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See detailSupporting Security Protocols on CAN-Based Networks
Bloom, Gedare; Cena, Gianlua; Cibrario Bertolotti, Ivan et al

Scientific Conference (in press)

The ever-increasing variety of services built on top of the Controller Area Network (CAN), along with the recent discovery of vulnerabilities in CAN-based automotive systems (some of them demonstrated in ... [more ▼]

The ever-increasing variety of services built on top of the Controller Area Network (CAN), along with the recent discovery of vulnerabilities in CAN-based automotive systems (some of them demonstrated in practice) stimulated a renewed attention to security-oriented enhancements of the CAN protocol. The issue is further compounded nowadays because, unlike in the past, security can no longer be enforced by physical bus segregation. This paper describes how CAN XR, a recently proposed extension of the CAN data-link layer, can effectively support the distributed calculation of arbitrary binary Boolean functions, which are the foundation of most security protocols, without necessarily disclosing their operands on the bus. The feasibility of the approach is then shown through experimental evaluation and by confirming its applicability to a shared key generation protocol proposed in literature. [less ▲]

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See detailÉvaluations numériques: quel rôle pour l’expérience utilisateur ?
Pere, Maxime UL; Lallemand, Carine UL; Koenig, Vincent UL

Scientific Conference (2018, January)

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See detailThe Missing Risk Premium in Exchange Rates
Penasse, Julien UL

Scientific Conference (2017, December 15)

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See detailOntologically stepping-up: A model for refugee entrepreneurship
Heilbrunn, Sibylle; Iannone, Rosa Lisa UL

Scientific Conference (2017, December 01)

This paper is a first attempt at proposing an integrated conceptual model that would bridge this gap in our knowledge of refugee entrepreneurship. Such a model might then enable for the understanding of ... [more ▼]

This paper is a first attempt at proposing an integrated conceptual model that would bridge this gap in our knowledge of refugee entrepreneurship. Such a model might then enable for the understanding of the super-diverse entrepreneurial strategies being employed by super-diverse refugees, within complex and super-diverse socio-economic and political settings – thereby, ontologically stepping-up our theoretical approaches and empirical insights into the phenomenon. [less ▲]

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See detailValue-Added Modelling in Primary and Secondary School: An Integrative Review of 674 Publications
Levy, Jessica UL; Keller, Ulrich UL; Brunner, Martin et al

Scientific Conference (2017, December)

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See detailThe Time-Varying Risk of Macroeconomic Disasters
Penasse, Julien UL

Scientific Conference (2017, December)

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See detailConfronting corpora with coursebooks: the case of lecture listening
Deroey, Katrien UL

Scientific Conference (2017, November 23)

This paper confronts language use in the British Academic Spoken English (BASE) corpus with the representation of lectures in 25 listening coursebooks (Deroey, submitted; Deroey, 2017). Following key ... [more ▼]

This paper confronts language use in the British Academic Spoken English (BASE) corpus with the representation of lectures in 25 listening coursebooks (Deroey, submitted; Deroey, 2017). Following key tenets such as authenticity, specificity and needs analysis, English for Academic Purposes (EAP) materials development should be guided by an understanding of target genres and their communicative demands. Yet, lecture listening coursebooks have often been criticised for their lack of realistic lecture models (e.g. Alexander, Argent, & Spencer, 2008; Field, 2011; Thompson, 2003). The aspects of representativeness examined in these coursebooks are language, lecture authenticity and research-informedness. To assess the representativeness of language, signposts of important points are compared with those retrieved from the BASE corpus of 160 authentic lectures (Deroey, submitted; Deroey and Taverniers, 2012). The coursebook lectures are also analysed in terms of their source, delivery and length. The materials are further reviewed for their use of findings from research into listening comprehension and lecture discourse. Results suggest that current lecture listening materials often do not reflect the language and lectures students are likely to encounter on their degree programmes. Moreover, materials are typically not (systematically) informed by listening and lecture discourse research. These findings highlight the need for EAP practitioners to approach published materials critically and supplement or modify them in ways that would better serve students. References Alexander, O., Argent, S., & Spencer, J. (2008). EAP Essentials: a teacher’s guide to principles and practice. Reading: Garnet. Deroey, K. L. B. (submitted). The representativeness of lecture listening coursebooks: language, lectures, research-informedness. Deroey, K. L. B. (2017). How representative are EAP listening books of real lectures? . In J. Kemp (Ed.), Proceedings of the 2015 BALEAP Conference. EAP in a rapidly changing landscape: Issues, challenges and solutions. Reading: Garnet. Deroey, K. L. B., & Taverniers, M. (2012). Just remember this: Lexicogrammatical relevance markers in lectures. English for Specific Purposes, 31(4), 221-233.  Field, J. (2011). Into the mind of the academic listener. Journal of English for Academic Purposes, 10(2), 102-112.  Thompson, S. E. (2003). Text-structuring metadiscourse, intonation and the signalling of organisation in academic lectures. Journal of English for Academic Purposes, 2(1), 5-20.  [less ▲]

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See detailMarkers of lesser importance in lecture discourse
Deroey, Katrien UL

Scientific Conference (2017, November 22)

This paper surveys how less important lecture discourse is marked lexicogrammatically in the British Academic Spoken English (BASE) corpus (Deroey and Taverniers, 2012; Deroey, 2014). Such interpersonal ... [more ▼]

This paper surveys how less important lecture discourse is marked lexicogrammatically in the British Academic Spoken English (BASE) corpus (Deroey and Taverniers, 2012; Deroey, 2014). Such interpersonal, metadiscursive devices combine discourse organization with evaluation along a ‘parameter of importance or relevance’ (Thompson and Hunston, 2000: 24). They can help students discern the relative importance of points and so may aid lecture comprehension, note-taking and retention. The markers were first retrieved manually from 40 lectures and then using Sketch Engine from all 160 lectures. They fell into five categories: (i) message status markers (e.g. not pertinent, joke, anyway); (ii) topic treatment markers (e.g. briefly, not look at, for a moment); (iii) lecturer knowledge markers (e.g. not know, not remember); (iv) assessment markers (e.g. not examine, not learn); and (v) attention- and note-taking markers (e.g. ignore, not copy down). This study illustrates the challenge of identifying and quantifying pragmatic features in academic discourse. Few markers explicitly evaluated discourse as being unimportant (e.g. not pertinent) and few had an inherent meaning of lesser importance (e.g. incidentally). Instead, they depended rather heavily on pragmatic interpretation to achieve their effect and could generally be viewed as ‘muted signals’ (Swales and Burke, 2003: 17), expressing importance implicitly or cumulatively (cf. Hunston, 2011). Hence, Hunston’s observation that ‘much evaluative meaning is not obviously identifiable, as it appears to depend on immediate context and on reader assumptions about value’ (2004: 157) is particularly pertinent here. References Deroey, K. L. B. (2014). ‘Anyway, the point I'm making is’: Lexicogrammatical relevance marking in lectures. In L. Vandelanotte, D. Kristin, G. Caroline, & K. Ditte (Eds.), Recent Advances in Corpus Linguistics: Developing and Exploiting Corpora (pp. 265-291). Amsterdam/New York: Rodopi. Deroey, K. L. B., & Taverniers, M. (2012). ‘Ignore that' cause it's totally irrelevant’: Marking lesser relevance in lectures. Journal of Pragmatics, 44(14), 2085-2099. Hunston, S. (2004). Counting the uncountable: Problems of identifying evaluation in a text and in a corpus. In A. Partington, J. Morley, & L. Haarman (Eds.), Corpora and discourse (pp. 157-188). Bern: Peter Lang. Hunston, S. (2011). Corpus approaches to evaluation: phraseology and evaluative language (Vol. 13). New York: Routledge. Swales, J. M., & Burke, A. (2003). " Its really fascinating work": Differences in Evaluative Adjectives across Academic Registers. Language and Computers, 46(1), 1-18.  Thompson, G., & Hunston, S. (2000). Evaluation: An introduction. In Hunston, S., & Thompson, G. (Eds.), Evaluation in text: Authorial stance and the construction of discourse (pp. 1-27). Oxford: OUP. [less ▲]

See detailKonventionen und Tabus? Deutschlandbilder in Lüttich im langen 19. Jahrhundert
Brüll, Christoph UL

Scientific Conference (2017, November 22)

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See detailDemystifying multilingualism at work, at home and at school
Kirsch, Claudine UL

Scientific Conference (2017, November 21)

