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See detailWhat can critical entrepreneurship teaching offer to students when all they want is effectuation
Fletcher, Denise Elaine UL

Presentation (2015, May 26)

In this presentation, I consider what 'critical entrepreneurship' thinking and concepts can bring to entrepreneurship education. A summary of a review of 55 articles using the words 'critical' and ... [more ▼]

In this presentation, I consider what 'critical entrepreneurship' thinking and concepts can bring to entrepreneurship education. A summary of a review of 55 articles using the words 'critical' and 'entrepreneurship' is provided and a categorization of how critical notions are applied in entrepreneurship is outlined. [less ▲]

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See detailWhat can critical pedagogy learn from postmodernism? Further reflections on the impossible future of critical pedagogy
Biesta, Gert UL

in Gur-Ze’ev, Ilan (Ed.) Critical theory and critical pedagogy today. Toward a new critical language in education. (2005)

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See detailWhat can EAP tutors do for EMI lecturers?
Deroey, Katrien UL

Scientific Conference (2016, June 11)

This talk aims to engender discussion about how EAP tutors can support non-native speaker lecturers in an EMI context. I will first review research on EMI lecture discourse, including my study about ... [more ▼]

This talk aims to engender discussion about how EAP tutors can support non-native speaker lecturers in an EMI context. I will first review research on EMI lecture discourse, including my study about discourse organizational signals in native and non-native lecturer speech (cf. Deroey, 2015). Next I will present the results of an extensive needs analysis into lecturers’ perceived needs for EMI support at the multilingual University of Luxembourg. The needs analysis, which was performed by the University Language Centre, encompassed a university-wide online questionnaire (N=400) and semi-structured interviews with academic course directors (N=25). Results revealed that most EMI lecturers felt their English is at CEF level C2 and hence they were not usually looking to improve their English. Nevertheless, quite a few wanted to improve their pronunciation and grammar and were interested in training to help them teach in a language that is not their mother tongue. Similarly, the course directors were more concerned with lecturers improving their English for research writing rather than for lecturing. Finally, I will provide examples of how European universities have tried to support their staff in teaching through the medium of English. With this talk I hope to paint an informative picture of the needs EMI lecturers may have and open up a discussion about issues surrounding the provision of adequate and appropriate support. Deroey, K. L. B. (2015). Marking importance in lectures: interactive and textual orientation. Applied Linguistics, 36(1), 51-72. doi:10.1093/applin/amt029 [less ▲]

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See detailWhat can EuADS contribute to the European Network of Big Data Centers of Excellence?
Böhmer, Matthias UL; Krolak-Schwerdt, Sabine

Presentation (2017, January)

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See detailWhat can schools, teachers and learners learn from implicit learning research?
Reuter, Bob UL

Scientific Conference (2014, May 27)

Implicit learning research has shown us that we learn all the time, that we learn even when we have no intention to learn, no awareness of the fact that we are learning or no awareness of what we are ... [more ▼]

Implicit learning research has shown us that we learn all the time, that we learn even when we have no intention to learn, no awareness of the fact that we are learning or no awareness of what we are learning (Reber, 1967; Cleeremans, Destrebecqz, & Boyer, 1998; Reuter, 2013). However in schools and in school-oriented formal learning settings, we are supposed to build up a different type of knowledge that we can explicitly (most often verbally) remember and apply to new situations (Bloom, 1956). This distinction between implicit and explicit knowledge may however not be so clear-cut, for theoretical, methodological and empirical reasons, and, more importantly, it may not be very useful when applying basic cognitive science to educational practices. On the contrary, we want to invite teachers (and learners) to rather think of learning as a set of complex processes, where so-called implicit and explicit learning processes, more often than not, interactively work together to construct personal knowledge in our brains. Therefore we recommend using teaching strategies that foster both types of knowledge bases, so that explicit learning can efficiently build upon the results of implicit learning processes. [less ▲]

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See detailWhat can we learn from patients with heart failure about exercise adherence? A systematic review of qualitative papers.
Tierney, Stephanie; Mamas, Mamas; Skelton, Dawn et al

in Health psychology : official journal of the Division of Health Psychology, American Psychological Association (2011), 30(4), 401-10

