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See detailMusic as Education in History
Sagrillo, Damien UL

Scientific Conference (2018, May 03)

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See detailMusic Education and Musical Diversity in the Wind Band
Sagrillo, Damien UL

Scientific Conference (2014, July 21)

In this presentation I focus on the situation in my country, Luxembourg. I nevertheless assume that my findings have a general validity in other countries of the continent. For many professional musicians ... [more ▼]

In this presentation I focus on the situation in my country, Luxembourg. I nevertheless assume that my findings have a general validity in other countries of the continent. For many professional musicians, playing a wind instrument or percussion in a wind band often is the first step towards a professional career in an orchestra or as a music teacher. Informal learning within the social structures of a wind orchestra will complement formal and non-formal music learning in the general school system as well as in the music schools. Yet, for most young musicians, membership in the local band remains the ultimate aim of their musical training. A further musical career is often only planned at a later date and depends on factors like musical interest and talent. With the help of selected interviewees, I will give some answers about how music education and wind band playing interact. What are individual experiences in relation to wind bands and to music education? Can they be generalized, and how can these findings help music education fulfill the needs of today’s reality in relation to public music practice? Furthermore, the question of musical diversity will be raised. What does musical diversity mean, how is it perceived, and how, respectively whether it is practiced at all in a wind band? Examples of musical diversity will then be discussed. Is music education adapted to the challenges of musical practice in a band, for example, in terms of musical diversity, or are there any unnecessary burdens that could be replaced by more useful practical courses? How much informal learning is acquired through musical practice in a band? [less ▲]

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See detailMusic Education and Musical Diversity Presented by the Example of Wind Bands in Luxembourg
Sagrillo, Damien UL

in Habla, Bernhard (Ed.) Alta Musica Band 33 (2016)

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See detailMusic education in general schools. Teachers and their Anxiety Facing the Task
Sagrillo, Damien UL

Presentation (2019, April 10)

The beneficial effect of music and music education on general education, but also on the individual, has been the subject of a number of (controversial) studies, such as long-term observation in basic ... [more ▼]

The beneficial effect of music and music education on general education, but also on the individual, has been the subject of a number of (controversial) studies, such as long-term observation in basic schools in Berlin. H.G. Bastian and his team (2002) have demonstrated the beneficial social effect of in-depth musical education. Other research has revealed a persistent lack of confidence in music education for students and teachers (Holden / Button 2006) . Still others have analysed the potential of extracurricular music education (Kivi 2018) . The anguish of non-specialized trainers in music education is often reflected in clichéd arguments such as: "I haven't done solfege; I'm not musical; I can't sing" So the lack of declarative knowledge prevents skills. The aim is to highlight concepts developed with the focus on two musical traditions (German and French), e.g. the G.D. of Luxembourg, with the aim to provide future teachers with didactic skills. [less ▲]

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See detailMusic Education in Luxembourg and its Assessment
Sagrillo, Damien UL

in Korom, Erzsébet; Pásztor, Attila (Eds.) 12th Conference on Educational Assessment – CEA 2014 (2014, May 01)

Music Education in Luxembourg and its Assessment. 1. Assessment of Pupils According to Martin Fautley (2012), not everything what is taught, is always learned, and therefore music education also needs ... [more ▼]