What is multilingualism? How has our understanding of multilingualism, language learning and developing several languages in children at home and at school changed over the last century? Building on the ... [more ▼]

What is multilingualism? How has our understanding of multilingualism, language learning and developing several languages in children at home and at school changed over the last century? Building on the work of several leading scholars such as García, Creese and Blackledge, Li Wei, and Baker as well as on my own research, this interactive presentation will deconstruct traditional understandings of multilingualism and show that translanguaging, the use of one’s entire semiotic repertoire for communication, meaning-making and learning, is a normal practice. In addition, we will examine approaches such as “one-person-one-language” and “one-person-two-languages” and discuss some video excerpts illustrating how children use their multilingual repertoire in a crèche at and school. [less ▲]

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See detailEU citizens’ rights versus the Member States’ right to withdraw from the Union
Gerkrath, Jörg UL

Scientific Conference (2017, November 18)

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See detailConclusions
Pettiau, Hérold UL; Lemesle, Bruno; Lemaître, Nicole

Scientific Conference (2017, November 17)

This intervention consiste of concluding remarks of a conférence on the office of bishops as administrations of their diocèse within a region encompassing the Low Countries, dthe Duchy of Lorraine, the ... [more ▼]

This intervention consiste of concluding remarks of a conférence on the office of bishops as administrations of their diocèse within a region encompassing the Low Countries, dthe Duchy of Lorraine, the Alsace region, Switzelrand, south-Esastern France and the North of Italy, which were allegedly part of a sort of "catholic front" facing the Reformation. [less ▲]

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See detailAssociative and quasitrivial operations on finite sets (invited lecture)
Marichal, Jean-Luc UL; Couceiro, Miguel; Devillet, Jimmy UL

Scientific Conference (2017, November 10)

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See detailThe Missing Risk Premium in Exchange Rates
Penasse, Julien UL

Scientific Conference (2017, November 08)

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See detailThe Effects of Deskilling and Unemployment on Hiring Decisions
Samuel, Robin UL; Imdorf, Christian; Sacchi, Stefan et al

Scientific Conference (2017, November 08)

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See detailAdvanced Interest Flooding Attacks in Named-Data Networking
Signorello, Salvatore UL; Marchal, Samuel; François, Jérôme et al

Scientific Conference (2017, October 30)

The Named-Data Networking (NDN) has emerged as a clean-slate Internet proposal on the wave of Information-Centric Networking. Although the NDN’s data-plane seems to offer many advantages, e.g., native ... [more ▼]

The Named-Data Networking (NDN) has emerged as a clean-slate Internet proposal on the wave of Information-Centric Networking. Although the NDN’s data-plane seems to offer many advantages, e.g., native support for multicast communications and flow balance, it also makes the network infrastructure vulnerable to a specific DDoS attack, the Interest Flooding Attack (IFA). In IFAs, a botnet issuing unsatisfiable content requests can be set up effortlessly to exhaust routers’ resources and cause a severe performance drop to legitimate users. So far several countermeasures have addressed this security threat, however, their efficacy was proved by means of simplistic assumptions on the attack model. Therefore, we propose a more complete attack model and design an advanced IFA. We show the efficiency of our novel attack scheme by extensively assessing some of the state-of-the-art countermeasures. Further, we release the software to perform this attack as open source tool to help design future more robust defense mechanisms. [less ▲]

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See detailEthereum: state of knowledge and research perspectives
Tikhomirov, Sergei UL

Scientific Conference (2017, October 24)

Ethereum is a decentralized application platform that allows users to write, deploy, and interact with smart contracts -- programs that encode financial agreements. A peer-to-peer network of mutually ... [more ▼]

Ethereum is a decentralized application platform that allows users to write, deploy, and interact with smart contracts -- programs that encode financial agreements. A peer-to-peer network of mutually distrusting nodes maintains a common view of the state of all accounts and executes smart contracts' code upon request. The global state is stored in a blockchain secured by a proof-of-work consensus mechanism similar to that in Bitcoin. The core value proposition of Ethereum is a Turing-complete programming language that enables implementing complex logic in smart contracts. Decentralized applications without a trusted third party are appealing in many areas, such as financial services, crowdfunding, and gambling. Smart contracts as a research topic contains many unsolved challenges and spans over areas ranging from cryptography, consensus algorithms, and programming languages to governance, ethical, and legal issues. This paper is the first to summarize the state of knowledge in this field. We provide a technical overview of Ethereum and outline open challenges along with proposed solutions. We also mention alternative blockchains with Turing complete programming capabilities. [less ▲]

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See detailDigital health: navigating towards meaningful and sustainable solutions
Lygidakis, Charilaos UL

Scientific Conference (2017, October 18)

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See detailUnified Satellite and Terrestrial ACM Design
Haqiqatnejad, Alireza UL; Kayhan, Farbod UL

Scientific Conference (2017, October 17)

First step towards integrating satellite and terrestrial standards at the physical layer is to design a unified packet frame structure, and in particular, a unified adaptive coding and modulation (ACM ... [more ▼]

First step towards integrating satellite and terrestrial standards at the physical layer is to design a unified packet frame structure, and in particular, a unified adaptive coding and modulation (ACM) scheme without substantial loss in either of the systems. In this paper we introduce a methodology to design such a set of modulation and coding (MODCOD) combinations. In the first step, we design a set of base MODCODs for the AWGN channel. Then, for any other given channel model, we build a new set of MODCODs through a suitable transformation of the base MODCODs. We mainly focus on two types of channels: (a) non-linear satellite channels, and (b) AWGN channels with fading. We compare our results with latest digital video broadcasting standards, namely, DVB-T2 and DVB-S2X. [less ▲]

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See detailThe dialectic of transnational integration and national disintegration as mayor challenge of the aggregation of knowledge by European Expert Groups
Decieux, Jean Philippe Pierre UL

Scientific Conference (2017, October 14)

From a phenomenological perspective on modern systems of knowledge production a transformation towards a hybrid knowledge production has taken place. Categories like locality or embeddedness have been ... [more ▼]

From a phenomenological perspective on modern systems of knowledge production a transformation towards a hybrid knowledge production has taken place. Categories like locality or embeddedness have been overcome and rise of arenas of cross-broader-cooperation can be observed. The political sector is an important example where a rise of decision-making contexts with supra national relevance can be detected. As consequence a transformation of the political advisory-system towards the genesis of multinational advisory organisations on supranational level can be observed. This means that decision-making knowledge is developed and standardized on supranational level and supposed to be applied top-down on local level. Theoretically such a cooperative form of knowledge co-production of application-driven knowledge by a heterogeneous set of stakeholders aims to produce a context specific solution for specific problems of application (“socially robust knowledge”) in order to provide evidence-based policy-making. But in fact such a processes of unification of knowledge on supranational level often reduces national policy autonomy and is associated with the risk of limited compliance to the specific local needs. Thus the universal transnational knowledge is systematically contested by a variety of particularistic relevancies as is lacks in socially robustness for the application on national decision-making level (“dialectic of transnational integration and disintegration “. This paper analyses how national policy systems are responding to global integration initiatives. By using an in-depth-case-study, I focus especially on individual actors and their responses in the light of a multiplicity of institutional relevancies and the effective social robustness of the aggregated knowledge on national level. [less ▲]

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See detail“They can communicate, BUT…” - Language learning goals of forced migrants in multilingual Luxembourg
Kalocsanyiova, Erika UL

Scientific Conference (2017, October 13)

This contribution presents data from an ongoing doctoral research project that focuses on the linguistic integration trajectory of Syrian and Iraqi refugees in Luxembourg. Drawing on interview data and ... [more ▼]

This contribution presents data from an ongoing doctoral research project that focuses on the linguistic integration trajectory of Syrian and Iraqi refugees in Luxembourg. Drawing on interview data and classroom observations we explore teachers’ and learners’ attitudes towards Luxembourg’s main languages and their beliefs about how to approach language learning in a multilingual society. Upon arrival, refugees are immediately exposed to the country’s immense linguistic diversity along with ambiguous and often competing ideologies as to what languages to learn. While French is the main vernacular language, English has been gaining importance as lingua franca of the Grand Duchy’s large international community. Government sources increasingly emphasise the role of Luxembourgish as the sole language of integration, despite its minority position in several domains. Other languages such as German or Portuguese might be equally important for navigating local life. Refugees from regions where (a regional/dialectal form of) Arabic enjoys the status of majority language, are expected to encounter difficulties in adapting to the complex language situation of Luxembourg. As a result, the research participants have shown a strong interest in developing different capabilities in a variety of languages and for a range of purposes. Our data confirms that wide-ranging learning outcomes are pursued in this context. While teachers acknowledge the importance of this aspect for setting language learning goals, system-wide, policy-declared goals still prevail in their pedagogical practice. Yet, we have observed instances of more holistic approaches that recognize the multilingual character of communication and learning, and take better account of the learners’ short- and long-term expectations. [less ▲]

