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See detailWoorden en daden:Het pedagogisch analyseschema
Biesta, Gert UL; Verkuyl, H.S.

in Biesta, Gert; Korthagen, F.A.J.; Verkuyl, H.S. (Eds.) Pedagogisch bekeken. De rol van pedagogische idealen in de onderwijspraktik (2002)

Detailed reference viewed: 63 (0 UL)
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See detailWord recognition and reading comprehension of preschool children in Serbia
Aleksic, Gabrijela UL; Merrell, Christine; Tymms, Peter et al

in Scientific Studies of Reading (2018)

Detailed reference viewed: 82 (7 UL)
See detailWork and Care: Reconstructing Childhood through Childcare Policy in Germany
Honig, Michael-Sebastian UL

in James, Allison; James, Adrian L. (Eds.) European Childhoods. Cultures, Politics and Childhoods in Europe (2008)

Detailed reference viewed: 36 (0 UL)
See detailWork and residential cross-border mobilities for people working in Luxembourg : developments and impacts
Nienaber, Birte UL; Pigeron-Piroth, Isabelle UL; Roos, Ursula UL

Scientific Conference (2014, November 20)

Cross-border employment and residence are becoming a very important type of mobility in border regions. In the Greater Region, consisting of Luxembourg, Lorraine, Wallonia, Saarland and Rhineland ... [more ▼]

Cross-border employment and residence are becoming a very important type of mobility in border regions. In the Greater Region, consisting of Luxembourg, Lorraine, Wallonia, Saarland and Rhineland-Palatinate, around 213,000 people live and work in two different countries. Most of the cross-border commuters are employed in Luxembourg, representing 44% of the salaried population of Luxembourg. Additionally, the Greater Region is a space of cross-border residential mobility; meaning some people commuting to Luxembourg are former residents of Luxembourg and vice versa. The aim of this paper is to examine the development of the cross-border mobility phenomenon over the last 20 years, as well as to present principal cross-border residential flows of people working in Luxembourg. Furthermore, the paper discusses the impacts these flows have had on the Greater Region. A change has been recognized in the direction of migration flows. Whereas in the 1990s, most of cross-border residential migration was oriented towards Luxembourg, the direction has now changed towards the neighboring countries. Now some German, French and Belgian villages are impacted by these migration trends regarding e.g. an increase of housing prices, different languages, integration and schooling. Furthermore, from a conceptual point of view, it is difficult to describe the reality of the cross-border phenomenon due to the diversification of profiles and trajectories. This paper consists of two methodological strands, showing on one hand different cross-border developments based on large quantitative datasets and on the other hand giving an impression of impacts and challenges caused by cross-border migration based on qualitative interviews. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 110 (12 UL)
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See detailWork Context and Career Development
Pignault, Anne UL; Houssemand, Claude UL

Poster (2012, November)

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See detailWork Context and Career Development - Construction of a Work Context Inventory
Pignault, Anne UL; Houssemand, Claude UL

in Procedia Social and Behavioral Sciences (2013), 82

The aim of this study is to develop a tool to identify elements of perceived work contexts with the aim to improve career development practices. We think that to understand how the transfer of experience ... [more ▼]

The aim of this study is to develop a tool to identify elements of perceived work contexts with the aim to improve career development practices. We think that to understand how the transfer of experience occurs, it is necessary to comprehend the features of work contexts as well as the tasks and work activities in which a person is engaged, in order to propose effective career development practices. This article focuses on the construction and validation of an inventory of work contexts because, to our knowledge, no French-speaking tool exists. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 74 (6 UL)
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See detailWork fluctuations in quantum spin chains
Dorosz, Sven UL; Platini, Thierry; Karevski, Dragi

in Physical Review. E : Statistical, Nonlinear, and Soft Matter Physics (2008), 77(5),

Detailed reference viewed: 32 (0 UL)
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See detailWork in Progress! Negotiating Visual Politics at the Centre national de l'audiovisuel in Luxembourg
Poos, Françoise UL

in Priem, Karin; te Heesen, Kerstin (Eds.) On Display: Visual Politics, Material Culture and Education (2016)

