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See detailUpside down with the strong partial clones
Schölzel, Karsten UL

E-print/Working paper (2013)

Detailed reference viewed: 25 (5 UL)
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See detailUpstream Market Foreclosure
GABSZEWICZ, Jean; Zanaj, Skerdilajda UL

in Bulletin of Economic Research (2008), 60(1), 13-26

Detailed reference viewed: 32 (3 UL)
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See detailUpward social mobility and life satisfaction: the cases of United Kingdom and Switzerland
Samuel, Robin UL; Hadjar, Andreas UL

in Longitudinal and Life Course Studies (2015), 6(3), 13-14

Status is a major determinant of subjective well-being (SWB). This is one of the primary assumptions of social production function theory. In contrast, the dissociative hypothesis holds that upward social ... [more ▼]

Status is a major determinant of subjective well-being (SWB). This is one of the primary assumptions of social production function theory. In contrast, the dissociative hypothesis holds that upward social mobility may be linked to identity problems, cognitive distress, and reduced levels of SWB because of lost ties to one’s class of origin. In our paper, we use panel data from the United Kingdom (British Household Panel Survey) and Switzerland (Swiss Household Panel) to test these hypotheses. These two countries are compared because historically, social inequality and upward mobility have played distinct roles in each country’s popular discourse. We conduct longitudinal multilevel analyses to gauge the effects of intragenerational and intergenerational upward mobility on life satisfaction (as a cognitive component of SWB), controlling for previous levels of life satisfaction, dynamic class membership, and well-researched determinants of SWB such as age and health problems. Our results provide some evidence for effects of social class and social mobility on well-being in the UK sample, however, there are no such effects in the Swiss sample. The UK findings support the idea of dissociative effects, that is, intergenerational upward mobility is negatively associated with SWB. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 139 (8 UL)
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See detailUrbain-rural : dichotomie ou dialectique ?
Kmec, Sonja UL; Glesener, Jeanne UL

in Articulo : Journal of Urban Research (2010), (3), 1-2

Detailed reference viewed: 76 (3 UL)
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See detailUrban Air Makes Who Free? Immigration and Urban Citizenship in Contemporary Europe
Koff, Harlan UL

in Pauly, Michel; Lee, Alexander (Eds.) Urban liberties and citizenship from the Middle Ages up to now (2015)

Detailed reference viewed: 46 (4 UL)
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See detailUrban compactness and the trade-off between air pollution emission and exposure: Lessons from a spatially explicit theoretical model
Schindler, Mirjam UL; Caruso, Geoffrey UL

in Computers, Environment & Urban Systems (2014), 45

Air pollution is a major concern in urban areas worldwide. The interplay between urban structure and air pollution from an environmental, health and social perspective is the focus of our work: we model ... [more ▼]

Air pollution is a major concern in urban areas worldwide. The interplay between urban structure and air pollution from an environmental, health and social perspective is the focus of our work: we model how urban structure impacts traffic-induced pollutant emissions and the exposure of residents to those pollutants. We present a chain of models applied to theoretical monocentric space: a residential choice model with endogenous open-space and road network, a commuting traffic generation and road assignment model and a pollutant emissions, dispersion and exposure model. The theoretical study approach decouples results from location specific characteristics and enables us to analyse how the preference of households for green amenities, a transport tax, the provision of public transport alternatives and local neighbourhood design impact the environment (total emissions) as well as residents’ health (population exposure) and utility. We emphasise that environmental strategies in the form of urban compaction have a strong impact on the exposure of households to pollutants, especially close to the centre, in addition to their reduction of welfare. Our results suggest that more beneficial policy outcomes can be obtained from strategies which preserve green spaces close to the centre or which intend a greater shift from car to public transport. Further, we find indication that different local designs of neighbourhoods have much stronger impacts on the exposure–emission tension than city-wide land use or transport options. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 164 (18 UL)
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See detailUrban densities and patterns: stylized facts and generic abstract tools
Caruso, Geoffrey UL

Conference given outside the academic context (2019)

Detailed reference viewed: 47 (3 UL)
See detailUrban Development in Luxembourg: sustaining ambiguous fault lines of power
Carr, Constance UL

Presentation (2012, April)

Detailed reference viewed: 37 (5 UL)
See detailUrban Ecology. Definitions and Concepts
Endlicher, Wilfried; Langner, Marcel; Hesse, Markus UL

in LANGNER, Marcel; ENDLICHER, Wilfried (Eds.) Shrinking Cities: Effects on Urban Ecology and Challenges for Urban Development. (2007)

Detailed reference viewed: 108 (0 UL)
See detailUrban energy transitions through innovations in green building
Affolderbach, Julia; JUNG ép. PRELLER, Bérénice UL; Schulz, Christian UL

in König, Ariane (Ed.) Sustainability science (2018)

Detailed reference viewed: 115 (4 UL)
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See detailThe Urban Horse: Equestrian Traffic and Horse Husbandry in Late Medieval Cities
Meiers, Fabienne UL

Scientific Conference (2015, July 07)

Since the thriving of European cities in the 11th century, there was an increasing demand for faster and more reliable exchange services comparable with those in the Roman Empire: After the decline of the ... [more ▼]

