in Solidity and implement SmartCheck – an extensible static analysis tool that detects them. SmartCheck translates Solidity source code into an XML-based intermediate representation and checks it against XPath patterns. We evaluated our tool on a big dataset of real-world contracts and compared the results with manual audit on three contracts. Our tool reflects the current state of knowledge on Solidity vulnerabilities and shows significant improvements over alternatives. SmartCheck has its limitations, as detection of some bugs requires more sophisticated techniques such as taint analysis or even manual audit. We believe though that a static analyzer should be an essential part of contract developers’ toolbox, letting them fix simple bugs fast and allocate more effort to complex issues. [less ▲]

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See detailPrivacy-preserving KYC on Ethereum
Biryukov, Alex UL; Khovratovich, Dmitry; Tikhomirov, Sergei UL

Scientific Conference (2018, May 09)

Identity is a fundamental concept for the financial industry. In order to comply with regulation, financial institutions must verify the identity of their customers. Identities are currently handled in a ... [more ▼]

Identity is a fundamental concept for the financial industry. In order to comply with regulation, financial institutions must verify the identity of their customers. Identities are currently handled in a centralized way, which diminishes users' control over their personal information and threats their privacy. Blockchain systems, especially those with support for smart contracts (e.g.,~Ethereum), are expected to serve as a basis of more decentralized systems for digital identity management. We propose a design of a privacy-preserving KYC scheme on top of Ethereum. It would let providers of financial services leverage the potential of blockchain technology to increase efficiency of customer onboarding while complying with regulation and protecting users' privacy. [less ▲]

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See detailMusic as Education in History
Sagrillo, Damien UL

Scientific Conference (2018, May 03)

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See detailDark Souls like "Dark Souls": Personality Characteristics and Preference for Violent Video Games
Melzer, André UL; Engelberg, Elisabeth

Scientific Conference (2018, May)

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See detailTeachers make the difference! Gender specific predictors of bullying and cyberbullying
Steffgen, Georges UL; Heinz, Andreas UL

Scientific Conference (2018, April 26)

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See detailBilderbücher als Medium zum Valorisieren der Familiensprachen im Précoce
Andersen, Katja Natalie UL; Reuland, Claudine; Rios-Ney, Jessica

Scientific Conference (2018, April 26)

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See detailUnderstanding Anomaly Decay
Penasse, Julien UL

Scientific Conference (2018, April 24)

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See detailThe Function of Autobiographies in the Construction of a Trans Narrative
Artuso, Sandy Kathy UL

Scientific Conference (2018, April 19)

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See detailJoint Wireless Information and Energy Transfer in Cache-assisted Relaying Systems
Gautam, Sumit UL; Vu, Thang Xuan UL; Chatzinotas, Symeon UL et al

Scientific Conference (2018, April 16)

We investigate the performance of time switching (TS) based energy harvesting model for cache-assisted simultaneous wireless transmission of information and energy (Wi-TIE). In the considered system, a ... [more ▼]

We investigate the performance of time switching (TS) based energy harvesting model for cache-assisted simultaneous wireless transmission of information and energy (Wi-TIE). In the considered system, a relay which is equipped with both caching and energy harvesting capabilities helps a source to convey information to a destination. First, we formulate based on the time-switching architecture an optimization problem to maximize the harvested energy, taking into consideration the cache capability and user quality of service requirement. We then solve the formulated problem to obtain closed-form solutions. Finally, we demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed system via numerical results. [less ▲]

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See detailCache-Aided Millimeter Wave Ad-Hoc Networks
Vuppala, Satyanarayana UL; Vu, Thang Xuan UL; Gautam, Sumit UL et al

Scientific Conference (2018, April 16)

In this paper, we investigate the performance of cache enabled millimeter wave (mmWave) ad-hoc network, where randomly distributed nodes are supported by a cache memory. Specifically, we study the optimal ... [more ▼]

In this paper, we investigate the performance of cache enabled millimeter wave (mmWave) ad-hoc network, where randomly distributed nodes are supported by a cache memory. Specifically, we study the optimal caching placement at the desirable mmWave node using a network model that accounts for the uncertainties in node locations and blockages. We then characterize the average success probability of content delivery. As a desirable side effect, certain factors like the density of nodes and increased antenna gain, can significantly increase the cache hit ratio in mmWave networks. However, a trade-off between the cache hit probability and the average successful content delivery probability with respect to the density of nodes is presented. [less ▲]

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See detailBelgien in Deutschland oder Belgier in Deutschland? Die Zeit der Präsenzpolitik (1945-1955)
Brüll, Christoph UL

Scientific Conference (2018, April 12)

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See detailThe Impact of Feedback Trading on Option Prices
Lehnert, Thorsten UL

Scientific Conference (2018, April 05)

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See detailAn overview. Collaborative problem solving in large-scale assessments
Greiff, Samuel UL; Niepel, Christoph UL; Mustafic, Maida UL

Scientific Conference (2018, April)

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See detailUsing process data to explain group differences in complex problem solving
Eichmann, B.; Pucite, L.; Naumann, J. et al

Scientific Conference (2018, April)

