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See detailTeachers´ judgments and decision making: Studies concerning the transition from primary to secondary education and their implications for teacher education
Krolak-Schwerdt, Sabine UL; Pit-Ten Cate, Ineke UL; Hörstermann, Thomas UL

in Zlatkin-Troitschanskaia, Olga; Toepper, M.; Pant, H.A. (Eds.) et al Assessment of Learning Outcomes in Higher Education – Cross-national Comparisons and Perspectives (2018)

Accuracy in assessing academic achievement and potential is a core component of teachers’ diagnostic competence. Large-scale studies in the Luxembourgish and German educational systems show that teachers’ ... [more ▼]

Accuracy in assessing academic achievement and potential is a core component of teachers’ diagnostic competence. Large-scale studies in the Luxembourgish and German educational systems show that teachers’ secondary school track decisions are biased by a student’s social background. Therefore, biased assessment of students may contribute to the social inequalities observed in secondary schools in both countries. Within a social cognitive framework of dual-process theories, bias is explained by heuristic information processing, which, in contrast to information-integrating processing, relies on stereotype-based expectations to form judgments about students. A series of experimental studies investigated the information processing strategies of teachers, identifying a low accountability of the decision setting and a high consistency of student information as key moderators that promote stereotype-based information processing strategies in teachers’ school track decisions. Similar effects were shown for novice teachers at the beginning of their professional career. Further research evaluated intervention modules based on increased accountability, feedback, and increased knowledge about judgment formation processes. Results demonstrated that all evaluated intervention modules led to higher judgment accuracy and more information-integrating processing. Reviewing current models of teachers’ diagnostic competence, the findings on teachers’ information processing emphasized the need to include situational and process-oriented components into models of diagnostic competence. Beside a cognitive component – the ability to form accurate and unbiased judgments – diagnostic competence includes an adaptive choice of information processing strategies, depending on the accountability and information consistency of the judgment setting. Results on intervention modules gave insights how to increase diagnostic competence in teacher education programs. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 54 (6 UL)
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See detailTeaching a language in transformation: Chinese in globalisation
Li, Jinling; Juffermans, Kasper UL; Kroon, Sjaak et al

in NALDIC Quarterly (2012), 10(1), 38-42

Detailed reference viewed: 49 (0 UL)
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See detailTeaching Communicative and Intercultural Competence
Byram, Michael UL

in Lend: Lingua e nuova didattica (2013), XLII(2), 34-43

Detailed reference viewed: 45 (1 UL)
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See detailTeaching Complex Problem Solving Through Digital Game Design
Akcaoglu, Mete; Sonnleitner, Philipp UL; Hodges, Carl et al

Scientific Conference (2016, April)

Problem solving is one of the most essential skills for individuals to be successful at their daily lives and careers. When problems become complex, solving them involves identifying relationships among a ... [more ▼]

Problem solving is one of the most essential skills for individuals to be successful at their daily lives and careers. When problems become complex, solving them involves identifying relationships among a multitude of interrelated variables, to achieve multiple different possible solutions. Teaching Complex Problem Solving (CPS) skills in formal education contexts is challenging. In this research, we examined if through an innovative game-design course middle school students improved in their CPS skills. Our results showed that students showed significant improvements in their CPS skills, especially in terms of system exploration, t(10) = 2.787, p = .019; system knowledge, t(10) = 2.437, p = .35; system application, t(10) = 2.472, p = .033. In addition, there was a statistically significant change in students’ interest for CPS after attending the GDL program, t(6) = 3.890, p = .008. We discuss implications regarding use of game-design tasks as contexts to teach CPS skills in formal and informal educational contexts. [less ▲]

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See detailTeaching Foreign Languages in the Primary School: Principles and Practice.
Kirsch, Claudine UL

Book published by Continuum (2008)

Detailed reference viewed: 135 (2 UL)
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See detailTeaching languages in contact: the case of Luxembourg and Catalonia
Ehrhart, Sabine UL

Scientific Conference (2017, November 09)

Detailed reference viewed: 14 (1 UL)
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See detailteaching movies
Weber, Jean-Marie UL; Reuter, Anne-Marie

Scientific Conference (2012, December 17)

Detailed reference viewed: 48 (6 UL)
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See detailTeaching with Information and Communication Technologies : Results of a Large Scale Survey
Linckels, Serge UL; Kreis, Yves UL; Reuter, Bob UL et al

in Proceedings SIGUCCS Fall’09 (2009)

On behalf of the Ministry of Education in Luxembourg (Europe), 821 teachers - from primary school to higher education - were questioned in an online survey at the beginning of 2009 about their use of ... [more ▼]

On behalf of the Ministry of Education in Luxembourg (Europe), 821 teachers - from primary school to higher education - were questioned in an online survey at the beginning of 2009 about their use of information and communication technologies (ICT) in education. In this paper, we briefly present the context of the questionnaire and will then focus on its outcomes. The preliminary analysis of the results will mainly focus on the closed questions of the survey and try to answer several fundamental questions related to the availability, as well as to the current and the future usage of ICT in schools. Most of the teachers use ICT in some way in education, but printed documents remain the most popular source of information during class. The main argument listed to use ICT is the increase of students' motivation, while the major concern is the technical hardware dependency or unavailability. Also, an important number of teachers is concerned about the increased preparation time that is in most cases not rewarded. Finally, a vast majority of the teachers is willing to take part in an e-learning training program, probably because they feel unqualified or do not (yet) see the advantage of ICT for their classes. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 22 (2 UL)
See detailTeaching with trade books: Wonderful, wiggly worms
Siry, Christina UL

in Science and Children (2006), 43(7), 14-16

The article presents information about teaching worm behavior in a science classroom with the help of books like "Wiggling Worms at Work," by Wendy Pfeffer and "Squirmy Wormy Composters," by Bobbie Kalman ... [more ▼]