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See detailMagnetic SANS as a probe to disclose internal interfaces and the spin structure of nanoparticles
Michels, Andreas UL

Scientific Conference (2017, October 11)

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See detailThe Implementation of the Cross-Border Mergers Directive in Luxembourg - A Critical Assessment
Corbisier, Isabelle UL

Scientific Conference (2017, October 07)

Many cross-border mergers do take place in Luxembourg. Most practical difficulties in implementing the new regime were solved in the first months/years following the transposal of the Cross-Border Mergers ... [more ▼]

Many cross-border mergers do take place in Luxembourg. Most practical difficulties in implementing the new regime were solved in the first months/years following the transposal of the Cross-Border Mergers directive. As a matter of fact most of the cross-border mergers taking place in Luxembourg are of a rather uncomplicated kind as they are often intra-group mergers, between companies with no or very few employees and furthermore in a vast majority of cases between a parent company and its 100% subsidiary. In the most recent practice however, the following questions/issues were raised : - the directive only addresses mergers. Other restructurings such as divisions, transfers of assets, of a branch of activity or of the universality of the company’s assets are not covered by the directive and this even though they can likewise take place across the borders and can be difficult to carry out in the absence of some harmonized regime; - a new company law reform was recently adopted in Luxembourg, introducing, a.o., a new article 1865bis in the Civil Code that allows “dissolution-confusion” in one-shareholder companies. The question can be raised whether this provision could be applied across the borders (f.e. could a French company being the sole shareholder of a Luxembourg company decide to dissolve it without having to consider the provisions of the Cross-Border Mergers Directive ?); - another provision of the recently adopted company law reform does re-balance things when considering the cross-border merger as a means for the company to change “nationality” (or law applicable thereto). In the past companies were eventually forced to use the detour of the CBM in order to avoid the requirement of unanimity imposed by law for the transfer of the seat. Since aforementioned reform unanimity is no longer required for the cross-border transfer of the seat. The usefulness of the Cross-Border Merger Directive is therefore not in the least questioned in Luxembourg but it is regrettable that this would appear part of a “work-in-progress” that however does not show concrete signs of being completed any time soon. [less ▲]

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See detailCreditor Protection in Private Companies - the Luxembourg Experience
Corbisier, Isabelle UL

Scientific Conference (2017, October 06)

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See detailItaliani fuggitivi o semplici “gondolieri” dello spazio?
Cicotti, Claudio UL

Scientific Conference (2017, October 06)

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See detailGrenzüberschreitende Berufsausbildung als Prozess grenzüberschreitenden Lernens
Funk, Ines; Nienaber, Birte UL; Dörrenbächer, H. Peter

Scientific Conference (2017, October 03)

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See detailCharacterizing Driving Environments Through Bluetooth Discovery
Bronzi, Walter UL; Faye, Sébastien UL; Frank, Raphaël UL et al

Scientific Conference (2017, October)

Within the world of wireless technologies, Bluetooth has recently been at the forefront of innovation. It is becoming increasingly relevant for vehicles to become aware of their surroundings. Therefore ... [more ▼]

Within the world of wireless technologies, Bluetooth has recently been at the forefront of innovation. It is becoming increasingly relevant for vehicles to become aware of their surroundings. Therefore, having knowledge of nearby Bluetooth devices, both inside and outside other vehicles, can provide the listening vehicles with enough data to learn about their environment. In this paper, we collect and analyze a dataset of Bluetooth Classic (BC) and Low Energy (BLE) discoveries. We evaluate their respective characteristics and ability to provide context-aware information from a vehicular perspective. By taking a look at data about the encountered devices, such as GPS location, quantity, quality of signal and device class information, we infer distinctive behaviors between BC and BLE relative to context and application. For this purpose, we propose a set a features to train a classifier for the recognition of different driving environments (i.e. road classes) from Bluetooth discovery data alone. Comparing the performance of our classifier with different sampling parameters, the presented results indicate that, with our feature selection, we are able to predict with reasonable confidence up to three classes (Highway, City, Extra-Urban) by using only discovery data and no geographical information. This outcome gives promising results targeted at low energy and privacy-friendly applications and can open up a wide range of research directions. [less ▲]

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See detailAssessing adaptive task assignments in a simulated classroom setting
Hörstermann, Thomas UL

Scientific Conference (2017, October)

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See detailImaginationen der Macht: Über ästhetischen Autoritarismus
Kohns, Oliver UL

Scientific Conference (2017, October)

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See detailGesellschaftlicher Wandel als Re-Formierung sozialer Praxis: Analytische Zugänge
Wille, Christian UL

Scientific Conference (2017, October)

In Abgrenzung zu herkömmlichen Beschreibungen von gesellschaftlichen Verhältnissen entwerfen Praxistheorien eine Vision von Sozietät, die performativ angelegt ist, Materialität und Körperlichkeit betont ... [more ▼]

In Abgrenzung zu herkömmlichen Beschreibungen von gesellschaftlichen Verhältnissen entwerfen Praxistheorien eine Vision von Sozietät, die performativ angelegt ist, Materialität und Körperlichkeit betont und Formen des Wandels integriert. Allerdings geben die Praxistheorien (zunächst) keine modellhaften Erklärungen für gesellschaftliche Verhältnisse oder verweisen (offenkundig) auf Stellschrauben für die Steuerung des Sozialen. Im Sinne einer dynamischen Heuristik bieten sie vielmehr vielfältige und miteinander verknüpfte Beschreibungs- und Analysekategorien, treffen Aussagen über (angenommene) Zusammenhänge und versuchen die Heterogenität und Widersprüchlichkeit des Sozialen als Vollzugswirklichkeiten zu greifen. Der Vortrag setzt an dieser Stelle an und will die Chancen und Grenzen einer praxistheoretischen Reformulierung und Untersuchung von gesellschaftlichen Verhältnissen unter dem Aspekt von Wandel umreißen. Dafür wird besonders auf den flexiven Charakter von sozialen Praktiken eingegangen (In/Stabilität), das Moment der Praxislogik entwickelt (Wissen) und gefragt, inwiefern Praxistheorien eine diachrone Perspektive vorsehen (Rekonfiguration). Letztere erscheint unverzichtbar für die Thematisierung von Wandel und soll helfen praxistheoretisch orientierte Ansatzpunkte seiner Untersuchung zu identifizieren. Der Vortrag verzichtet auf empirische Beispiele, überträgt die Überlegungen allerdings auf Fragen des Forschungsprozesses. [less ▲]

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See detailMultiscale model of sintering: diffusion and plastic flow
Kabore, Brice Wendlassida UL; Peters, Bernhard UL

Scientific Conference (2017, September 27)

Impacting particles or static aggregated particles at high temperature may undergo a permanent change of shape modifying the microstructure. Two particles in contact can develop some bonds within sub ... [more ▼]

Impacting particles or static aggregated particles at high temperature may undergo a permanent change of shape modifying the microstructure. Two particles in contact can develop some bonds within sub-second time. This fast sintering force in the particular case of the snow contribute to the rheological behavior and grain rearrangement [1]. Understanding the kinetics of sintering in granular material is of great importance in some engineering applications. For decades, diffusional processes have received more attention in investigations related to the mechanisms behind sintering [2]. Some works have suggested that the plastic flow might be neglected in sintering process for stresses are not high enough to cause dislocation. However, some studies have showed that stresses experienced in fine particles necks can be high enough and even lead to plasticity driven sintering. The importance of each mechanism in the sintering process may lie in the temporal and spatial scale of interest. Increasing importance is being accorded to the role of plastic flow in sintering. however, several investigations have proved that the conventional plasticity theory may fail to predict plastic activity at micro-scale, The objective of this work is to develop adequate computational model that includes instantaneous and time-dependent plastic flow at micro-scale. We aim at extending existing models of sintering and plasticity to cope with multiple spatial and temporal scales simulations using Extended Discrete Element Method. The numerical results are compare to experimental data on snow. [less ▲]