Music Education in Luxembourg and its Assessment. 1. Assessment of Pupils According to Martin Fautley (2012), not everything what is taught, is always learned, and therefore music education also needs assessment. In my lecture I will first give a short insight into the formal school system in Luxembourg and its recent change from summative to formative evaluation. In 1998 the parliament of Luxembourg voted a law of music education. The aim was to offer an equal level of music education in every region of the country and to motivate more children to attend music courses. The assessment system in music schools was based on summative evaluation known from general schools. Current tendencies finally try to adopt a more smooth method of evaluation in order to improve the pupil’s learning success and in order to critically scrutinize the teacher’s training activity. After the description of the organization of music schools in Luxembourg, I will consider this change of paradigm. 2. Assessment of the System? Music education in Luxembourg is based on the francophone system of solfège, a method for future singers and professional musicians, including audiation for beginners at the youngest age. It is also partially transferred to some instrumental disciplines. However, during the last two decades, in these countries – France and Belgium – solfège has been replaced by a less rigorous and better-adapted method of musical training. In contrast to these countries, the Luxembourg system of music education never has been assessed. Music-school teachers graduate in the neighboured countries. While degree holders from music universities based on the German system have to study educational sciences (a minority), their colleagues issued from the French tradition (the majority) never did. They specialized in their main discipline, are skilful artists, but have no pedagogical grade and acquire educational skills in learning by doing or not at all. But, decisions concerning further development and pedagogical improvements should be managed in accordance to todays (pedagogical) needs. My paper will focus on this weak point in giving a historical insight into the system of solfège and its didactics over the centuries beginning with Guido of Arezzo up to Rousseau until its current use in Luxembourg and, depending on it, the instrumental disciplines. I will focus on the pedagogical needs, which have led to changes over this long epoch. An independent evaluation of music education in Luxembourg by external is absolutely necessary. I will conclude with some reflections on statements by some alumni of music-schools, which could serve as a model for an external assessment. [less ▲]

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See detailMusic Education in Luxembourg. For a Broad Base of the Youth or for a Selected Elite
Sagrillo, Damien UL

Scientific Conference (2011, May 21)

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See detailMusic Education in Luxembourg: A Critical Review
Sagrillo, Damien UL

in International Aspects of Music Education, volume 1, Teaching and Learning Processes, edited by Gabriela Karin Konkol & Roman Nieczyporowski (2013), 1

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See detailMusic Education in the Focus of Historical Concepts and New Horizons
Sagrillo, Damien UL; Brusniak, Friedhelm; Buzás, Zsuzsanna et al

Book published by John Von Neumann University (2019)

The 50th anniversary of the death in 1967 of the famous music teacher, ethnomusicologist and composer Zoltán Kodály reminded us that another renowned music pedagogue, Leo Kestenberg (1882-1962), was born ... [more ▼]

The 50th anniversary of the death in 1967 of the famous music teacher, ethnomusicologist and composer Zoltán Kodály reminded us that another renowned music pedagogue, Leo Kestenberg (1882-1962), was born in the same year as Kodály. As such, the joint Kodály Kestenberg Conference provided a welcome opportunity not only to address aspects of music pedagogical and biographical research which had hitherto received a limited amount of attention, but also to highlight a number of key moments in history, and the resulting impact these had had on music pedagogy. The significant level of international interest which music educators showed in the Kodály Kestenberg Conference fulfilled the organisers' desire to create a forum for the free exchange ideas. It also enabled participants to review our commonalities and differences and to look beyond our individual national developments and evaluate the methods and concepts of two significant personalities in the history of musical education in the first half of the 20th century. The sheer diversity of historical and current topics in music education research both inside and outside of Europe, not only reflects the fact that in the 21st century, music education research has established and profiled itself in a wide range of sub-disciplines in addition to revealing new fields of inter-disciplinary research. The effectiveness of reforms initiated and implemented by Kodály and Kestenberg extend to the present day and continue to influence discussions around the future perspectives of music education. This is illustrated by the example of formal and informal learning in the field of elementary music pedagogy. The "Century of the Child" proclaimed in 1900 by the Swedish reform pedagogue Ellen Key (1849–1926) has left its mark on music education through reformers such as Kodály and Kestenberg into the 21st century. This conference book contains articles which are subdivided in five sub-categories: (1) The function of Music Education, (2) The Historical Era of Kodály and Kestenberg, (3) Learning and Instruction, (4) Assessment Technologies in Music Education and (5) Effects of Music Training. The contributors come from six different countries namely, Austria, England, Germany, Hungary, Israel and Luxembourg. The editors would like to record their thanks to both: (1) the Pedagogical Faculty of the John von Neumann University, Kecskemét and the dean Dr. Fülöp Tamás and the vice-dean Dr. Sági Norberta for hosting the conference, (2) the International Leo Kestenberg Society. The editors also acknowledge that this research is supported by EFOP-3.6.1- 16-2016-00006 “The development and enhancement of the research potential at John von Neumann University” project. The Project is supported by the Hungarian Government and co-financed by the European Social Fund. The editors finally thank Ms. Caroline Reuter from the University of Luxembourg for the review of the layout. [less ▲]