The article presents information about teaching worm behavior in a science classroom with the help of books like "Wiggling Worms at Work," by Wendy Pfeffer and "Squirmy Wormy Composters," by Bobbie Kalman and Janine Schaub. While the former book helps students understand the role organisms play in an ecosystem, the latter provides reference materials that can be used by students in designing experiments. With the examination of worms' body structure and behavior, students gain an appreciation of the ecological importance of worms. Experimenting with living creature in the classroom, it is equally important to follow appropriate safety guidelines including washing hands before and after handling worms. One such K-3 grade experiment is to create a worm jar to observe the tunneling behavior of worms. [less ▲]

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See detailTeam Approaches to Treating Children with Disabilities: A Comparison
Rosen, Carol; Miller, A. Cate; Pit-Ten Cate, Ineke UL et al

in Archives of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation (1998), 79(4), 430-434

Objective: To investigate differences in team functioning between the multidisciplinary and transdisciplinary models when treating children with disabilities. Design: A crossover trial. Setting: An ... [more ▼]

Objective: To investigate differences in team functioning between the multidisciplinary and transdisciplinary models when treating children with disabilities. Design: A crossover trial. Setting: An outpatient educational and rehabilitation program in a rehabilitation institute based at a university medical center. Participants: A population-based sample of 19 rehabilitation specialists and educators. Intervention: Participants attended four team meetings using the multidisciplinary approach and then attended four team meetings using the transdisciplinary approach. Outcome Measures: Behavioral ratings of team participation (Transdisciplinary Team Rating Scale) and self-report instruments of team development (Team Assessment Questionnaire) and treatment planning and goal development (Staff Perception Questionnaire). Results: Results of t tests confirmed the hypothesis that there was more team member participation during transdisciplinary meetings than during multidisciplinary meetings (p = .027), There were no differences in levels of team development (p = .329); however, staff members favored the transdisciplinary model for treatment planning and goal development (p < .001). Conclusion: This study provides evidence of the effectiveness of the transdisciplinary model. Further research is now needed to investigate outcome variables such as rate of success in attaining treatment goals when using this model. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 20 (1 UL)
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See detailTeam members’ network and the performance of new product development: the strength of strong ties
Brion, Sébastien; Chauvet, Vincent; Chollet, Barthelemy et al

Scientific Conference (2009)

Detailed reference viewed: 28 (0 UL)
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See detailTeam members’ network and the performance of new product development: the strength of strong ties
Brion, Sébastien; Chauvet, Vincent; Chollet, Barthelemy et al

Scientific Conference (2009)

Detailed reference viewed: 17 (0 UL)
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See detailTechFin vs. FinTech, Georgetown Journal of International Law 48 (2017) (mit Ross Buckley und Douglas Arner).
Zetzsche, Dirk Andreas UL; Buckley, Ross; Arner, Douglas

in Georgetown Journal of International Law 48 (2017) (2017)

Detailed reference viewed: 219 (7 UL)
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See detailTechnical Challenges for Cognitive Radio Application in Satellite Communications
Tarchi, Daniele; Guidotti, Alessandro; Icolari, Vincenzo et al

in 9th International Conference on Cognitive Radio Oriented Wireless Networks and Communications (CROWNCOM), 2014 (2014, June)

During the last years, spectrum scarcity has become one of the major issues for the development of new communication systems. Cognitive Radio (CR) approaches have gained an ever increasing attention from ... [more ▼]

During the last years, spectrum scarcity has become one of the major issues for the development of new communication systems. Cognitive Radio (CR) approaches have gained an ever increasing attention from system designers and operators, as they promise a more efficient utilization of the available spectral resources. In this context, while the application of CRs in terrestrial scenarios has been widely considered from both theoretical and practical viewpoints, their exploitation in satellite communications is still a rather unexplored area. In this paper, we address the definition of several satellite communications scenarios, where cognitive radio techniques promise to introduce significant benefits, and we discuss the major enablers and the associated challenges [less ▲]

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See detailTechnical solution for data collection, data safety and data privacy legislation: experiences from the SWEET study.
Forsander, Gun; Pellinat, Martin; Volk, Michael et al

in Pediatric diabetes (2012), 13(16), 39-48

BACKGROUND: One of the most important tasks of the SWEET study is benchmarking the data collected. Information on the occurrence of the disease of diabetes, the treatment, and their outcomes in children ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: One of the most important tasks of the SWEET study is benchmarking the data collected. Information on the occurrence of the disease of diabetes, the treatment, and their outcomes in children from the different member states of European Union (EU) is crucial. How the collection of data is realized is essential, concerning both the technical issues and the results. The creation of SWEET Centers of Reference (CoR), all over Europe will be facilitated by the access to safe data collection, where legal aspects and privacy are ascertained. OBJECTIVE: To describe the rationale for- and the technical procedure in the data collection implementation, in the SWEET study. SUBJECTS: Selected data on all patients treated at SWEET CoR are collected. METHODS: The SWEET project data collection and management system, consists of modular components for data collection, online data interchange, and a database for statistical analysis. CONCLUSION: The SWEET study and the organization of CoR aims for the goal of offering an updated, secure, and continuous evaluation of diabetes treatment regimens for all children with diabetes in Europe. To support this goal, an appropriate and secure data management system as described in this paper has been created. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 20 (0 UL)