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See detailInhalte und Ergebnisse einer Fortbildung zur Mehrsprachigkeitspädagogik in der frühen Kindheit
Kirsch, Claudine UL

Scientific Conference (2017, September 23)

Concepts and results of a continuous development course on the development of multilingual pedagogies in early childhood This presentation begins with the concepts of language development (e.g. dynamic ... [more ▼]

Concepts and results of a continuous development course on the development of multilingual pedagogies in early childhood This presentation begins with the concepts of language development (e.g. dynamic bilingualism, sociocultural theories of language learning) our professional development course on multilingual pedagogies was based on. I will then give some insights into the content of the course, show the beliefs that teachers and educators held regarding multilingualism, and show some examples of practices the latter filmed and discussed in the course. Finally, I present the results of a survey the practitioners carried our prior and after the course. The findings indicate an enhanced openness towards home languages and a weaker focus on Luxembourgish. [less ▲]

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See detailEnlarging the frame: Issues of Inclusion and mental health in an ageing society
Murdock, Elke UL; Ferring, Dieter UL

Scientific Conference (2017, September 22)

This contribution frames the notions of inclusion and mental health by describing trends in European societies at the social and economic level that will have direct consequences for a participative civil ... [more ▼]

This contribution frames the notions of inclusion and mental health by describing trends in European societies at the social and economic level that will have direct consequences for a participative civil society and social cohesion. Our starting point is the observation that the world faces challenges at the start of the 21st century that are new and unprecedented in its history. The four global forces that break all the trends known so far in human history include urbanisation, accelerating technological development, greater global connections, and population ageing (Dobbs, Manyika and Woetzel, 2016). We will first describe the scale of population ageing, as ageing populutions characterize several developed economies. In a second step, we will highlight some consequences of population ageing for social welfare and in a third part I will elaborate on the notion of justice and inclusion in rapidly changing societies. [less ▲]

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See detailThe Time-Varying Risk of Macroeconomic Disasters
Penasse, Julien UL

Scientific Conference (2017, September 15)

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See detailInfluence of laser ablation and plasma surface treatment on the joint strength of laser welded aluminum-polyamide assemblies
Al Sayyad, Adham UL; Bardon, Julien; Hirchenhahn, Pierre et al

Scientific Conference (2017, September 14)

Laser assembly of a metal with a polymer is an innovative process for the development of hybrid lightweight structures. It was already demonstrated that surface treatment of aluminum prior to laser ... [more ▼]

Laser assembly of a metal with a polymer is an innovative process for the development of hybrid lightweight structures. It was already demonstrated that surface treatment of aluminum prior to laser joining has a critical influence on joint strength of laser assembly with polyamide. In this work, further investigation of the influence of surface treatment prior to laser assembly is carried out. In particular, two kind of surface modification pretreatments of aluminum, laser ablation and plasma surface modification, in combination with plasma surface pretreatment of polyamide, were investigated. Surface properties of aluminum and polyamide after pretreatment are compared to their untreated state. More precisely, surface chemistry, surface energy and roughness characteristics are evaluated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), sessile drop tests and 3D profilometry, respectively. Joint strength of laser assembly of treated aluminum and polyamide is reported. The more influential surface characteristics for the improvement of joint strength are determined, paving the way to significant advances in metal-polymer laser assembly technology. [less ▲]

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See detailExposure to Sexualized Pictures Primes Occupational Stereotypes
Melzer, André UL; Ramsperger, Stephan

Scientific Conference (2017, September 05)

Gender stereotypes in advertisements, magazines, or videogames often appear in the form of sexualized portrayals of women characterized by inappropriately foregrounding female sexuality. Women are shown ... [more ▼]

Gender stereotypes in advertisements, magazines, or videogames often appear in the form of sexualized portrayals of women characterized by inappropriately foregrounding female sexuality. Women are shown with highly revealing clothing and engaging in seductive acts. Sexualization may serve as a motivator to adopt congruent gender-related stereotypes in the viewers and, thus, influence beliefs about women in the real world, including negative effects on self-efficacy of women (Behm-Morawitz & Mastro, 2009). In two studies, sexualization had similar adverse effects on participants’ spontaneous judgments of occupational stereotypes and job classification. In a field study (Study 1, N=128), sexualized female game characters were spontaneously associated with jobs of lower prestige (e.g., hairdresser). In contrast, non-sexualized portrayals were linked to jobs of higher status (i.e., physician, educator). This detrimental effect of sexualized portrayal on occupational status was replicated for depictions of male and female fashion models in an online survey (Study 2, N=459). Moreover, this effect was partially mediated by ratings of lower perceived competence for sexualized portrayals of both men and women. The findings of the present studies extend the multifaceted negative effects of sexualization on stereotyping by showing that the resulting spontaneous competence judgments may have detrimental job-related consequences. [less ▲]

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See detailMultiscale Modelling of Damage and Fracture in Discrete Materials Using a Variational Quasicontinuum Method
Rokos, Ondrej; Peerlings, Ron; Beex, Lars UL et al

Scientific Conference (2017, September 05)

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See detailEffects of ethnic group density on young migrants' health and health behaviour.
Kern, Matthias Robert UL; Willems, Helmut UL

Scientific Conference (2017, September 01)

Throughout the 20th century and the beginning of the current one there has been a drastic increase in ethnic diversity in many European societies. From a sociology of health perspective these developments ... [more ▼]

Throughout the 20th century and the beginning of the current one there has been a drastic increase in ethnic diversity in many European societies. From a sociology of health perspective these developments pose the question of how processes of acculturation, and with it levels of acculturative stress, often seen as responsible for many of the adverse health effects of migration, are altered if the standard assumption of an allochthonous ethnic minority acculturating to the ways of an autochthonous ethnic majority is violated. The ethnic density hypothesis suggests that an increase in own ethnic group density or overall ethnic minority density, through facilitating social support networks among co-ethnics, decreasing the rates and altering the perception of incidences of interpersonal racism and lowering the gap between acculturation and ecology can have a buffering effect on the adverse health effects of migrant status. This contribution, relying on data from the 2013-14 wave of the Luxembourgish Health Behaviour in School-Aged Children (HBSC) study, investigates the relationship between young migrants’ health and health behaviour and ethnic density in school classes. School classes, as an essential part of school-students’ immediate social environment, constitute an important acculturation context. At the same time, Luxembourg, as one of the most diverse countries in Europe, where almost two thirds of school-aged children have a migration background and only roughly 17% of first- and second-generation migrants attend classes with a native majority, presents itself as the ideal national context to explore the implications of increasing levels of ethnic diversity for migrant health and, due to its high variance in ethnic density between classes, offers enough statistical power to detect the sketched potential moderating effects. [less ▲]

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See detailFinding a job after precarious labour market experience. A cross-country factorial survey experiment with recruiters in Bulgaria, Greece, Norway and Switzerland
Imdorf, Christian; Shi, Lulu P.; Sacchi, Stefan et al

Scientific Conference (2017, September 01)

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See detailStereotypen gegenüber SchülerInnen mit Förderbedarf: Überzeugungen von erfahrenen Lehrkräften, Lehramtsstudierenden und SchülerInnen
Krischler, Mireille UL; Pit-Ten Cate, Ineke UL; Krolak-Schwerdt, Sabine UL

Scientific Conference (2017, September)

„Stereotypen“ werden als sozial geteilte Meinungen über Verhaltensweisen und Persönlichkeitsmerkmale von Mitgliedern einer bestimmten Gruppe verstanden. Stereotypen beeinflussen nicht nur unser Denken und ... [more ▼]