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See detailUser Rewarding and Distributed Payment Platforms for Mobile Crowdsensing Systems
Capponi, Andrea UL

Scientific Conference (2018, April)

Mobile Crowdsensing (MCS) has become in the last years one of the most prominent paradigms for urban sensing. In MCS systems, citizens actively participate in the sensing process by contributing data from ... [more ▼]

Mobile Crowdsensing (MCS) has become in the last years one of the most prominent paradigms for urban sensing. In MCS systems, citizens actively participate in the sensing process by contributing data from their mobile devices. To make e ective a MCS campaign, large participation is fundamental. Users sustain costs to contribute data and they may be reluctant in joining the sensing process. Hence, it is essential to incentivize participants. Several incentive mechanisms have been investigated, such as monetary rewarding. In this context, distributed payment platforms based on custom built blockchains assume a fundamental role. We aim to develop a platform to distribute micro-payments following rewarding schemes. The key idea is to di erentiate between users through several parameters, such as the amount of acquired data and the Quality of Information (QoI), according to the particular campaign and the need of the organizers. [less ▲]

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See detailBarriers and facilitators for the use of assistive technologies for activities of daily living
Abrilahij, Afsaneh UL; Boll, Thomas UL

Scientific Conference (2018, April)

Many older people have functional impairments which increase their risk of losing the ability to live autonomously and to become dependent on care by others. However, assistive technologies (ATs) can help ... [more ▼]

Many older people have functional impairments which increase their risk of losing the ability to live autonomously and to become dependent on care by others. However, assistive technologies (ATs) can help to overcome some limitations of activities of daily living and can thus be assumed to prevent, delay or reduce the need for personal long-term care as well as the burden on caring family members (e.g., spouses, adult children). Yet, the use rate of ATs is still rather low. This paper reviews positive effects of ATs and factors that influence their use. We performed systematic literature searches in PsycINFO, MEDLINE, and Google scholar databases. We found convergent results that the use of ATs for several kinds of activities of daily living such as self-care and mobility was associated with a reduced amount of self-reported personal (in particular informal) care hours. Regarding factors of ATs use, we found that feeling loneliness, cognitive impairments, and difficulty of use were some of barriers for the use of ATs. There is converging evidence that indicators of situation of need (in particular: disabilities in preforming self-care activities) are associated with an increased use of ATs. Slight to moderate functional limitations, chronic illnesses, and home-based training were some of the facilitators for the use of ATs. We concluded with recommendations for further improvement of studies relevant to ATs use. [less ▲]

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See detailPathologies of Empathy: Kant, Polidori, Hoffmann
Kohns, Oliver UL

Scientific Conference (2018, April)

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See detailUnlocking the Potential of Educationally Diverse Founding Teams for Firm Growth: The Moderating Role of New Venture Activities
Tryba, Anne UL; Patzelt, Holger; Breugst, Nicola

Scientific Conference (2018, April)

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See detailInteractive effects of comprehension and problem solving skills on digital reading performance and navigation
Naumann, J.; Pucite, L.; Eichmann, B. et al

Scientific Conference (2018, April)

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See detailYale Symposium on Art and Gender
Penasse, Julien UL

Scientific Conference (2018, March 29)

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See detailWalks in Luxembourg: researching forced migrants’ multilingual language practices
Kalocsanyiova, Erika UL

Scientific Conference (2018, March 28)

Luxembourg has a long-standing tradition of multilingualism: according to the 1984 language law, Luxembourgish, German and French are all acknowledged as languages of administration. This rich linguistic ... [more ▼]

Luxembourg has a long-standing tradition of multilingualism: according to the 1984 language law, Luxembourgish, German and French are all acknowledged as languages of administration. This rich linguistic environment is further complexified by the languages and language varieties of the large international community – composed of 160 different nationalities – that resides in Luxembourg City. Hence, other languages such as English, Portuguese or Italian might be equally important for navigating local life. Most members of the local society move fluidly back and forth between a multitude of languages, often within a single speech event. Luxembourg’s multilingualism is not territory-based; it is reflected in different patterns of language use that are intertwined with competing social positions and collective identities (Horner, 2015). This contribution presents data from an ongoing doctoral research project that follows the language learning trajectory of five asylum applicants in Luxembourg. The project follows a linguistic ethnographic approach (Copland & Creese, 2015), which is well suited to reveal the participants’ attitudes towards different languages, practices and (linguistic) identities. Based on participant observation, interviewing and go-alongs (Kusenbach, 2003), the present contribution examines how research participants draw on their linguistic resources as they move across different sites in their daily trajectories. Their language practices are analysed as in situ responses to specific situations/settings in Luxembourg’s multilingual environment. Our findings suggest that in their daily interactions, the research participants use both their old and newly-acquired language resources, without too much regard to the boundaries between them. This confirms the asylum applicants’ positive attitude towards Luxembourg’s languages and their wish to incorporate a wide range of local resources into their communicative repertoires (Kalocsányiová, 2017). By the same token, the participants’ multilingual practices are indicative of new complex forms of linguistic identification. [less ▲]

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See detailContested Autonomies: French University Governance and its Discontents
Harmsen, Robert UL

