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Peer Reviewed
See detailUnwrapping some euro area growth puzzles: Factor substitution, productivity and unemployment
Klump, Rainer UL; McAdam, Peter; Willman, Alpo

in JOURNAL OF MACROECONOMICS (2008), 30(2), 645-666

In this paper, we estimate a long run supply-side system incorporating a CES production function with time-varying factor-augmenting technical progress for the euro area over the period 1970-2005. We find ... [more ▼]

In this paper, we estimate a long run supply-side system incorporating a CES production function with time-varying factor-augmenting technical progress for the euro area over the period 1970-2005. We find that the elasticity of substitution lies below unity at 0.7, that labor-augmenting technical progress is dominant in the long run while capital-augmenting technical progress plays an important role in the interim period. Importantly, we also find evidence of a structural break in the pattern of biased technical progress towards the end of the 1990s. Our results help to solve two puzzles in Europe's recent growth experience which differ markedly from the US experience. The first is related to the effects of the IT boom in the 1990s on productivity growth in Europe. The second puzzle concerns the changes in the "Okun's law" relationship, linking growth to the reduction of unemployment, which are observable in Europe since the late 1990s. (C) 2007 Published by Elsevier Inc. [less ▲]

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See detailuORFdb--a comprehensive literature database on eukaryotic uORF biology.
Wethmar, Klaus; Barbosa Da Silva, Adriano UL; Andrade-Navarro, Miguel A. et al

in Nucleic acids research (2014), 42(1), 60-7

Approximately half of all human transcripts contain at least one upstream translational initiation site that precedes the main coding sequence (CDS) and gives rise to an upstream open reading frame (uORF ... [more ▼]

Approximately half of all human transcripts contain at least one upstream translational initiation site that precedes the main coding sequence (CDS) and gives rise to an upstream open reading frame (uORF). We generated uORFdb, publicly available at http://cbdm.mdc-berlin.de/tools/uorfdb, to serve as a comprehensive literature database on eukaryotic uORF biology. Upstream ORFs affect downstream translation by interfering with the unrestrained progression of ribosomes across the transcript leader sequence. Although the first uORF-related translational activity was observed >30 years ago, and an increasing number of studies link defective uORF-mediated translational control to the development of human diseases, the features that determine uORF-mediated regulation of downstream translation are not well understood. The uORFdb was manually curated from all uORF-related literature listed at the PubMed database. It categorizes individual publications by a variety of denominators including taxon, gene and type of study. Furthermore, the database can be filtered for multiple structural and functional uORF-related properties to allow convenient and targeted access to the complex field of eukaryotic uORF biology. [less ▲]

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See detailUpAM: UPCYCLING VIA ADDITIVE MANUFACTURING – HOW 3D PRINTING CAN ENHANCE CIRCULAR ECONOMY
Wolf, Claude UL; Kedziora, Slawomir UL

in REVUE TECHNIQUE LUXEMBOURGEOISE (2017), 2017(2), 38

The University of Luxembourg developed the project upAM upcycling using Additive Manufacturing with the cooperation of FabLab Belval and Luxinnovation. This project was partially financed by Luxembourg ... [more ▼]

The University of Luxembourg developed the project upAM upcycling using Additive Manufacturing with the cooperation of FabLab Belval and Luxinnovation. This project was partially financed by Luxembourg National Research Fund Luxembourg (FNR). An alternative to a linear economy: extracting raw materials, producing, consuming, and discarding of a product, there is another option: Circular Economy (CE): reusing products, repairing, recycling, and upcycling. A concept of a system/process (upAM) is developed to reuse unwanted or un-functional polymers issued from existing products/ systems. Waste prints can be re-printed into new products or systems with the same / higher quality or value than products created from raw materials. The upAM project is, therefore, concentrating on upcycling according to the definition given by author” Upcycling is a process in which used materials are converted into something of a higher value and/or quality in their second life”. This definition is simple and reflects fully the meaning of the upcycling process. This idea is not new; the concept of reused materials/products giving them a new life has been present for hundreds of years as a countermeasure against the lack of raw materials. At the moment, the situation in developed countries is evolving. Society is more aware that unlimited consumption leads to unlimited production of waste. Therefore, collective consciousness of a circular economy occurs, which supports greater resources of productivity aiming to reduce waste and avoid pollution by design, and purposeful reused waste materials and unwanted products. Upcycling via additive manufacturing could be an important part of the circular economy (CE). Obviously, the CE and especially the upcycling process lead to reducing the usage of new raw materials, and it results in a reduction of energy usage, air and water pollution and even greenhouse gas emissions. The development of maker movement and democratisation of FDM technology is also strongly influencing the needs and benefits of the upcycling process. The project upAM is developed to increase this idea so that any individual can produce their products with a higher added value using recycled raw materials via the open technology of FDM 3D Printer. [less ▲]