„Stereotypen“ werden als sozial geteilte Meinungen über Verhaltensweisen und Persönlichkeitsmerkmale von Mitgliedern einer bestimmten Gruppe verstanden. Stereotypen beeinflussen nicht nur unser Denken und Verhalten, sondern haben auch Auswirkungen darauf, wie unsere Mitmenschen über sich selber denken und sich dementsprechend verhalten (z.B. Pygmalion Effekt). Aus den stereotyp-basierten Erwartungen gegenüber SchülerInnen mit Förderbedarf können Bildungsungleichheiten und eine reduzierte soziale Partizipation resultieren. Lehrerurteile können beispielsweise von Stereotypen geprägt sein und dementsprechend Bildungswege unangemessen beeinflussen. Ebenso können Schüler, geleitet von ihren stereotyp-basierten Überzeugungen, weniger bereit sein Freundschaften mit MitschülerInnen mit Förderbedarf einzugehen. Gemäss dem „Stereotyp Content Model“ (Fiske u.a., 2002) finden Einschätzungen von Aussengruppen entlang der Dimensionen „Wärme“ und „Kompetenz“ statt. Die „Wärme“ bestimmt dabei ob eine Person als negativ oder positiv wahrgenommen wird, wobei die „Kompetenz“ die Extremität dieses Eindrucks festlegt. Stereotypen sind verbunden mit differenziellen Emotionen. So werden z.B. warme Menschen mit niedriger Kompetenz als angenehm wahrgenommen. Ziel dieser Studie war die Ermittlung ob Überzeugungen über SchülerInnen mit Förderbedarf durch Stereotypen geprägt sind und diese je nach Förderbedarf variieren. Zusätzlich wurde untersucht ob Stereotypen zwischen den verschiedenen Akteuren in der Schule variieren (z.B. abhängig von professioneller Kompetenz). Lehrkräfte, Lehramtsstudierende und Schüler (N=103) bewerteten Schüler mit Verhaltensproblemen und Lernschwierigkeiten anhand von Vignetten in den beiden Dimensionen „Wärme und „Kompetenz“. SchülerInnen sowie Lehramtsstudierende kategorisierten Schüler mit Lernschwierigkeiten und Verhaltensproblemen beide als inkompetent. Schüler mit Verhaltensproblemen wurden zusätzlich auch als relativ kalt eingeschätzt, während Schüler mit Lernschwierigkeiten eher als warm wahrgenommen wurden. Erfahrene Lehrkräfte dagegen, bewerteten die Schüler mit Lernschwierigkeiten als warm aber inkompetent und die Schüler mit Verhaltensproblemen in beiden Dimensionen neutral. Unsere Befunde sind im Einklang mit vorherigen Forschungsergebnissen die belegen, dass Stereotypen je nach Förderbedarf varieren. Da Stereotypen Urteile und Verhalten beeinflussen, deuten unsere Befunde darauf hin, dass sich die Interaktionen mit SchülerInnen mit Lernschwierigkeiten und Verhaltensproblemen voneinander unterscheiden. [less ▲]

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See detailZusammenhänge zwischen Zahlenstrahlschätzfähigkeit, Mathematikleistung und Schülercharakteristika: Eine Vollerhebung mit 6484 Luxemburgischen Neuntklässlern
Nurayadin, Sevim; Ugen, Sonja UL; Martin, Romain et al

Scientific Conference (2017, September)

In der Zahlenstrahlschätzaufgabe sehen die Probanden eine Zahl und einen leeren Zahlenstrahl, bei dem nur die erste und die letzte Position markiert und mit ihrem Wert beschriftet sind. Die Aufgabe der ... [more ▼]

In der Zahlenstrahlschätzaufgabe sehen die Probanden eine Zahl und einen leeren Zahlenstrahl, bei dem nur die erste und die letzte Position markiert und mit ihrem Wert beschriftet sind. Die Aufgabe der Probanden besteht darin, die Position der Zahl auf dem Strahl anzugeben. Der vorherrschende Ansatz in der Literatur geht davon aus, dass diese Aufgabe die Qualität der mentalen Repräsentation numerischer Größen erfasst. Diese gibt Lernen ein Verständnis von numerischen Größen und ihren Interrelationen, das eine wichtige Grundlage für den Erwerb anspruchsvollerer mathematischer Kompetenzen z.B. in Arithmetik oder Algebra darstellt. Zahlreiche Studien fanden positive Korrelationen zwischen der Zahlenstrahlschätzfähigkeit und der Mathematikleistung. Daher bietet es sich an, die Zahlenstrahlschätzaufgabe zur Diagnostik mathematischer Leistung und Entwicklung zu nutzen. Jedoch ist zum einen noch unklar, wie die Zahlstrahlschätzfähigkeit in der Population ausgeprägt und verteilt ist. Zum anderen ist offen, inwieweit die Korrelation mit der Mathematikleistung eine Scheinkorrelation darstellt, die auf den Einfluss anderer Personeneigenschaften zurückgeht. Um diese Punkte zu klären, analysierten wir Daten aus einer Vollerhebung aller Neuntklässler in Luxemburg (N = 6484). Die Schüler lösten die Zahlenstrahlschätzaufgabe mit ganzen Zahlen sowie Brüchen, absolvierten einen standardisierten Mathematikleistungstest und beantworteten zahlreiche Fragen zu domänenspezifischen (Matheängstlichkeit, Selbstkonzept, Interesse, Testmotivation) und domänenübergreifenden (Geschlecht, Immigrationsstatus, Gewissenhaftigkeit und elterlicher sozioökonomischer Status) Personenmerkmalen. Wir dokumentierten Mittelwerte und Verteilungseigenschaften der Zahlenstrahlschätzfähigkeit für diverse Subpopulationen (Jungen, Mädchen, Migranten, Schulformen etc.). Die Ergebnisse von Mehrebenenregressionsmodellen zeigten, dass die Zahlenstrahlschätzfähigkeit erheblich enger als alle anderen erhobenen Personeneigenschaften mit der Mathematikleistung zusammenhing. Der Zusammenhang war stärker für das Schätzen von Brüchen als ganzen Zahlen. Die Ergebnisse bestätigen die Annahme, dass die Zahlenstrahlschätzfähigkeit eine zentrale Komponente mathematischen Vorwissens erfasst, die weiteres Lernen leitet. In Anbetracht der einfachen Handhabung kann die Aufgabe vielfältig eingesetzt werden, um die mathematische Leistung in der Schule zu messen oder vorherzusagen. Zukünftige Studien sollten verstärkt die Nutzung der Aufgabe in Interventionen erproben. [less ▲]

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See detailThe Time-Varying Risk of Macroeconomic Disasters
Penasse, Julien UL

Scientific Conference (2017, September)

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See detailKomplexes Problemlösen und Intelligenz
Greiff, Samuel UL

Scientific Conference (2017, September)

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See detailNatural Resource Management: A Network Perspective
Kyriakopoulou, Efthymia UL; Xepapadeas, Anastasios

Scientific Conference (2017, September)

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See detailPerspectives and transition experiences of adolescents and young adults with disabilities
Weis, Daniel UL; Mousset, Isabelle

Scientific Conference (2017, September)

Aims: The focus of the presentation is the specific situation of young people with disabilities during their transition period into adulthood. Methods: The presentation is based on 51 guideline-based ... [more ▼]

Aims: The focus of the presentation is the specific situation of young people with disabilities during their transition period into adulthood. Methods: The presentation is based on 51 guideline-based qualitative interviews with adolescents and young adults with a disability. The study was conducted within the framework of the Luxembourg Youth Report 2015 (Willems, 2015). Results: The aspirations and ideas of young people with disabilities about being and becoming an adult are little different from those of their able-bodied peers. For them, too, being an adult primarily means financial, emotional and social independence and autonomy. Nevertheless, it is obvious that for them the transition to self-reliant, independent adult life is more difficult: only one in seven of those questioned had found their first job on the labour market and one in two were still living with their parents. Conclusion: Our conclusion is that for adolescents and young adults with a disability, the transition to adulthood presents a disproportionately tough challenge compared with their able-bodied peers. Sociological and psychological theories (Hurrelmann & Quenzel, 2012; Havighurst, 1972) consider the successful accomplishment of certain developmental tasks as a master challenge of youth. Young people with disabilities have to cope with the same developmental tasks as young people without disabilities. However, achieving them is much more difficult, not only because of their physical, mental or psychiatric impairment but also because of the lack of respect and the stigmatisation that they experience in daily life. [less ▲]

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See detailParallelizing XDEM: Load-balancing policies and efficiency, a study
Rousset, Alban UL; Besseron, Xavier UL; Peters, Bernhard UL

Scientific Conference (2017, September)

In XDEM, the simulation domain is geometrically decomposed in regular fixed-size cells that are used to distribute the workload between the processes. The role of the partitioning algorithm is to ... [more ▼]

