References of "Scandinavian Journal of Economics"
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See detailTrading Goods or Human Capital: The Gains and Losses from Economic Integration
Burzynski, Michal UL

in Scandinavian Journal of Economics (2018), 120(2), 503-536

In this paper, I quantify the economic consequences of liberalizing migration in the OECD and compare them with those of a hypothetical liberalization of trade across the OECD. First, I investigate the ... [more ▼]

In this paper, I quantify the economic consequences of liberalizing migration in the OECD and compare them with those of a hypothetical liberalization of trade across the OECD. First, I investigate the bilateral migration and trade agreements between the EU and Australia, Canada, Japan, Turkey, and the US. Second, I show that the overall impact of reducing all legal restrictions on migration in the OECD is moderate (1.6 percent in real GDP), while the gains from removing tariff and non-tariff barriers to trade among all of the OECD economies are slightly lower (1.1 percent in real GDP). Finally, both the theoretical and numerical findings suggest that the direction of relationships between trade and migration (either substitutability or complementarity) depends on the type of shock imposed in the system. [less ▲]

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See detailAggregate Fluctuations and International Migration
Beine, Michel UL; Bricongne, Jean-Charles; Bourgeon, Pauline

in Scandinavian Journal of Economics (2017)

Traditional theories of integration such as the optimum currency area approach attribute a prominent role to international labour mobility in coping with relative economic fluctuations between countries ... [more ▼]

Traditional theories of integration such as the optimum currency area approach attribute a prominent role to international labour mobility in coping with relative economic fluctuations between countries. However, recent studies on international migration have overlooked the role of short-run factors such as business cycles or changes in employment rates in explaining international migration flows. This paper aims to fill that gap. We first derive a model of optimal migration choice based on an extension of the traditional Random Utility Model. Our model predicts that an improvement in the economic activity in a potential destination country relative to any origin country may trigger some additional migration flows on top of the impact exerted by long-run factors such as the wage differential or the bilateral distance. Compiling a dataset with annual gross migration flows between most developed countries over the 1980-2010 period, we empirically test the magnitude of the effect of these short-run factors on bilateral flows. Our econometric results indicate that aggregate fluctuations and employment rates affect the intensity of bilateral migration flows. We also provide compelling evidence that the Schengen agreement and the introduction of the euro significantly raised the international mobility of workers between the member countries. [less ▲]

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See detailEfficiency gains from liberalizing labor mobility
Machado Carneiro, Joël UL; Docquier, Frédéric; Sekkat, Khalid

in Scandinavian Journal of Economics (2015), 117(2), 303-346

In this paper, we quantify the effect of a complete liberalization of cross-border migration on the world GDP and its distribution across regions. We build a general equilibrium model, endogenizing ... [more ▼]

In this paper, we quantify the effect of a complete liberalization of cross-border migration on the world GDP and its distribution across regions. We build a general equilibrium model, endogenizing bilateral migration and income disparities between and within countries. Our calibration strategy uses data on effective and potential migration to identify total migration costs and visa costs by education level. Data on potential migration reveal that the number of people in the world who have a desire to migrate is around 400 million. This number is much smaller than that predicted in previous studies, and reflects the existence of high “incompressible” migration costs. In our benchmark framework, liberalizing migration increases the world GDP by 11.5–12.5 percent in the medium term. Our robustness analysis reveals that the gains are always limited, in the range of 7.0 percent (with schooling externalities) to 17.9 percent (if network effects are accounted for). [less ▲]

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See detailClimatic Factors as Determinants of International Migration
Beine, Michel UL; Parsons, Christopher

in Scandinavian Journal of Economics (2015), 117(2), 723-767

We examine natural disasters and long-run climatic factors as potential determinants of international migration, implementing a panel dataset of bilateral migration flows, 1960- 2000. We find no direct ... [more ▼]

We examine natural disasters and long-run climatic factors as potential determinants of international migration, implementing a panel dataset of bilateral migration flows, 1960- 2000. We find no direct impact of long-run climatic factors on international migration across our entire sample. These results are robust when conditioning on origin country characteristics and when considering migrants returning home and the potential endogeneity of migrant networks. Rather we find evidence of indirect effects of environmental factors operating through wages. We find that epidemics and miscellaneous incidents spur international migration and strong evidence that natural disasters beget greater flows of migrants to urban environs. [less ▲]