Scientific Conference (2018, March 28)

In the past decade, the governance of French universities has seen substantial changes in line with developments elsewhere in Europe. Engaging in an ‘autonomy/accountability two-step’, French universities ... [more ▼]

In the past decade, the governance of French universities has seen substantial changes in line with developments elsewhere in Europe. Engaging in an ‘autonomy/accountability two-step’, French universities have been granted a significantly higher degree of organisational autonomy while at the same time becoming subject to a widening set of external accountability measures. The French case nonetheless presents interesting specificities stemming particularly from the absence of a strong tradition of institutional-level university autonomy. The present paper explores current reforms against the background of this distinctive historical tradition, probing the mediation of ‘global scripts’ by ‘national filters’. After setting out the broad contours of the historical model, successive sections then survey the 2007 Law on the Liberty and Responsibility of Universities, the 2013 Fioraso Law, and the possible direction of policy under the Macron presidency. The concluding section situates French developments relative to wider trends in terms suggestive of a forward research agenda. [less ▲]

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See detailForced Migration, Borders and Multilingualism: The Ideological Grounds of Linguistic Integration in Luxembourg
Kalocsanyiova, Erika UL

Scientific Conference (2018, March 27)

The purpose of this contribution is to identify the complexities that surround the linguistic integration of forced migrants in multilingual societies. We present data from an ongoing doctoral research ... [more ▼]

The purpose of this contribution is to identify the complexities that surround the linguistic integration of forced migrants in multilingual societies. We present data from an ongoing doctoral research project that follows the trajectory of five refugees who fleeing war and political unrest in the Middle East, sought international protection in Luxembourg. Large proportion of Luxembourg’s workforce originates or lives outside of the boundaries of the nation state (Statec, 2016). The notion of a homogenous speech community – be it formulated in terms of a monolingual identification with the Luxembourgish language, or as a trilingual identification with the three languages (Luxembourgish, French and German) recognized by the language law of 1984 (Horner, 2015) – is continuously under pressure. The erosion of traditional linguistic boundaries is reinforced by the strong presence of English, Portuguese, Italian and dozens of other migrant languages, including the multiple language resources forced migrants bring to this context. This creates new forms of linguistic intersection, where the negotiation of differences can lead to either the reinforcement of existing barriers, or the embracement of the multilingual affordances created by this new emerging context (Kalocsányiová, 2016 & 2017). In multilingual societies, the successful navigation of local life requires the development of different capabilities in a variety of languages and for a range of purposes. According to the research participants’ accounts, their language learning trajectory in Luxembourg has been substantially influenced by the uncertainty of their situation. Forced migrants “dwell on the borders” while awaiting a decision on their asylum claims and beyond, which has clear implications for their language choices and the language learning options available to them. The project follows a linguistic ethnographic approach (Copland & Creese, 2015): based on interviewing, participant observations and go-alongs, we examine a broad range of competing ideologies that forced migrants are required to balance in their daily efforts to integrate. [less ▲]

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See detailXDMF and ParaView: checkpointing format
Habera, Michal UL; Zilian, Andreas UL; Hale, Jack UL et al

Scientific Conference (2018, March 21)

Checkpointing, i.e. saving and reading results of finite element computation is crucial, especially for long-time running simulations where execution is interrupted and user would like to restart the ... [more ▼]

Checkpointing, i.e. saving and reading results of finite element computation is crucial, especially for long-time running simulations where execution is interrupted and user would like to restart the process from last saved time step. On the other hand, visualization of results in thid-party software such as ParaView is inevitable. In the previous DOLFIN versions (2017.1.0 and older) these two functionalities were strictly separated. Results could have been saved via HDF5File interface for later computations and/or stored in a format understood by ParaView - VTK’s .pvd (File interface) or XDMF (XDMFFile interface). This led to data redundancy and error-prone workflow. The problem essentially originated from incompatibilities between both libraries, DOLFIN and ParaView (VTK). DOLFIN’s internal representation of finite element function is based on vector of values of degrees of freedom (dofs) and their ordering within cells (dofmap). VTK’s representation of a function is given by it’s values at some points in cell, while ordering and geometric position of these points is fixed and standardised within VTK specification. For nodal (iso- and super-parametric) Lagrange finite elements (Pk , dPk ) both representations coincide up to an ordering. This allows to extend XDMF specification and introduce intermediate way of storing finite element function - intrinsic to both, ParaView and DOLFIN. The necessary work was done as a part of Google Summer of Code 2017 project Develop XDMF for- mat for visualisation and checkpointing, see https://github.com/michalhabera/gsoc-summary. New checkpointing functionality is exposed via write checkpoint() and read checkpoint() methods. [less ▲]

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See detailLa communauté de pratique pilotée comme vecteur d’innovation organisationnelle en contexte d’établissement public
Obringer, Lisa; Benedic, Michael; Geraudel, Mickaël UL

Scientific Conference (2018, March 21)

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See detailYouth Mobility – experiencing (un)certainties
Kmiotek, Emilia Alicja UL; Vysotskaya, Volha UL

Scientific Conference (2018, March 19)

Detailed reference viewed: 18 (2 UL)