In XDEM, the simulation domain is geometrically decomposed in regular fixed-size cells that are used to distribute the workload between the processes. The role of the partitioning algorithm is to distribute the cells among all the processes in order to balance the workload. To accomplish this task, the partitioning algorithm relies on a computing/communication cost that has been estimated for each cell. A proper estimation of these costs is fundamental to obtain pertinent results during this phase. The study in the work is twofold. First, we integrate five partitioning algorithms (ORB, RCB, RIB, kway and PhG) in the XDEM framework [1]. Most of these algorithms are implemented within the Zoltan library [2], a parallel framework for partitioning and ordering problems. Secondly, we propose different policies to estimate the computing cost and communication cost of the different cells composing the simulation domain. Then, we present an experimental evaluation and a performance comparison of these partitioning algorithms and cost-estimation policies on a large scale parallel execution of XDEM running on the HPC platform of the University of Luxembourg. Finally, after explaining the pros and cons of each partitioning algorithms and cost-estimation policies, we discuss on the best choices to adopt depending on the simulation case. [less ▲]

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See detailDie Trainierbarkeit von komplexem Problemlösen im Rahmen eines Trainings für Experimentieren.
Stebner, Ferdinand; Kunze, Thiemo UL; Kemper, Christoph UL et al

Scientific Conference (2017, September)

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See detailInterkulturelle Annäherung im Zeichen der Exogamie - Kommunikationsstrategien im König Rother
Bendheim, Amelie UL

Scientific Conference (2017, September)

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See detailEmployable Middle Ages - MediävistInnen auf dem Arbeitsmarkt von morgen?
Bendheim, Amelie UL

Scientific Conference (2017, September)

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See detailOrganizational learning and complex problem solving. Towards a better understanding of the modern workplace.
Jaster, Christian UL; Mainert, Jakob; Greiff, Samuel UL

Scientific Conference (2017, September)

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See detailIntroduction to Detection of Non-Technical Losses using Data Analytics
Glauner, Patrick UL; Meira, Jorge Augusto UL; State, Radu UL et al

Scientific Conference (2017, September)

Electricity losses are a frequently appearing problem in power grids. Non-technical losses (NTL) appear during distribution and include, but are not limited to, the following causes: Meter tampering in ... [more ▼]

Electricity losses are a frequently appearing problem in power grids. Non-technical losses (NTL) appear during distribution and include, but are not limited to, the following causes: Meter tampering in order to record lower consumptions, bypassing meters by rigging lines from the power source, arranged false meter readings by bribing meter readers, faulty or broken meters, un-metered supply, technical and human errors in meter readings, data processing and billing. NTLs are also reported to range up to 40% of the total electricity distributed in countries such as Brazil, India, Malaysia or Lebanon. This is an introductory level course to discuss how to predict if a customer causes a NTL. In the last years, employing data analytics methods such as data mining and machine learning have evolved as the primary direction to solve this problem. This course will compare and contrast different approaches reported in the literature. Practical case studies on real data sets will be included. Therefore, attendees will not only understand, but rather experience the challenges of NTL detection and learn how these challenges could be solved in the coming years. [less ▲]

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See detailSelektives Enkodieren in figuralen Matrizen.
Domnick, Florian UL; Becker, Nicolas; Greiff, Samuel UL et al

Scientific Conference (2017, September)

Detailed reference viewed: 15 (1 UL)
See detailHealth inequalities in Youth: Do objective and subjective family affluence matter?
Residori, Caroline UL; Willems, Helmut UL

Scientific Conference (2017, August 31)

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See detailStereotypes and attitudes towards students with special educational needs in relation to teachers´ attitudes towards inclusive education
Pit-Ten Cate, Ineke UL; Krischler, Mireille UL; Krolak-Schwerdt, Sabine UL

Scientific Conference (2017, August 30)

Decisions concerning the educational instruction and pathways of students with special educational needs (SEN) may be affected by general stereotypes and associated teachers´ attitudes. Both stereotypes ... [more ▼]

Decisions concerning the educational instruction and pathways of students with special educational needs (SEN) may be affected by general stereotypes and associated teachers´ attitudes. Both stereotypes and attitudes affect judgments and behavior and hence may be pivotal for the success of inclusive education. More specifically, stereotypes and attitudes can elicit positive or negative expectations and judgments, which in turn can enhance or limit the successful inclusion of students with SEN in regular classrooms. The current study investigated stereotypes of and teachers´ implicit attitudes toward students with SEN in relation to teachers´ explicit attitudes towards inclusive education. Results show that teachers hold ambivalent views of students with learning difficulties (i.e. low competence, high warmth), whereas students with behavioral problems are perceived as neither particularly (in)competent nor warm. These stereotypes matched teachers´ implicit attitudes to the extent that implicit attitudes towards students with learning difficulties were more negative than towards students with behavioral problems. Although teachers expressed positive attitudes towards the benefits of inclusion they reported negative attitudes in regards to their ability to teach students with SEN. No associations were found between stereotypes and implicit attitudes. Implicit attitudes towards students with SEN were also not associated with explicit attitudes towards inclusive education. The warmth dimension of stereotype was however positively correlated with perceived ability to teach students with SEN. That is, perceived ability to successfully teach these students may rely on perceptions of these students´ alleged sociability. [less ▲]

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See detailIntervention strategies to improve the quality of teachers´ judgments: Changes in the accuracy of teachers´ transition decisions
Pit-Ten Cate, Ineke UL; Krolak-Schwerdt, Sabine UL; Hörstermann, Thomas UL et al

Scientific Conference (2017, August 30)

This paper focuses on intervention modules to improve teachers’ diagnostic competence, especially in regards to decisions on students’ transition from primary to secondary education. Although these ... [more ▼]

This paper focuses on intervention modules to improve teachers’ diagnostic competence, especially in regards to decisions on students’ transition from primary to secondary education. Although these transition decisions should be based on academic achievement, research has shown non-academic variables to influence decisions, leading to disadvantages for specific groups of students. Using an experimental pre-post design, we investigated the short and long term effects of accountability, theoretical knowledge and the application of prediction rules on teachers’ judgment accuracy, respectively. Pre-intervention data showed that although teachers’ decision accuracy was of high standard, decision accuracy for ethnic majority students was significantly higher than for ethnic minority students. Increased accountability resulted in increased decision accuracy, especially in regards to decisions for ethnic minority students. Similarly, the introduction of theoretical models of decision making and judgment formation and the application of prediction rules also resulted in an improvement of transition decisions but only for ethnic minority students. Unfortunately, the differential intervention effects of the intervention modules could not be maintained over time, that is, at follow up, the ethnicity bias reappeared. From these studies we can conclude that all three intervention modules can improve the accuracy of teachers’ transition decisions. In line with the intention of the interventions, the disproportionally high rate of decision errors for ethnic minority students observed pre-intervention was eliminated post-intervention and in line with error rates for ethnic majority students. However, training or instruction should be repeated briefly before making such judgments as their influence was not maintained over time. [less ▲]

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See detailTeachers’, parents’ and students’ perspectives’ on teaching and learning Greek in a community school in Luxembourg
Kirsch, Claudine UL

Scientific Conference (2017, August 25)

Many scholars have been interested in studying patterns of language shift or maintenance of migrants during their diaspora. One way of sustaining the development of the home language is through attending ... [more ▼]

Many scholars have been interested in studying patterns of language shift or maintenance of migrants during their diaspora. One way of sustaining the development of the home language is through attending a complementary school. This paper explores the differing perspectives on teaching and learning Greek in a complementary school in Luxembourg. The participants include the two teachers of this school, the mothers of three newly migrated families and their children. Like most children of newly migrated Greek families, the children in this study attend a state schools where they learn Luxembourgish, German and French (Gogonas & Kirsch 2016). They attend the Greek school one afternoon a week for three hours. The data stem from a survey with 37 parents and interviews with the teachers, parents and children. The findings of the survey indicate that the parents expect the school to develop high competences in Greek and knowledge of Greek culture and history. The newly arrived families have higher expectations than the established ones (Frygana 2016). The thematic analysis of the interviews indicates that the teachers adhered to a monolingual policy and reinforced a sense of “Greekness” by focusing on the Greek language and teaching some elements of culture (Tsagkogeorga 2016). They were aware that the multilingual children had different school experiences depending on their language competence and friendships. The children’s experiences varied in the light of their age and the teaching approaches. While the younger children saw little purpose in attending the school, the older child could make connections between the Greek school, the state school and her life and was motivated to learn Greek. The findings of this paper encourage teachers to reflect on their language policies and teaching approaches, and encourage them to capitalize on their students’ heterogeneity. [less ▲]

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See detailDeveloping language skills in 3-year-olds in multilingual Luxembourg: a case study
Kirsch, Claudine UL; Mortini, Simone UL

Scientific Conference (2017, August 24)

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See detailSocial acceptance and peer relationships of children with physical disabilities
Pit-Ten Cate, Ineke UL; Stevenson, Jim