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See detailIs a Policy of Free Movemet of Workers Sustainable?
Picard, Pierre M UL; Worrall, Tim

in Scandinavian Journal of Economics (2015)

This paper studies the costs and benefits of the adoption of the policy of free movement for workers. For the countries to agree on uncontrolled movement of workers, the short run costs must be outweighed ... [more ▼]

This paper studies the costs and benefits of the adoption of the policy of free movement for workers. For the countries to agree on uncontrolled movement of workers, the short run costs must be outweighed by the long term benefits that result from better labor market flexibility and income smoothing. We show that such policies are less likely to be adopted when workers are impatient and less risk averse workers, when production technologies display decreasing returns and when countries trade a share of their products. [less ▲]

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See detailProperty Rights, Public Enforcement, and Growth
Irmen, Andreas UL; Kuehnel, Johanna

in Scandinavian Journal of Economics (2014), 116

We study the link between public enforcement of property rights, innovation investments, and economic growth in an endogenous growth framework with an expanding set of product varieties. We find that a ... [more ▼]

We study the link between public enforcement of property rights, innovation investments, and economic growth in an endogenous growth framework with an expanding set of product varieties. We find that a government may assure positive equilibrium growth through public employment in the enforcement of property rights, if the economic environment is sufficiently favorable to growth and/or public enforcement is sufficiently effective. However, in terms of welfare an equilibrium path without property rights protection and growth might be preferable. In this case the enforcement of property rights involves too much reallocation of labor from production and research towards the public sector. [less ▲]

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See detailNetwork Effect in International Migration: Does Education Matter More than Gender?
Beine, Michel UL; Salomone, Sara

in Scandinavian Journal of Economics (2013), 115(2), 354-380

In this paper, we analyze the impact that networks have on the structure of international migration flows. In particular, we investigate whether diaspora externalities are different across education ... [more ▼]

In this paper, we analyze the impact that networks have on the structure of international migration flows. In particular, we investigate whether diaspora externalities are different across education levels and gender. Using new data that include both dimensions, we analyze the respective impact that networks have on the proportion of each category of migrant. Therefore, in contrast to the preceding body of literature on the macro determinants of international migration, we can identify the factors that influence the selection in terms of skills and in terms of gender. We find that network effects vary by education level, but not by gender. [less ▲]

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See detailEXPLORING THE LINK BETWEEN LOCAL AND GLOBAL KNOWLEDGE SPILLOVERS: Evidence from Plant-Level Data
Barrios, Salvador; Bertinelli, Luisito UL; Heinen, Andreas UL et al

in Scandinavian Journal of Economics (2012)

We investigate the existence of local (i.e. within-country) and global (i.e. between-country) knowledge spillovers within a single analytical framework. Our analysis is based on an exhaustive database on ... [more ▼]

We investigate the existence of local (i.e. within-country) and global (i.e. between-country) knowledge spillovers within a single analytical framework. Our analysis is based on an exhaustive database on Irish manufacturing plants covering the period 1986-1994 and focuses on the impact of R\&D spillovers on productivity. Our results show that while the R\&D undertaken by multinationals active in Ireland has had no significant impact on local plants’ productivity, these multinationals have, nevertheless, through their presence, favoured the diffusion of global R\&D spillovers. We furthermore show that while domestic plants benefited from R\&D spillovers emanating from other domestic firms, these spillovers had a much more limited spatial scope compared to multinational-presence induced spillovers. Foreign affiliates in turn, have directly gained from the size of the R\&D stock in their origin country, but there is no evidence that foreign affiliates located in Ireland had benefited from local R\&D spillovers. [less ▲]

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See detailCES production functions and economic growth
Klump, Rainer UL; Preissler, H.

in Scandinavian Journal of Economics (2000), 102(1), 41-56

We examine inconsistencies and controversies related to the use of CES production functions in growth models. First, we show that not all variants of CES functions commonly used are consistently specified ... [more ▼]

We examine inconsistencies and controversies related to the use of CES production functions in growth models. First, we show that not all variants of CES functions commonly used are consistently specified. Second, using a simple growth model, we find that a higher elasticity of substitution leads to a higher steady state and makes the emergence of permanent growth more probable. It is also pointed out that the effect of a higher elasticity of substitution on the speed of convergence depends on the relative scarcity of the factors of production. Finally, we discuss possible explanations of variations in the elasticity of substitution. [less ▲]

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