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See detailMusic Education. Identities. European Context and Diversity
Sagrillo, Damien UL

Scientific Conference (2015, January 29)

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See detailMusic learning and Solfège in Germany, Luxembourg and Hungary
Sagrillo, Damien UL

Scientific Conference (2015, June 20)

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See detailMusic, Music Education and Musical Heritage
Sagrillo, Damien UL

Presentation (2017, November 17)

One of the statements concerning music education which impresses me the most is the following of Werner Jank and Martin Stroh (W. Jank, W.M. Stroh, Aufbauender Musikunterricht – Königsweg oder Sackgasse ... [more ▼]

One of the statements concerning music education which impresses me the most is the following of Werner Jank and Martin Stroh (W. Jank, W.M. Stroh, Aufbauender Musikunterricht – Königsweg oder Sackgasse, http://www.musik-for.uni-oldenburg.de/vortraege/afs2005_jankstrohtext.pdf): ‘Many people do not take the discipline of music quite seriously. Unfortunately, they are right many times. Ironically, despite our thematic oversupply as regards music, we deny the children and youths at school experiences of true learning success by demanding too little of them. ’It describes on a gloomy note the problems which music teachers face regarding music and its heritage. Considering the curricula all over Europe however, we find a surprising uniformity including singing, musicking, listening, moving to the music, musical creativity and knowledge about music. On the other hand, music cannot be compared to any other discipline. Music literacy must be acquired in music schools on a voluntary basis and complementary to formal education. Music can be learned informally in a lifelong process, for example in community ensembles. Additionally, the question has to be raised which kind of music should be learned. Musical heritage is a social construction and represented in a world of changing media; music is more and more consumed and less and less actively practiced or learned in schools. It is for this reason that music education lags behind the development and has a challenging position in the canon of school subjects. However, we should not forget that the UNESCO selected two 1) In 2011: Táncház method: a Hungarian model for the transmission of intangible cultural heritage and 2) In 2016: Safeguarding of the folk music heritage by the Kodály concept on the register of intangible cultural heritage of human kind. And as luck would have it, both deal with music education, and both have their origins in Hungary. Should this be understood as a hint of the responsible persons of the UNESCO to developers of school curricula not to underestimate or simply to ignore music education in the canon of school subjects? One of its problems is that it has to cover a wide range of contents. Music is not only the music of the today’s modern popular music or the music of the famous masters, but, from an ethnomusicological point of view, the music of our region, our nation, or continent or the music of others far from the globalised mainstream. One could say globalisation and musical heritage form two antipodes. But, as several interviews with my students reveal, globalisation, with the help of digitisation, can also enable a worldwide access to regional music traditions. Zoltán Kodály’s and Leo Kestenberg’s commitment to music education is today still relevant. In Germany, the system of music education is still building on the achievements of Leo Kestenberg. Zoltan Kodály’s concept, based on a national / regional tradition, has reached a global standing. More as for others, his legacy deals with Music, Music Education and Musical Heritage. [less ▲]

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See detailMusik & Kreativität
Sagrillo, Damien UL

Scientific Conference (2008, July)

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See detailMusik im Land der Roten Erde
Sagrillo, Damien UL

in Mutations - Terres Rouges. Approche interdisciplinaire et transnationale (2010)