Scientific Conference (2017, August 24)

Following the UN Convention on the rights of people with disabilities a drive towards inclusive education can be observed. Inclusive education not only aims to reduce educational inequalities but also ... [more ▼]

Following the UN Convention on the rights of people with disabilities a drive towards inclusive education can be observed. Inclusive education not only aims to reduce educational inequalities but also promotes social participation. Although social participation partly depends on the opportunity of social interaction with peers (Kirpalani et al., 2000), other factors such as social competence and peer acceptance are important too (e.g. Schwab et al., 2013). Children with special needs are often found to be socially excluded by peers (Garrote & Dessemontet, 2015) and have fewer friends than their typically developing peers (e.g. Eriksson et al., 2007). Research has also indicated that the incidence of social maladjustment problems in children with disabilities is at least twice of that for typically developing children (Goodman & Graham, 1996; Wallander et al., 1989). Hence children with disabilities may be particularly vulnerable in regards to their peer relationships and social participation. Method: Data were collected for a clinical sample of 87 children (aged 6-18 years) with disabilities (i.e. hydrocephalus with or without spina bifida) and 57 typical developing children. Children or parents completed measures on social acceptance (the Self-Perception Profile, Harter, 1985; Harter & Pike, 1984), peer problems and prosocial behaviour (SDQ; Goodman, 1997, 1999), friendship (Berndt et al., 1986) and perceived quality of life (Graham, Stevenson, & Flynn, 1997). Results: Parent and child ratings of social acceptance and peer problems indicated children with disabilities felt less accepted and experienced more peer problems than typically developing children. No differences in prosocial behaviour were found. Although parents of children with disabilities rated the quality of life regarding friendships lower than parents of typically developing children, no differences in child ratings were found. Children with disabilities rated their friendships as less positive compared to typically developing children. Variance in the perceived quality of life could be explained by peer problems and friendship ratings but not social acceptance or peer problems. Conclusion: Friendship and peer relationships emerged as an area of specific difficulty for children with disabilities. These problems were reflected in reports of lower social acceptance, more peer problems and less positive friendship ratings. Child rated quality of life in the domain of friendship was predicted by peer problems and quality of friendship but not social acceptance. Although parents and children were generally in agreement, this study demonstrates the importance of collecting data from different sources, including the children with disabilities themselves. [less ▲]

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See detailLived Histories of Science Education in Modern Luxembourg: Interactions between Global Policies, National Curriculum and Local Practices.
Reuter, Bob UL; Schreiber, Catherina

Scientific Conference (2017, August 23)

The current paper is part of a larger research project, that seeks to gain insights into the policy and curricular reform of science education in Luxembourg’s primary schools through a state of the art ... [more ▼]

The current paper is part of a larger research project, that seeks to gain insights into the policy and curricular reform of science education in Luxembourg’s primary schools through a state of the art approach that integrates research in educational sciences (interviews and classroom observations) with research in the history of education (interviews and document analyses). Beginning with the premise that “science education” as a school discipline is the product of culturally shaped expectations, we examine the interface of international and national educational policy with local educational practice through the lens of primary school science education in Luxembourg (from 1920 through the present). This papers focuses on the historical analysis of science education and policy changes in modern Luxembourg using (1) a document-based historical analysis of curricula, textbooks and public discourses and (2) interviews with curriculum developers from the 1980s and 1990s and with key participants in science education in Luxembourg to examine the lived practices in a local context. In the synergy of the different approaches, local analysis of historically shaped notions of science education can be integrated with a transnational global perspective. Our analysis shows, among other findings, that the science education curriculum was conceived as a response to a variety of specific national educational needs (e.g. environmental protection, love of nature, scientific rational thinking, economy development, technological progress, social progress, demographic changes and challenges). But at the same time, it was covertly in line with international “scientization” policies (e.g. Drori & Meyer, 2009) building on transnational ideas such as the “spiral curriculum”. The analysed educational reform is thus a relevant example to understand culturally and historically embedded perspectives of what “science” is, and how this shapes ideals of “science education” as a discipline in school. [less ▲]

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See detailPerspectives on translanguaging and its practices in early years in Luxembourg
Kirsch, Claudine UL

Scientific Conference (2017, August 23)

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See detailSocial participation of students with special educational needs in regular classes
Pit-Ten Cate, Ineke UL; Krischler, Mireille UL

Scientific Conference (2017, August 23)

Theoretical background: Although more than twenty years have passed since the Salamanca statement (UNESCO, 1994), research still shows that children with special educational needs (SEN) are often socially ... [more ▼]

Theoretical background: Although more than twenty years have passed since the Salamanca statement (UNESCO, 1994), research still shows that children with special educational needs (SEN) are often socially excluded by peers (Garrote & Dessemontet, 2015) and have fewer friends than their typically developing peers (e.g. Eriksson, Welander, & Granlund, 2007). Following UN conventions (UN, 2006; UNESCO, 2000) there is a drive to a more inclusive society and hence inclusive education is on the political agenda of many countries. Inclusive education not only aims to reduce educational inequalities but also promotes social participation as being accepted and appreciated by typically developing peers facilitates the development of social relations and creates opportunities for participating in peer groups (Hartup, 1996). However, social participation not only depends on the opportunity of social interaction with peers but is also affected by social competence and peer acceptance (e.g. Schwab, Gebhardt, & Gasteiger-Klicpera, 2013). To this extent, children with SEN seem to have poorer social skills than their peers and experience more problems in creating and maintaining social relations (Carlson, 1987). Students with SEN are also more vulnerable of being bullied by their typically developing peers (Rose, Monda-Amaya, & Espelage, 2011). Studies comparing the social participation of groups of students having different types of SEN suggest that the risk of being less well accepted by peers is higher for students with behavioural problems than for students with learning difficulties (Avramidis, 2010; Bossaert, Colpin, Pijl, & Petry, 2013a). Social participation includes the extent of social interactions, peer acceptance, friendships as well as social self-concept (Bossaert et al., 2013a; 2013b). As merely including these students in regular classes alone cannot guarantee social participation, the question arises to what extent different person variables contribute to social inclusion or rejection. To this extent Bossaert et al (2013a) reported that not all students with SEN experience difficulties, and that especially boys with social-emotional difficulties (i.e. autistic spectrum disorders) and girls with motor and sensory difficulties were at risk. Similarly, Schwab et al (2013) concluded that social participation was associated with specific behavioural difficulties of some students with SEN. Students with learning difficulties may also be at risk as research generally has found that these students often have problems with social skills (Wight & Chapparo, 2008), which may affect their friendships and social participation. The current study therefore first aimed to investigate the social participation of primary school students with SEN (i.e bahvioural problems or learning difficulties) attending regular schools. Second, we investigated to what extent social participation was related to academic performance, behavioural problems, and prosocial behaviour. Method: Preservice teachers completed measures of social participation, behavior and academic performance for a total of 50 primary students. Students attended different primary school classes and were described as having learning difficulties, behavioural difficulties, or both. More specifically, preservice teachers completed the Perceptions of Inclusion Questionnaire (Venetz, et al., 2015), the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (Goodman, 1997) and estimated the students´ academic performance in German, French and Mathematics. The PIQ is a brief measure to assess the emotional, social and competence-based relatedness of students aged 8-16 years. The 12 items comprise 3 scales: social inclusion, emotional inclusion and academic self-concept. Each item is rated on a 4-point scale from 1 (not at all true) to 4 (certainly true). The Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire consists of 25 statements of behavior. For each statement the degree to which this behavior is typical of their child Is rated on a 3-point scale (0 = not true, 1 = somewhat true, 2 = certainly true). The scale contains four behaviour difficulty subscales (conduct problems; hyperactivity; peer problems; and emotional symptoms) and one strength category (prosocial behavior). A total behaviour score is calculated by adding the scores of the four problem domains. Academic performance was assessed by estimates of students´ academic performance in German, French and Mathematics. Preliminary Results: Frequency distributions indicate that although the social participation of students with learning difficulties and behavioural problems, nearly one third experiences problems. In addition preservice teachers reported behavioural difficulties for a large proportion of their students (34-42%). Furthermore, for 46% of the students, prosocial behavior was rated low (i.e. scores less than 5). No differences in social inclusion were found for students with behavioural or learning difficulties. However, students with behavioural problems had significantly higher SDQ scores (i.e. more behavioural problems) than students with learning difficulties Social inclusion was negatively correlated with peer problems and conduct problems, that is students with more peer or conduct problems are less socially integrated. In contrast, a positive correlation between prosocial behavior and social inclusion indicated that students displaying kindness and support towards others are more successful in participating in their social group. No relationships were found between academic performance and social participation. Conclusion: Students with SEN may have difficulties to be fully accepted in social groups, even when educated in inclusive schools, whereby especially students with conduct and peer problems may be vulnerable. Prosocial behavior however may facilitate social participation. [less ▲]