OBJECTIVES: Keeping physically active has been shown to bring positive outcomes for patients diagnosed with heart failure (HF). However, a number of individuals with this health problem do not undertake ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVES: Keeping physically active has been shown to bring positive outcomes for patients diagnosed with heart failure (HF). However, a number of individuals with this health problem do not undertake regular exercise. A review of extant qualitative research was conducted to explore what it can tell us about barriers and enablers to physical activity among people with HF. METHODS: A systematic search, involving electronic databases and endeavors to locate gray literature, was carried out to identify relevant qualitative studies published from 1980 onward. Data from retrieved papers were combined using framework analysis. Papers read in full numbered 32, and 20 were included in the review. RESULTS: Synthesis of results from the 20 studies resulted in 4 main themes: Changing soma, negative emotional response, adjusting to altered status, and interpersonal influences. How individuals responded to their diagnosis and their altered physical status related to their activity levels, as did the degree of encouragement to exercise coming from family, friends, and professionals. These findings can be connected to the theory of behavioral change developed by Bandura, known as social cognitive theory (SCT). CONCLUSIONS: SCT may be a useful framework for developing interventions to support patients with HF in undertaking and maintaining regular exercise patterns. Specific components of SCT that practitioners may wish to consider include self-efficacy and outcome expectancies. These were issues referred to in papers for the systematic review that appear to be particularly related to exercise adherence. [less ▲]

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See detailWhat Constitutes Aging Workforce Management? Lessons Learned in an Industry-Specific Case Study
Streb, Christoph Klaus UL; Voelpel, S; Leibold, M et al

in Bornemeyer, C; Schneider, J (Eds.) Aging Society and its Implications for Services Marketing – Approaches in Hospitality, Tourism and Transport (2011)

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See detailWhat cultural psychologies need: Generalizing theories
Valsiner, Jaan UL

in Culture & Psychology (2014)

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See detailWhat Dignity Demands: From Political to Poetical Liberalism
Mailey, Richard Samuel David UL

Doctoral thesis (2017)

The thesis attempts to measure the disjoint between the promise of human dignity that appears at the heart of Western law (e.g. in national constitutions and international human rights instruments), and ... [more ▼]

The thesis attempts to measure the disjoint between the promise of human dignity that appears at the heart of Western law (e.g. in national constitutions and international human rights instruments), and the experiences of exclusion and frustration that, in 2017, have seen many Westerners turn to anti-liberal, populist demagogues for relief. In measuring this disjoint, the thesis looks to the work of liberal and anti-liberal theorists alike, including John Rawls, Bruce Ackerman, Carl Schmitt and Jacques Derrida. It then uses the insights gained to construct a liberal theory that can overcome the key problems identified, before using this theory to critically engage with the constitutional jurisprudence of three very different states: Canada, South Africa and the United States. [less ▲]

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See detailWhat do students say about the role of the minus sign in polynominals?
Vlassis, Joëlle UL

in Proceedings of the 33rd Conference of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education (2009)

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See detailWhat do we accept after an announcement?
de Boer, Mathijs UL; Herzig, Andreas; de Lima, Tiago et al

Scientific Conference (2008)

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See detailWhat Do We Know About Managing Aging Teams? Lessons Learned from the Automotive Shop Floor
Streb, Christoph Klaus UL; Gellert, F.J.

in Organizational Dynamics (2011), 40(2), 144-150

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See detailWhat Do We Learn from Spheroid Culture Systems? Insights from Tumorspheres Derived from Primary Colon Cancer Tissue.
Qureshi-Baig, Komal; Ullmann, Pit UL; Rodriguez, Fabien UL et al

in PLoS ONE (2016), 11

Due to their self-renewal and tumorigenic properties, tumor-initiating cells (TICs) have been hypothesized to be important targets for colorectal cancer (CRC). However the study of TICs is hampered by the ... [more ▼]