Since the thriving of European cities in the 11th century, there was an increasing demand for faster and more reliable exchange services comparable with those in the Roman Empire: After the decline of the well-developed and regularly maintained Roman road network, circulation of people, goods and services had become less effective, particularly given that carriage traffic was virtually impossible on deteriorated roads. Consequently, equestrian traffic gained more importance in the medieval period, particularly in long-distance travels. In order to facilitate mobility and communication between cities, institutionally controlled mounted courier services were promoted and courier horses provided as well as travel horses for hire – both specially trained for their purpose. Moreover, decrees were adopted which regulated animal waste disposal and corpse removal to guarantee a hygienic living environment for both humans and animals. At the same time, specialized systems and structures for horse husbandry in the urban settings arose. The paper displays the characteristics, capacities and limitations of urban equestrian traffic and horse husbandry in the Late Middle Ages and presents the impact of the human-horse relationship in the urban environment. Pragmatic documents such as (travel) account books and legal texts were used as source base; they were analyzed using a comparative and quantitative methodology. In addition, the reflection of the urban horse in material culture was considered to emphasize a more dynamic dimension of the phenomenon. To conclude, the value of the urban horse in medieval townscapes, either as a daily companion or as a mere commodity, is discussed. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 57 (2 UL)
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See detailThe urban horse: Equestrian Traffic and Horse Husbandry in Late Medieval Cities
Meiers, Fabienne UL

Scientific Conference (2015, March 19)

Just like cattle, sheep and pigs, horses were part of the still agrarian influenced late medieval townscapes. Written and iconographic sources as well as archaeological evidence give proof of the ... [more ▼]

Just like cattle, sheep and pigs, horses were part of the still agrarian influenced late medieval townscapes. Written and iconographic sources as well as archaeological evidence give proof of the extensive presence of horses inside and outside the city walls and their indispensability for urban and interurban communication and mobility. Since the thriving of European cities in the High Middle Ages, there was an increasing demand for faster and more reliable exchange services comparable with those in the Roman Empire: after the decline of the well-developed and regularly maintained Roman road network, circulation of people, goods and services had become less effective, particularly given that carriage traffic was virtually impossible on deteriorated roads. Consequently, equestrian traffic gained more importance in the medieval period, as much in long-distance travels as in shorter day’s journeys. In order to facilitate urban mobility and communication between cities, traffic policies were developed, which consisted of road works, institutionally controlled mounted courier services and provision of courier horses, as well as travel allowances and travel horses for hire. In addition, the authorities adopted decrees which regulated animal waste disposal and corpse removal to guarantee a hygienic living environment for both humans and animals. At the same time specialized systems and structures for urban horse husbandry arose, e. g. stables for mounts of the city authorities and distinguished guests; on the other side, horse rental stations for the middle class emerged in the late 15th century. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 32 (0 UL)
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See detailUrban Interactions
Picard, Pierre M UL; Jun Sung, Kim; Patacchini, Eleonora et al

E-print/Working paper (2017)

This paper studies social-tie formation when individuals care about the geographical location of other individuals. In our model, the intensity of social interactions can be chosen at the same time as ... [more ▼]

This paper studies social-tie formation when individuals care about the geographical location of other individuals. In our model, the intensity of social interactions can be chosen at the same time as friends. We characterize the equilibrium in terms of both social interactions and social capital (the value of social interactions offered by each agent) for a general distribution of individuals in the urban geographical space. We show that greater geographical dispersion decreases the incentives to socially interact. We also show that the equilibrium frequency of interactions is lower than the effcient one. Using a unique geo-coded dataset of friendship networks among adolescents in the United States, we estimate the model and validate that agents interact less than the social first best optimum. Our policy analysis suggests that, given the same cost, subsidizing social interactions yields a higher total welfare than subsidizing transportation costs. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 7 (0 UL)
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See detailUrban liberties and citizenship from the Middle Ages to Today
Pauly, Michel UL

in Pauly, Michel; Lee, Alexander (Eds.) Urban liberty and citizenship from the Middle Ages up to now (2015)

Introduction to the book in French and English

Detailed reference viewed: 83 (3 UL)
See detailUrban liberties and citizenship from the Middle Ages up to now
Pauly, Michel UL; Lee, Alexander UL

Book published by Porta Alba Verlag (2015)

Actes du colloque 2009 de la Commission internationale pour l'Histoire des villes

Detailed reference viewed: 95 (2 UL)
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See detailUrban Logistics
Hesse, Markus UL

in Button, K.; Vega, H.; Nijkamp, P. (Eds.) A Dictionary of Transport Analysis (2010)

Detailed reference viewed: 61 (2 UL)
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See detailUrban Networks on the Move
Hesse, Markus UL

in German Cities - Success Beyond Growth? (2006)

Detailed reference viewed: 48 (1 UL)
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See detailThe Urban Planning Strategy in Al-Hussein Palestinian Refugee Camp in Amman: Heterogeneous Practices, Homogeneous Landscape
Oesch, Lucas UL

in Hanafi, Sari; Hilal, Leila; Takkenberg, Lex (Eds.) UNRWA and Palestinian Refugees: From Relief and Works to Human Development (2014)

Detailed reference viewed: 66 (12 UL)
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See detailUrban Policy in the Time of Obama
Hesse, Markus UL

in DISP Dokumente und Informationen zur Schweizerischen Orts-, Regional- und Landesplanung (2018), 54(212/1), 76

Detailed reference viewed: 30 (4 UL)
See detailUrban social structure, social capital and spatial proximity
Patacchini, Eleonora; Picard, Pierre M UL; Zenou, Yves

E-print/Working paper (2015)

We develop a theoretical model where the existence and intensity of dyadic contacts depend on location. We show that agents tend to interact more with agents that are highly central in the network of ... [more ▼]

We develop a theoretical model where the existence and intensity of dyadic contacts depend on location. We show that agents tend to interact more with agents that are highly central in the network of social contacts and that are geographically closer. Using a unique geo-coded dataset of friendship networks in the United States, we find evidence consistent with this model. The main empirical challenge, which is the possible endogenous network formation, is tackled by employing a Bayesian methodology that allows to estimate simultaneously network formation and intensity of network contacts. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 81 (14 UL)