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See detailTransport Properties as a Tool to Study Universal Quench-induced Dynamics in 1D Systems
Calzona, Alessio UL; Gambetta, Filippo Maria; Carrega, Matteo et al

Scientific Conference (2017, August 07)

The study of the relaxation process that follows a quantum quench in 1D systems still represents an open research field. Here we consider a sudden change of the interparticle interaction and we identify a ... [more ▼]

The study of the relaxation process that follows a quantum quench in 1D systems still represents an open research field. Here we consider a sudden change of the interparticle interaction and we identify a peculiar correlator of the system whose behavior is directly and deeply affected by the quench-induced dynamics. Interestingly, it features a universal power-law decay in time. Unfortunately, such a universal decay, although present, turns out to be subleading in intrinsic properties of the system such as the non- equilibrium spectral function. We thus consider a tunnel coupling of the system with a biased tip in order to be able to study also transport properties, namely the charge and energy current flowing from the tip to the system after the quench. In these quantities the universal power-law emerges clearly, especially if one focuses on energy current and its fractionalization into a right- and left- moving components. In particular, we show that the presence of a transient in the energy fractionalization ratio is a direct hallmark of the quench-induced relaxation. Within the setup we have considered, time-dependent transport properties are thus promoted to useful and promising tools to access the mechanisms at the base of the out-of- equilibrium dynamics following quantum quench. [less ▲]

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See detailDignity as Discursive Enactment of Tradition: A Narrative Approach on Tradition in Family Business
Adiguna, Rocky UL

Scientific Conference (2017, August 06)

Our current understanding of tradition in organizations remain very limited. The lack of studies that take tradition as the main focus have made this concept overlooked as an important organizational ... [more ▼]

Our current understanding of tradition in organizations remain very limited. The lack of studies that take tradition as the main focus have made this concept overlooked as an important organizational feature. In this paper, I set out to address this issue by exploring how tradition is (re)produced and (re)interpreted in a century-old family-owned hotel. By adopting a narrative approach as an interpretive lens, I found that the reproduction and reinterpretation of tradition is discursively mediated through the notion of dignity. In particular, this paper argues for three forms of 'doing' dignity: first, dignity-by-category that is enacted through the discursive use of category making; second, dignity-by-sanctity that is enacted through sanctifying particular relations; and third, dignity-by-authority that is enacted through the exercise of authority to compel others to acknowledge one's dignity. To extend it further, the possibility of conceptual relations between tradition, dignity, and narrative identity is discussed. Drawing from the broader fields of social sciences, this study contributes to the scarce literature on tradition theory and dignity in organizations. [less ▲]

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See detailBubbles and Trading Frenzies: Evidence from the Art Market
Penasse, Julien UL

Scientific Conference (2017, August)

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See detailDiscussant
Greiff, Samuel UL

Scientific Conference (2017, August)

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See detailCollaborative problem solving behavior. A deep dive into log files
Schweitzer, Nick UL; Herborn, Katharina UL; Mustafic, Maida UL et al

Scientific Conference (2017, August)

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See detailThe role of international organisations in the New Math reform process
Nadimi Amiri, Shaghayegh UL

Scientific Conference (2017, August)

This paper studies a particular school reform that travelled over countries and continents. The target reform of this paper is the New Math reform, which started in the United States and travelled through ... [more ▼]

This paper studies a particular school reform that travelled over countries and continents. The target reform of this paper is the New Math reform, which started in the United States and travelled through many European countries. This article is part of my PhD project. I previously presented some of the results in different conferences, for instance: (Nadimi, 2015a, 2015b, 2016). The present paper studies the role of the international institutions in the adaptation of the reform in Luxembourg In 1958, the School Mathematics Study Group (SMSG) in the United States started a series of mathematics reform under the title “the New Math reform”. The aim of this reform plan was to promote the “problem solving” abilities in students (Phillips, 2014, pp. 16- 59). Many of mathematicians and math educators who became a member of the SMSG, had already started working on a new system of math education at the University of Chicago since 1955. However, the launch of Sputnik satellite by the USSR in 1957 gave the opportunity to trigger the New Math reform. The origin of the New Math reform was the ‘modern mathematics’ of the French Bourbaki group. A group of French mathematicians, since 1935, under the pseudonym Nicolas Bourbaki founded the “modern mathematics” by publishing the series of Elements of Mathematics (Bourbaki's_homepage). The reform came back to its land of origin through a conference organised by OEEC (Organisation for European Economic Co-operation) in the Royaumont abbey in Paris to foster the reform movement in Europe (OECD, 1961). The official title of the conference was “New thinking in mathematics education”, but it is known as the “Royaumont seminar”. OECD (the Organisation succeeding the OEEC) published the proceeding of the conference and organised other following conferences. The fact that OEEC/OECD hosts these conferences shows the politico-economic aspect of this reform. (Tröhler, 2015, p. 6) indicates that organisations like OEEC were created to link the national and the international, to create a global sphere, and to form an institutional or organisational channel to transfer desired ideas, policies, and curricula. The practical implementations of the New Math reform, in Europe, were discussed in two international organisations: ICMI (International Commission on Mathematical Instruction), founded in 1908, and CIEAEM (Commission Internationale pour l’Étude et l’Améloration de l’Enseignement des Mathématiques), established in 1950 (Vanpaemel, 2012). Furthermore, there were also local institutions, such as Centre Belge de Pédagogie de la Mathématique (CBPM). This centre had a close collaboration with Luxembourgian teachers and school stakeholders. This paper reviews the process of the New Math reform in Luxembourg by focusing on the interactions between the international institutions and the local school system. By telling the story of Luxembourg, the paper reveals a part of history related to the acts and efforts of the mentioned international organisations in the dissemination of the New Math reform idea in Europe. It shows how the national and international interactions could help the advancement of the reform and where the collaboration met challenges. The central question that shapes the paper is that up to what point the international cooperation of Luxembourgian stakeholders could be influential at the national level. This can be an example of how the acts and efforts of international organisations interact with the local interested parties in the development of an educational idea. [less ▲]

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See detailPanel participant
Greiff, Samuel UL

Scientific Conference (2017, August)

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See detailExperimental and numerical assessment of the mechanics of keloid-skin composites undergoing large deformations
Sensale, Marco UL; Chambert, Jerome; Chouly, Franz et al

Scientific Conference (2017, August)

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See detailDynamic interplay of language policy, beliefs and pedagogy in a nursery class in Luxembourg
Kirsch, Claudine UL

Scientific Conference (2017, July 24)

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See detailRefugee entrepreneurship: A systematic literature review
Heilbrunn, Sibylle; Iannone, Rosa Lisa UL

Scientific Conference (2017, July 18)

The paper presents the preliminary analyses of a systematic literature review of refugee entrepreneurship.

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See detailThe Time-Varying Risk of Macroeconomic Disasters
Penasse, Julien UL

Scientific Conference (2017, July 17)

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See detail“It is in giving that we receive, isn’t it?” – Intergenerational family solidarity, reciprocity and subjective well-being in the context of migration.
Albert, Isabelle UL; Barros Coimbra, Stephanie UL; Ferring, Dieter UL

Scientific Conference (2017, July 17)

Research on intergenerational relations has underlined the importance of reciprocity in the regulation of support exchange. The VOC study has demonstrated cross-cultural differences in reciprocity and ... [more ▼]

Research on intergenerational relations has underlined the importance of reciprocity in the regulation of support exchange. The VOC study has demonstrated cross-cultural differences in reciprocity and effects on subjective well-being. Less is known regarding migrant families as intergenerational support patterns could differ from host families due to specific needs or depending on different value orientations and family norms. Here, we focus therefore on the role of reciprocity in intergenerational family support in a sample of altogether N = 152 Luxembourgish and Portuguese (young) adults and their parents, all living in Luxembourg. In general, parents reported providing more social support for their children than they receive; but PT compared to LUX children reported providing as much social support as they receive from their parents. Results will be discussed within an integrative model on intergenerational family relations in the light of migration and ageing. [less ▲]

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