Due to their self-renewal and tumorigenic properties, tumor-initiating cells (TICs) have been hypothesized to be important targets for colorectal cancer (CRC). However the study of TICs is hampered by the fact that the identification and culturing of TICs is still a subject of extensive debate. Floating three-dimensional spheroid cultures (SC) that grow in serum-free medium supplemented with growth factors are supposed to be enriched in TICs. We generated SC from fresh clinical tumor specimens and compared them to SC isolated from CRC cell-lines as well as to adherent differentiated counterparts. Patient-derived SC display self-renewal capacity and can induce serial transplantable tumors in immuno-deficient mice, which phenotypically resemble the tumor of origin. In addition, the original tumor tissue and established SC retain several similar CRC-relevant mutations. Primary SC express key stemness proteins such as SOX2, OCT4, NANOG and LGR5 and importantly show increased chemoresistance ability compared to their adherent differentiated counterparts and to cell line-derived SC. Strikingly, cells derived from spheroid or adherent differentiating culture conditions displayed similar self-renewal capacity and equally formed tumors in immune-deficient mice, suggesting that self-renewal and tumor-initiation capacity of TICs is not restricted to phenotypically immature spheroid cells, which we describe to be highly plastic and able to reacquire stem-cell traits even after long differentiation processes. Finally, we identified two genes among a sphere gene expression signature that predict disease relapse in CRC patients. Here we propose that SC derived from fresh patient tumor tissue present interesting phenotypic features that may have clinical relevance for chemoresistance and disease relapse and therefore represent a valuable tool to test for new CRC-therapies that overcome drug resistance. [less ▲]

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See detailWhat do we need to say about a design method?
Gericke, Kilian UL; Eckert, Claudia; Stacey, Martin

in Proceedings of the 21st International Conference on Engineering Design (2017, August)

Method development is one of the raisons d’etre of engineering design research and method uptake by industry is perceived as an important success criterion. This paper argues that one of the problems with ... [more ▼]

Method development is one of the raisons d’etre of engineering design research and method uptake by industry is perceived as an important success criterion. This paper argues that one of the problems with methods is the lack of clarity about what is actually proposed to industry and the academic community when a new method is put forward, in terms of how detailed, strict, precise and rigorous the method is and what it can deliver. This paper puts the concept of method in the context of related concepts and proposes a multi-level model of the elements of a method to argue that a contribution on each of these levels can be of value and that the introduction of methods can fail on each of these levels. Implications thereof for industry and academia are discussed, concluding that a clear description of methods and their intended use is important for enabling proper validation of each of the method’s elements and for communicating methods to academia and industry. [less ▲]

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See detail‘WHAT DO YOU MEAN YOU LOST THE PAST?’ AGENCY, EXPRESSION AND SPECTACLE IN AMATEUR FILMMAKING
Wecker, Danièle UL

Doctoral thesis (2017)

The following thesis presents an examination of privately produced amateur films taken from the Amateur Film Archive in the Centre National d’Audiovisuel in Luxembourg. It analyzes how amateur films ... [more ▼]

The following thesis presents an examination of privately produced amateur films taken from the Amateur Film Archive in the Centre National d’Audiovisuel in Luxembourg. It analyzes how amateur films present a filmic world and examines specific notions of meaning generation without meta-data and original context. Rather than take amateur film as a homogenous genre or practice, this study concentrates on film language. The first part of the following two-fold engagement with these filmic worlds thus identifies the highly differentiated filmic modes that can be read from the images. A filmic mode is related to as a concomitance of style and choice in subject matter. Without original context, these films lose their most important means of meaning generation, namely the recollective narratives that are constructed by the intended audience in the viewing situation. This work operates from a basis of analysis that takes these images as remnants of a visual narration rather than in terms of recollective narratives. It operates from the very simple basis that what was filmed had significance for these filmmakers and how the camera was used can serve as illustration of underlying intentions and motivations—both intended and inadvertent. The first part of this study then focuses on the diversification within the images and reads concomitant cultural codifications that structure representational productions in the private and also analyzes film language as means of self-inscription and self-narration. The second part of this two-fold engagement explores filmic language in terms of a visualization of primordial signifying expression coming-into-being. It relates to amateur film and practice from a basis of primary Becoming rather than a fixed Being. This engagement extends to include the researcher and his/her own background as co-constitutive part of this process of primordial meaning coming-into-being. Film is related to as the opening of a filmic universe that presents its own structures and engagements and not as visualization of a profilmic world from the past. [less ▲]

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