Detailed reference viewed: 40 (3 UL)
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See detailWork producing reservoirs: Stochastic thermodynamics with generalized Gibbs ensembles
Horowitz, Jordan M.; Esposito, Massimiliano UL

in Physical Review. E : Statistical, Nonlinear, and Soft Matter Physics (2016), 94(020102),

We develop a consistent stochastic thermodynamics for environments composed of thermodynamic reservoirs in an external conservative force field, that is, environments described by the generalized or Gibbs ... [more ▼]

We develop a consistent stochastic thermodynamics for environments composed of thermodynamic reservoirs in an external conservative force field, that is, environments described by the generalized or Gibbs canonical ensemble. We demonstrate that small systems weakly coupled to such reservoirs exchange both heat and work by verifying a local detailed balance relation for the induced stochastic dynamics. Based on this analysis, we help to rationalize the observation that nonthermal reservoirs can increase the efficiency of thermodynamic heat engines. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 48 (2 UL)
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See detailWork statistics in stochastically driven systems
Verley, Gatien UL; Van den Broeck, Christian; Esposito, Massimiliano UL

in New Journal of Physics (2014), 16

We identify the conditions under which a stochastic driving that induces energy changes into a system coupled with a thermal bath can be treated as a work source. When these conditions are met, the work ... [more ▼]

We identify the conditions under which a stochastic driving that induces energy changes into a system coupled with a thermal bath can be treated as a work source. When these conditions are met, the work statistics satisfy the Crooks fluctuation theorem traditionally derived for deterministic drivings. We illustrate this fact by calculating and comparing the work statistics for a two-level system driven respectively by a stochastic and a deterministic piecewise constant protocol. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 70 (9 UL)
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See detailWork-life balance and relationships to others among French teleworkers
Vayre, Emilie; Pignault, Anne UL; Vonthron, Anne-Marie

Scientific Conference (2015, May)

Detailed reference viewed: 36 (3 UL)
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See detailWorkers' Housing Estates and their Residents: Constructions of Space and Collective Constitution of the Subject.
Caregari, Laure UL

in Wille, Christian; Reckinger, Rachel; Kmec, Sonja (Eds.) et al Spaces and Identities in Border Regions. Politics – Media – Subjects. (2016)

Detailed reference viewed: 25 (7 UL)
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See detailWorking conditions and work-related anger: A longitudinal perspective
Steffgen, Georges UL; Sischka, Philipp UL

Scientific Conference (2017, November 24)

Detailed reference viewed: 27 (6 UL)
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See detailWorking conditions indicative of work-related anger
Steffgen, Georges UL; Sischka, Philipp UL; Schmidt, Alexander F. UL

Scientific Conference (2016, July 21)

Detailed reference viewed: 62 (6 UL)
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See detailWorking memory and fluid intelligence
Conway, A; Macnamara, B; Engel de Abreu, Pascale UL

in Alloway, T; Alloway, R. G. (Eds.) Working Memory the Connected Intelligence (2013)

We are on the cusp of a new revolution in intelligence that affects every aspect of our lives from work and relationships, to our childhood, education, and old age. Working Memory, the ability to remember ... [more ▼]

We are on the cusp of a new revolution in intelligence that affects every aspect of our lives from work and relationships, to our childhood, education, and old age. Working Memory, the ability to remember and mentally process information, is so important that without it we could not function as a society or as individuals. People with superior working memory tend to have better jobs, better relationships, and more happy and fulfilling lives. People with poor working memory struggle in their work, their personal lives, and are more likely to experience trouble with the law. But there is exciting evidence emerging: working memory can be trained, and, as a result, we can change our circumstances. But what works and what doesn’t? And can all of us benefit from working memory training? This book reviews cutting-edge scientific research and examines how working memory influences our lives, as well as the evidence on working memory training. [less ▲]

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See detailWorking memory and fluid intelligence
Engel de Abreu, Pascale UL; Gathercole; Conway, A