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See detailDie Musik im Land der Roten Erde
Sagrillo, Damien UL

Scientific Conference (2008, April)

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See detailMusik, musikalische Bildung und musikalische Überlieferung
Sagrillo, Damien UL

Book published by Margraf (2017)

Friedhelm Brusniak will have duly celebrated his sixty-fifth birthday with birthday cake, sparkling wine and other culinary delicacies in the family. The present academic birthday cake is addressed to the ... [more ▼]

Friedhelm Brusniak will have duly celebrated his sixty-fifth birthday with birthday cake, sparkling wine and other culinary delicacies in the family. The present academic birthday cake is addressed to the friend and colleague Friedhelm Brusniak in recognition of his life achievement. The authorship is composed of companions with whom Friedhelm Brusniak, on the one hand, was, closely connected during his long career as a scholar, and, on the other hand, with fellow researchers, he came later into contact as a networker in the international context. For the editor, it was important that the academic freedom of every one should be respected and that no restrictions should be imposed on the authors. The 21 articles, in four languages – German, English, French, Italian – are published in alphabetical order of the authors. (The only exception are the texts by Andreas Eschen and Anna-Christine Rhode-Jüchtern. They are related and printed successively.) The authors come from Germany, France, Great Britain, Italy, Luxembourg, Austria, Poland, Slovenia, Hungary and the United States of America. The portrait at the beginning of the book was drawn by Barbara Plattner. The articles are preceded by four greeting messages, including a sounding one composed by longtime friend Heinz Werner Zimmermann. Although ordered without a thematic context, the contributions reflect the considerable spectrum of the long-standing scientific work of Friedhelm Brusniak. In addition to his ambitious work as a university professor and scholar, he did never refrain from accepting additional responsibilities, e.g. from 1994 to 2002 as President of the German Mozart-Society and from 2009 to 2013 as the first chairman of the Hermann Zilcher Society. The texts in connection with Leo Kestenberg occupy a large part of the book. This will be noted with satisfaction by Friedhelm Brusniak, president (since 2012) of the International Leo-Kestenberg-Society. Furthermore, the reader will find texts on choral, wind and amateur music research ("community music") as well as on questions of music education in a historical context and an empirical perspective. Also, the contributions cover a timeframe of more than 400 years. They deal s.l. with cultural heritage in a multi-faceted Europe and beyond. Finally, the essays with a philosophical-religious background and in connection with Freemasonry should be emphasized do not stand alone but should be considered as an integrative part. The editor is particularly satisfied and grateful from coming personally in contact with Karl-Heinrich Ehrenforth, the esteemed colleague and friend of Friedhelm Brusniak, and that Prof. Ehrenforth probably provided his last publication to this Festschrift. After his death, his daughter, Christiane Ehrenforth, granted permission to publish. Friedhelm Brusniak’s affinity for interdisciplinarity was met more unconsciously than consciously. He uses the term "interface research"! This has been the case for biography research since his employment with Conrad Rein as well as for musicological research from his home region Waldeck. This is especially true for choral music research, which became his central field of scholarship at the beginning of the nineties. Friedhelm Brusniak comes from a family wind musicians. In the research efforts of the International Society for the Research and Promotion of Wind Music (IGEB), he recognised the congeniality to choral music research, s.l. "community music". For many years now, his contributions to IGEB conferences have received much attention. Conversely, Friedhelm Brusniak received, since the beginning of the eighties, the decisive impulses from the IGEB under Wolfgang Suppan, which he was able to transfer to choral music research and to the Singer Museum in Feuchtwangen, where he serves as a scientific head. As a trained music educator and chair of the Department of Music Education at the University of Würzburg, Friedhelm Brusniak maintained European and international partnerships with music pedagogues, initially in the Arbeitsgemeinschaft Süd (AG Süd) and then in the Forum of European Music Pedagogy (FEMP). His connection with Luxembourg, at the intersection of French and German music pedagogic traditions, was a matter of concern to Friedhelm Brusniak. He was particularly inspired to detect and expand European networks. Please refer to Martin Straus, who provides a more detailed glimpse in the following article. The number of non-German authors is an impressive proof of Friedhelm Brusniak’s constant and interesting view across the borders of his country and his successfully established and maintained contacts. [less ▲]