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See detailUpdatable Functional Encryption
Delerue Arriaga, Afonso UL; Iovino, Vincenzo UL; Tang, Qiang

in Paradigms in Cryptology - Mycrypt 2016. Malicious and Exploratory Cryptology, Second International Conference, Mycrypt 2016, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, December 1-2, 2016, Revised Selected Papers (2016)

Functional encryption (FE) allows an authority to issue tokens associated with various functions, allowing the holder of some token for function f to learn only f(D) from a ciphertext that encrypts D. The ... [more ▼]

Functional encryption (FE) allows an authority to issue tokens associated with various functions, allowing the holder of some token for function f to learn only f(D) from a ciphertext that encrypts D. The standard approach is to model f as a circuit, which yields inefficient evaluations over large inputs. Here, we propose a new primitive that we call updatable functional encryption (UFE), where instead of circuits we deal with RAM programs, which are closer to how programs are expressed in von Neumann architecture. We impose strict efficiency constrains in that the run-time of a token P' on ciphertext CT is proportional to the run-time of its clear-form counterpart (program P on memory D) up to a polylogarithmic factor in the size of D, and we envision tokens that are capable to update the ciphertext, over which other tokens can be subsequently executed. We define a security notion for our primitive and propose a candidate construction from obfuscation, which serves as a starting point towards the realization of other schemes and contributes to the study on how to compute RAM programs over public-key encrypted data. [less ▲]

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See detailUpdating the Precise Gravity Network at the BIPM
Jiang, Z.; Arias, E. F.; Tisserand, L. et al

in Geodesy for Planet Earth (2012)

Detailed reference viewed: 81 (11 UL)
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See detailUplink Capacity of MIMO Cellular Systems with Multicell Processing
Chatzinotas, Symeon UL; Imran, M. A.; Tzaras, C.

in ISWCS 2008 (2008)

Detailed reference viewed: 24 (1 UL)
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See detailUpper and lower body sensitivity to cold at rest and during exercise
Ouzzahra, Yacine UL; Redortier, Bernard; Voelcker, Thomas

in The Fourth International Conference on Human-Environment System (2011)

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See detailUpside down with the strong partial clones
Schölzel, Karsten UL

E-print/Working paper (2013)

Detailed reference viewed: 17 (4 UL)
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See detailUpstream Market Foreclosure
GABSZEWICZ, Jean; Zanaj, Skerdilajda UL

in Bulletin of Economic Research (2008), 60(1), 13-26

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See detailUpward social mobility and life satisfaction: the cases of United Kingdom and Switzerland
Samuel, Robin UL; Hadjar, Andreas UL

in Longitudinal and Life Course Studies (2015), 6(3), 13-14

Status is a major determinant of subjective well-being (SWB). This is one of the primary assumptions of social production function theory. In contrast, the dissociative hypothesis holds that upward social ... [more ▼]

Status is a major determinant of subjective well-being (SWB). This is one of the primary assumptions of social production function theory. In contrast, the dissociative hypothesis holds that upward social mobility may be linked to identity problems, cognitive distress, and reduced levels of SWB because of lost ties to one’s class of origin. In our paper, we use panel data from the United Kingdom (British Household Panel Survey) and Switzerland (Swiss Household Panel) to test these hypotheses. These two countries are compared because historically, social inequality and upward mobility have played distinct roles in each country’s popular discourse. We conduct longitudinal multilevel analyses to gauge the effects of intragenerational and intergenerational upward mobility on life satisfaction (as a cognitive component of SWB), controlling for previous levels of life satisfaction, dynamic class membership, and well-researched determinants of SWB such as age and health problems. Our results provide some evidence for effects of social class and social mobility on well-being in the UK sample, however, there are no such effects in the Swiss sample. The UK findings support the idea of dissociative effects, that is, intergenerational upward mobility is negatively associated with SWB. [less ▲]

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See detailUrbain-rural : dichotomie ou dialectique ?
Kmec, Sonja UL; Glesener, Jeanne UL

in Articulo : Journal of Urban Research (2010), (3), 1-2

Detailed reference viewed: 55 (3 UL)
Peer Reviewed
See detailUrban Air Makes Who Free? Immigration and Urban Citizenship in Contemporary Europe
Koff, Harlan UL

in Pauly, Michel; Lee, Alexander (Eds.) Urban liberties and citizenship from the Middle Ages up to now (2015)

Detailed reference viewed: 42 (4 UL)
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See detailUrban compactness and the trade-off between air pollution emission and exposure: Lessons from a spatially explicit theoretical model
Schindler, Mirjam UL; Caruso, Geoffrey UL

in Computers, Environment & Urban Systems (2014), 45

Air pollution is a major concern in urban areas worldwide. The interplay between urban structure and air pollution from an environmental, health and social perspective is the focus of our work: we model ... [more ▼]