Poster (2009, November)

The present study investigates how working memory and fluid intelligence are related in young children and which aspect of working memory span tasks– short-term storage or controlled attention - might ... [more ▼]

The present study investigates how working memory and fluid intelligence are related in young children and which aspect of working memory span tasks– short-term storage or controlled attention - might drive the relationship. A sample of 119 children were followed from kindergarten to 2nd grade and completed assessments of working memory, short-term memory, and fluid intelligence. The data showed that working memory, verbal short-term memory, and fluid intelligence were highly related but separate constructs in young children. The results further showed that when the common variance between working memory and short-term memory was controlled, the residual working memory factor manifested significant links with fluid intelligence whereas the residual short-term memory factor did not. These findings suggest that in young children the executive demands rather than the storage component of working memory span tasks are the source of their link with fluid intelligence. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 142 (3 UL)
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See detailWorking memory and fluid intelligence in young children
Engel de Abreu, Pascale UL; Gathercole, S; Conway, A

Scientific Conference (2011, July)

The study investigates how working memory and fluid intelligence are related in young children and how these links develop over time. The major aim is to determine which aspect of the working memory ... [more ▼]

The study investigates how working memory and fluid intelligence are related in young children and how these links develop over time. The major aim is to determine which aspect of the working memory system - short-term storage or cognitive control - drives the relationship with fluid intelligence. 119 children were followed from kindergarten to second grade and completed multiple assessments of working memory, short-term memory, and fluid intelligence. The data showed that working memory, short-term memory, and fluid intelligence were highly related but separate constructs in young children. When the common variance between working memory and short-term memory was controlled, the residual working memory factor manifested significant links with fluid intelligence whereas the residual short-term memory factor did not. These findings suggest that in young children cognitive control mechanisms rather than the storage component of working memory span tasks are the source of their link with fluid intelligence. [less ▲]

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See detailWorking memory and fluid intelligence in young children
Engel de Abreu, Pascale UL; Conway, A. R. A.; Gathercole, S. E.

in Intelligence (2010), 38(6), 552-561

The present study investigates how working memory and fluid intelligence are related in young children and how these links develop over time. The major aim is to determine which aspect of the working ... [more ▼]

The present study investigates how working memory and fluid intelligence are related in young children and how these links develop over time. The major aim is to determine which aspect of the working memory system-short-term storage or cognitive control-drives the relationship with fluid intelligence. A sample of 119 children was followed from kindergarten to second grade and completed multiple assessments of working memory, short-term memory, and fluid intelligence. The data showed that working memory, short-term memory, and fluid intelligence were highly related but separate constructs in young children. The results further showed that when the common variance between working memory and short-term memory was controlled, the residual working memory factor manifested significant links with fluid intelligence whereas the residual short-term memory factor did not. These findings suggest that in young children cognitive control mechanisms rather than the storage component of working memory span tasks are the source of their link with fluid intelligence. [less ▲]

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See detailWorking memory and fluid intelligence: A multi-mechanism view
Conway, A. R. A.; Macnamara, B.; Getz, S. et al

in Sternberg, R; Kaufman, S (Eds.) Cambridge Handbook of Intelligence (2011)

This volume provides the most comprehensive and up-to-date compendium of theory and research in the field of human intelligence. Each of the 42 chapters is written by world-renowned experts in their ... [more ▼]

This volume provides the most comprehensive and up-to-date compendium of theory and research in the field of human intelligence. Each of the 42 chapters is written by world-renowned experts in their respective fields, and collectively, they cover the full range of topics of contemporary interest in the study of intelligence. The handbook is divided into nine parts: Part I covers intelligence and its measurement; Part II deals with the development of intelligence; Part III discusses intelligence and group differences; Part IV concerns the biology of intelligence; Part V is about intelligence and information processing; Part VI discusses different kinds of intelligence; Part VII covers intelligence and society; Part VIII concerns intelligence in relation to allied constructs; and Part IX is the concluding chapter, which reflects on where the field is currently and where it still needs to go. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 141 (8 UL)