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See detailMusikalische Bildung - (drei) europäische Taditionen im Überblick
Sagrillo, Damien UL

Scientific Conference (2016, November 10)

I will present the two personalities of Leo Kestenberg and Marcel Landowski; I will describe their life-work and relate it to Zoltán Kodály, the eminent Hungarian composer, ethnomusicologist and music ... [more ▼]

I will present the two personalities of Leo Kestenberg and Marcel Landowski; I will describe their life-work and relate it to Zoltán Kodály, the eminent Hungarian composer, ethnomusicologist and music pedagogue. However, the study will be based on Marcel Landowski, because, until now, no German documents are dealing with his life and achievements. Although acknowledged in their countries as musicians and of music organisers, Kestenberg and Landowski are not known in the respective other country. On the other hand, Zoltán Kodály is recognised worldwide. It is for this reason that a comparative study is necessary. Nevertheless, this paper cannot be complete but should be a motivation for further research about the organisation of music education, the organisation of music including the political background in the countries presented in this document or the larger context of European nations. [less ▲]

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See detailMusikalische Bildung. Deutsche und französische Tradition im Überblick
Sagrillo, Damien UL

in Gradus (2017), 4(1),

In den folgenden Zeilen wird es darum gehen, die beiden Persönlichkeiten Leo Kestenberg und Marcel Landowski vorzustellen, ihr Lebenswerk zu beleuchten, zu vergleichen und mit dem ungarischen Komponisten ... [more ▼]

In den folgenden Zeilen wird es darum gehen, die beiden Persönlichkeiten Leo Kestenberg und Marcel Landowski vorzustellen, ihr Lebenswerk zu beleuchten, zu vergleichen und mit dem ungarischen Komponisten, Musikethnologen und Musikpädagogen Zoltán Kodály in Zusammenhang zu bringen. Im Vordergrund wird aber immer Marcel Landowski stehen, da von ihm in deutscher Sprache bis jetzt so gut wie nichts vorliegt. Obschon in ihren Ländern durchaus als Musiker und Wegbereiter der Organisation des Musiklebens anerkannt, sind Kestenberg und Landowski, im Gegensatz zu Zoltán Kodály, in den jeweilig anderen Ländern so gut wie unbekannt. Eine vergleichende Studie bietet sich demnach an. Dennoch kann sie nicht komplett sein, sondern Anregung sein für weitere Nachforschungen über Organisation musikalischer Bildung und deren politischen Hintergrund in den an dieser Stelle behandelten Ländern bzw. in den europäischen Nationen überhaupt. In the following lines, I will present the two personalities of Leo Kestenberg and Marcel Landowski; I will describe their life-work and relate it to Zoltán Kodály, the eminent Hungarian composer, ethnomusicologist and music pedagogue. However, the study will be based on Marcel Landowski, because, until now, no German documents are dealing with his life and achievements. Although acknowledged in their countries as musicians and of music organisers, Kestenberg and Landowski are not known in the respective other country. On the other hand, Zoltán Kodály is recognised worldwide. It is for this reason that a comparative study is necessary. Nevertheless, this paper cannot be complete but should be a motivation for further research about the organisation of music education, the organisation of music including the political background in the countries presented in this document or the larger context of European nations. [less ▲]

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See detailMusikalische Bildung. Deutsche, französische und ungarische Traditionen im Überblick
Sagrillo, Damien UL

in Brusniak, Friedhelm; Sagrillo, Damien (Eds.) Vom ersten Kongress der Gesellschaft für Musikerziehung in Prag 1936 bis 2016 (2018)

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