Air pollution is a major concern in urban areas worldwide. The interplay between urban structure and air pollution from an environmental, health and social perspective is the focus of our work: we model how urban structure impacts traffic-induced pollutant emissions and the exposure of residents to those pollutants. We present a chain of models applied to theoretical monocentric space: a residential choice model with endogenous open-space and road network, a commuting traffic generation and road assignment model and a pollutant emissions, dispersion and exposure model. The theoretical study approach decouples results from location specific characteristics and enables us to analyse how the preference of households for green amenities, a transport tax, the provision of public transport alternatives and local neighbourhood design impact the environment (total emissions) as well as residents’ health (population exposure) and utility. We emphasise that environmental strategies in the form of urban compaction have a strong impact on the exposure of households to pollutants, especially close to the centre, in addition to their reduction of welfare. Our results suggest that more beneficial policy outcomes can be obtained from strategies which preserve green spaces close to the centre or which intend a greater shift from car to public transport. Further, we find indication that different local designs of neighbourhoods have much stronger impacts on the exposure–emission tension than city-wide land use or transport options. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 142 (18 UL)
See detailUrban Development in Luxembourg: sustaining ambiguous fault lines of power
Carr, Constance UL

Presentation (2012, April)

Detailed reference viewed: 21 (5 UL)
See detailUrban Ecology. Definitions and Concepts
Endlicher, Wilfried; Langner, Marcel; Hesse, Markus UL

in LANGNER, Marcel; ENDLICHER, Wilfried (Eds.) Shrinking Cities: Effects on Urban Ecology and Challenges for Urban Development. (2007)

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See detailThe Urban Horse: Equestrian Traffic and Horse Husbandry in Late Medieval Cities
Meiers, Fabienne UL

Scientific Conference (2015, July 07)

Since the thriving of European cities in the 11th century, there was an increasing demand for faster and more reliable exchange services comparable with those in the Roman Empire: After the decline of the ... [more ▼]

Since the thriving of European cities in the 11th century, there was an increasing demand for faster and more reliable exchange services comparable with those in the Roman Empire: After the decline of the well-developed and regularly maintained Roman road network, circulation of people, goods and services had become less effective, particularly given that carriage traffic was virtually impossible on deteriorated roads. Consequently, equestrian traffic gained more importance in the medieval period, particularly in long-distance travels. In order to facilitate mobility and communication between cities, institutionally controlled mounted courier services were promoted and courier horses provided as well as travel horses for hire – both specially trained for their purpose. Moreover, decrees were adopted which regulated animal waste disposal and corpse removal to guarantee a hygienic living environment for both humans and animals. At the same time, specialized systems and structures for horse husbandry in the urban settings arose. The paper displays the characteristics, capacities and limitations of urban equestrian traffic and horse husbandry in the Late Middle Ages and presents the impact of the human-horse relationship in the urban environment. Pragmatic documents such as (travel) account books and legal texts were used as source base; they were analyzed using a comparative and quantitative methodology. In addition, the reflection of the urban horse in material culture was considered to emphasize a more dynamic dimension of the phenomenon. To conclude, the value of the urban horse in medieval townscapes, either as a daily companion or as a mere commodity, is discussed. [less ▲]

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See detailThe urban horse: Equestrian Traffic and Horse Husbandry in Late Medieval Cities
Meiers, Fabienne UL

Scientific Conference (2015, March 19)

Just like cattle, sheep and pigs, horses were part of the still agrarian influenced late medieval townscapes. Written and iconographic sources as well as archaeological evidence give proof of the ... [more ▼]

Just like cattle, sheep and pigs, horses were part of the still agrarian influenced late medieval townscapes. Written and iconographic sources as well as archaeological evidence give proof of the extensive presence of horses inside and outside the city walls and their indispensability for urban and interurban communication and mobility. Since the thriving of European cities in the High Middle Ages, there was an increasing demand for faster and more reliable exchange services comparable with those in the Roman Empire: after the decline of the well-developed and regularly maintained Roman road network, circulation of people, goods and services had become less effective, particularly given that carriage traffic was virtually impossible on deteriorated roads. Consequently, equestrian traffic gained more importance in the medieval period, as much in long-distance travels as in shorter day’s journeys. In order to facilitate urban mobility and communication between cities, traffic policies were developed, which consisted of road works, institutionally controlled mounted courier services and provision of courier horses, as well as travel allowances and travel horses for hire. In addition, the authorities adopted decrees which regulated animal waste disposal and corpse removal to guarantee a hygienic living environment for both humans and animals. At the same time specialized systems and structures for urban horse husbandry arose, e. g. stables for mounts of the city authorities and distinguished guests; on the other side, horse rental stations for the middle class emerged in the late 15th century. [less ▲]

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See detailUrban liberties and citizenship from the Middle Ages to Today
Pauly, Michel UL

in Pauly, Michel; Lee, Alexander (Eds.) Urban liberty and citizenship from the Middle Ages up to now (2015)

Introduction to the book in French and English

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See detailUrban liberties and citizenship from the Middle Ages up to now
Pauly, Michel UL; Lee, Alexander UL

Book published by Porta Alba Verlag (2015)

Actes du colloque 2009 de la Commission internationale pour l'Histoire des villes

Detailed reference viewed: 59 (2 UL)