References of "Timing & Time Perception"
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See detailAging and Time Perception for Short and Long Durations: A Question of Attention?
Lamotte, Mathilde UL; Droit-Volet, Sylvie

in Timing & Time Perception (2017), 5(2), 149-167

This study examined the difference in the perception of time between young and older adults in a temporal bisection task with four different duration ranges from a few milliseconds (500 ms) to several ... [more ▼]

This study examined the difference in the perception of time between young and older adults in a temporal bisection task with four different duration ranges from a few milliseconds (500 ms) to several seconds (30 s). In addition, individual cognitive capacities (short-term memory, working memory, processing speed, attention) were assessed with different neuropsychological tests. The results showed a general effect of age on the variability of time judgment, indicating a lower sensitivity to time in the old than in the younger adults, regardless of the duration range tested. In addition, the results showed that the individual differences in time sensitivity were explained by attention capacities, which decline with aging. [less ▲]

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See detailMetacognitive Questionnaire on Time : Feeling of the passage of time
Lamotte, Mathilde UL; Chakroun, Nadia; Droit-Volet, Sylvie et al

in Timing & Time Perception (2014), 2(3), 339-359

The aim of our studies was to design a Metacognitive Questionnaire on Time (MQT) that assesses inter-individual variations in the awareness of factors affecting the experience of the passage of time. In ... [more ▼]

The aim of our studies was to design a Metacognitive Questionnaire on Time (MQT) that assesses inter-individual variations in the awareness of factors affecting the experience of the passage of time. In the first study, 532 youngadultswere askedto reply to an initialquestionnaire consistingof 106questions relating to many different factors (e.g., psychostimulant, body temperature, age, attention) that could affect howtime is perceived. Factorial analyses allowed us to extract two discriminant factors, one relating to attention and the other to emotion. The second study sought to validate the final 24-item questionnaire by gathering data from 212 university students. Confirmatory Factorial Analyses (AMOS) showed that the MQT has the same two-factor structure. The third study assessed the construct validity of the MQT by measuring the correlation between theMQT scores and the scores with other questionnaires measuring close or different constructs. In sum, these studies enabled us to develop an easy-to-use questionnairewhereby it is possible to distinguish between individuals according to their subjective feeling of the passage of time. In addition, the participants’ responses on the MQT showed that they were more aware of attention-related factors than of emotion-related factors that might produce time distortions, and thatwomenwere more aware of their own temporal distortions than men. [less ▲]

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See detailTime, Emotion and the Embodiment of Timing
Droit-Volet, Sylvie; Fayolle, Sophie; Lamotte, Mathilde UL et al

in Timing & Time Perception (2013), 1(1), 99-126

The past few decades have seen an explosion in studies exploring the effects of emotion on time judgments. The aim of this review is to describe the results of these studies and to look at how they try to ... [more ▼]

The past few decades have seen an explosion in studies exploring the effects of emotion on time judgments. The aim of this review is to describe the results of these studies and to look at how they try to explain the time distortions produced by emotion. We begin by examining the findings on time judgments in affective disorders, which allow us to make a clear distinction between the feelings of time distortion that originate from introspection onto subjective personal experience, and the effects of emotion on the basic mechanisms involved in time perception. We then report the results of behavioral studies that have tested the effects of emotions on time perceptions and the temporal processing of different emotional stimuli (e.g. facial expressions, affective pictures or sounds). Finally, we describe our own studies of the embodiment of timing.Overall, the different results on time and emotion suggest that temporal distortions are an indicator of how our brain and body adapt to the dynamic structure of our environment. [less ▲]

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