References of "Wellington Working Papers in Linguistics"
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See detailUsing workplaces to research attitudes and behaviours towards the Maori language in Wellington
De Bres, Julia UL

in Wellington Working Papers in Linguistics (2007), 19

This research report discusses the workplace-based methodological design and selected findings of my PhD research on the attitudes and behaviours of non-Māori New Zealanders towards the Māori language. A ... [more ▼]

This research report discusses the workplace-based methodological design and selected findings of my PhD research on the attitudes and behaviours of non-Māori New Zealanders towards the Māori language. A participant recruitment approach at nine white-collar workplaces in Wellington was used to attempt to access non-Māori participants with a range of attitudes towards the Māori language. Although this workplace-based design was mainly intended to facilitate access to a range of participants, the data collection also resulted in a number of findings relating to Māori language in the workplace in particular. This report discusses a selection of these findings, including the association between participants’ workplaces and their attitudes towards the Māori language, participants’ stated behaviours towards the Māori language at work (including pronunciation of Māori words, using Māori words and phrases, and responding to the use of Māori by others) and participants’ views on how their workplace environment constrains and/or fosters their Māori language use. [less ▲]

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See detailIntergenerational attitudes towards Dutch language maintenance in New Zealand
De Bres, Julia UL

in Wellington Working Papers in Linguistics (2004), 16

This paper discusses the results of an exploratory study undertaken to investigate changes in individual and societal attitudes towards Dutch language maintenance across three periods of arrival in New ... [more ▼]

This paper discusses the results of an exploratory study undertaken to investigate changes in individual and societal attitudes towards Dutch language maintenance across three periods of arrival in New Zealand from the 1950s to the present. Eleven representatives of Dutch families of three different periods of arrival in New Zealand completed a written questionnaire enquiring about their level of Dutch proficiency, patterns of language use, and their attitudes and perceptions of societal attitudes towards Dutch language maintenance in New Zealand in the past and present. An analysis of the resulting data suggests that although intergenerational language shift has so far occurred at a similar rate across periods of arrival, individual and societal attitudes towards Dutch language maintenance are more positive today than in the 1950s, and these changes in attitude may impact on the degree of Dutch language maintenance in New Zealand. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 71 (1 UL)