References of "Transportation Research. Part B, Methodological"
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See detailControllability of transportation networks
Rinaldi, Marco UL

in Transportation Research. Part B, Methodological (2018), 118

Network-wide traffic control policies determine the optimal values for the different kinds of controllers equipped on a transportation network, with the objective of reducing de- lays and congestion ... [more ▼]

Network-wide traffic control policies determine the optimal values for the different kinds of controllers equipped on a transportation network, with the objective of reducing de- lays and congestion, improving safety and reaching a target Level of Service. While models and algorithms for these problems have been extensively studied in literature, little at- tention has been devoted to investigating whether/how different locations, kinds (pricing controllers, traffic lights, ...) and amounts of controllers in a network affect the overall performance of network-wide schemes. In this work, we adapt the control-theoretical approach of controllability of complex networks to the specific instance of transportation networks, considering both propaga- tion/spillback dynamics and users’ behavior in terms of route choice. Thanks to the newly developed methodology, we then provide exact solutions to the Full Controllability Pric- ing Controller Location Problem for transportation networks. Comparing different pricing controller location policies through two artificial test cases, we empirically demonstrate how indeed the amount and kind of controllers in a network strongly affect the level of performance reachable by network-wide control policies, specifically in terms of Total Cost minimization. [less ▲]

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See detailIncorporating activity duration and scheduling utility into equilibrium-based Dynamic Traffic Assignment
Cantelmo, Guido UL; Viti, Francesco UL

in Transportation Research. Part B, Methodological (2018)

This paper deals with the problem of jointly modelling activity scheduling and duration within a Dynamic Traffic Assignment (DTA) problem framework. Although the last decades witnessed an intense effort ... [more ▼]

This paper deals with the problem of jointly modelling activity scheduling and duration within a Dynamic Traffic Assignment (DTA) problem framework. Although the last decades witnessed an intense effort in developing utility-based departure time choice models, relatively little has been done for understanding how the different assumptions on the utility model affect the model outputs. This problem is the main focus of this paper, which evaluates the effect of explicitly incorporating activity scheduling and duration within a generic user equilibrium DTA formulation. While using utility functions to model the positive component of the utility is a quite common procedure, the object of this paper is to show that a generic utility-based framework behaves as trip-based, activity-based, tour-based, or schedule-based if specific assumptions are specified. By establishing a set of properties, we quantify the amount of utility lost due to traffic congestion and how this affects activity (re-)scheduling and duration decisions. This allows predicting the effect of using a different assumption on the evolution of the transport system – and more specifically the departure time choice model. Conclusions support the idea that, under specific conditions, complex user behaviour can be approximated through a simplified model, and that the ratio between utility at origin and destination can be used to identify systematic biases within an existing DTA model – such as anticipating the rush hour. We also propose a novel utility function suited for modelling different activities, which can be used for modelling activities with a different duration. The mathematical model used to evaluate the effect of scheduling and duration into the equilibrium-based Dynamic Traffic Assignment is a simple bottleneck model. While this model has been recently re-formulated in order to capture the interaction between morning/evening commute, this paper further generalizes it in order to account for all type of activities. [less ▲]

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See detailEconomies of scale in recoverable robust maintenance location routing for rolling stock
Arts, Joachim UL; Tönissen, Denise

in Transportation Research. Part B, Methodological (2018), 117

We consider the problem of locating maintenance facilities in a railway setting. Different facility sizes can be chosen for each candidate location and for each size there is an associated annual facility ... [more ▼]

We consider the problem of locating maintenance facilities in a railway setting. Different facility sizes can be chosen for each candidate location and for each size there is an associated annual facility costs that can capture economies of scale in facility size. Because of the strategic nature of facility location, the opened facilities should be able to handle the current maintenance demand, but also the demand for any of the scenarios that can occur in the future. These scenarios capture changes such as changes to the line plan and the introduction of new rolling stock types. We allow recovery in the form of opening additional facilities, closing facilities, and increasing the facility size for each scenario. We provide a two-stage robust programming formulation. In the first-stage, we decide where to open what size of facility. In the second-stage, we solve a NP-hard maintenance location routing problem. We reformulate the problem as a mixed integer program that can be used to make an efficient column-and-constraint generation algorithm. To show that our algorithm works on practical sized instances, and to gain managerial insights, we perform a case study with instances from the Netherlands Railways. A counter intuitive insight is that economies of scale only play a limited role and that it is more important to reduce the transportation cost by building many small facilities, rather than a few large ones to profit from economies of scale. [less ▲]

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