References of "Psychoneuroendocrinology"
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See detailAcute stress influences the discrimination of complex scenes and complex faces in young healthy men
Paul, Marcus; Lech, Robert, K.; Scheil, Juliane et al

in Psychoneuroendocrinology (2016), 66

The stress-induced release of glucocorticoids has been demonstrated to influence hippocampal functions via the modulation of specific receptors. At the behavioral level stress is known to influence ... [more ▼]

The stress-induced release of glucocorticoids has been demonstrated to influence hippocampal functions via the modulation of specific receptors. At the behavioral level stress is known to influence hippocampus dependent long-term memory. In recent years, studies have consistently associated the hippocampus with the non-mnemonic perception of scenes, while adjacent regions in the medial temporal lobe were associated with the perception of objects, and faces. So far it is not known whether and how stress influences non-mnemonic perceptual processes. In a behavioral study, fifty male participants were subjected either to the stressful socially evaluated cold-pressor test or to a non-stressful control procedure, before they completed a visual discrimination task, comprising scenes and faces. The complexity of the face and scene stimuli was manipulated in easy and difficult conditions. A significant three way interaction between stress, stimulus type and complexity was found. Stressed participants tended to commit more errors in the complex scenes condition. For complex faces a descriptive tendency in the opposite direction (fewer errors under stress) was observed. As a result the difference between the number of errors for scenes and errors for faces was significantly larger in the stress group. These results indicate that, beyond the effects of stress on long-term memory, stress influences the discrimination of spatial information, especially when the perception is characterized by a high complexity. [less ▲]

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See detailCortisol, but not intranasal insulin, affects the central processing of visual food cues
Ferreira de Sá, D. S.; Schulz, André UL; Streit, F. et al

in Psychoneuroendocrinology (2014), 50(C), 311-320

Stress glucocorticoids and insulin are important endocrine regulators of energy homeostasis, but little is known about their central interaction on the reward-related processing of food cues. According to ... [more ▼]

Stress glucocorticoids and insulin are important endocrine regulators of energy homeostasis, but little is known about their central interaction on the reward-related processing of food cues. According to a balanced group design, healthy food deprived men received either 40 IU intranasal insulin (n=13), 30 mg oral cortisol (n=12), both (n=15), or placebo (n=14). Acoustic startle responsiveness was assessed during presentation of food and non-food pictures. Cortisol enhanced startle responsiveness during visual presentation of "high glycemic" food, but not during presentation of neutral and pleasant non-food pictures. Insulin had no effect. Based on the "frustrative non-reward" model these results suggest that the reward value of high glycemic food items is specifically increased by cortisol. [less ▲]

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See detailCortisol rapidly affects amplitudes of heartbeat-evoked brain potentials - Implications for the contribution of stress to an altered perception of physical sensations?
Schulz, André UL; Strelzyk, F.; Ferreira de Sá, D. S. et al

in Psychoneuroendocrinology (2013), 38(11), 2691-2698

Little is known about the impact of stress and stress hormones on the processing of visceral-afferent signals. Clinical data suggest that cortisol may lower the threshold for interoceptive stimuli, while ... [more ▼]

Little is known about the impact of stress and stress hormones on the processing of visceral-afferent signals. Clinical data suggest that cortisol may lower the threshold for interoceptive stimuli, while a pharmacological administration of cortisol decreases the sensitivity for physical symptoms. To clarify the role of cortisol for the processing of interoceptive signals, we investigated 16 healthy men on two occasions, once during the infusion of 4mg of cortisol and once during the infusion of a placebo substance. Heartbeat-evoked potentials (HEP; derived from resting EEG and ECG, during open and closed eyes), which are psychophysiological indicators for the cortical processing of cardioceptive signals, were measured over 6-min periods once before, and four times after the infusion (1-7, 11-17, 21-27 and 31-37min). We found that HEP amplitudes were higher during open than during closed eyes between 1 and 17min after cortisol infusion. There was no effect of cortisol on heart rate. We conclude that cortisol may rapidly modulate the cortical processing of cardioceptive neural signals. These results may have relevance for the effects of stress on the development and maintenance of psychosomatic symptoms. [less ▲]

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See detailStress response and humoral immune system alterations related to chronic hypergravity in mice
Gueguinou, Nathan UL; Bojados, Mickael; Jamon, Marc et al

in Psychoneuroendocrinology (2012), 37(1), 137-147

Spaceflights are known to induce stress and immune dysregulation. Centrifugation, as hindlimb unloading, is a good ground based-model to simulate altered gravity which occurs during space missions. The ... [more ▼]

Spaceflights are known to induce stress and immune dysregulation. Centrifugation, as hindlimb unloading, is a good ground based-model to simulate altered gravity which occurs during space missions. The aim of this study was to investigate the consequences of a long-term exposure to different levels of hypergravity on the stress response and the humoral immunity in a mouse model. For this purpose, adult C57Bl/6J male mice were subjected for 21 days either to control conditions or to 2G or 3G acceleration gravity forces. Corticosterone level and anxiety behavior revealed a stress response which was associated with a decrease of body weight, after 21-day of centrifugation at 3G but not at 2G. Spleen lymphocyte lipopolysaccharide (LPS) responsiveness was diminished by 40% in the 2G group only, whereas a decrease was noted when cells were stimulated with concanavalin A for both 2G and 3G groups (about 25% and 20%, respectively) compared to controls. Pro-inflammatory chemokines (MCP-1 and IP-10) and Th1 cytokines (IFNγ and IL2) were slightly decreased in the 2G group and strongly decreased in the 3G mouse group. Regarding Th2 cytokines (IL4, IL5) no further significant modification was observed, whereas the immunosuppressive cytokine IL10 was slightly increased in the 3G mice. Finally, serum IgG concentration was twice higher whereas IgA concentration was slightly increased (about 30%) and IgM were unchanged in 2G mice compared to controls. No difference was observed in the 3G group with these isotypes. Consequently, functional immune dysregulations and stress responses were dependent of the gravity level. [less ▲]

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See detailEvidence for an asociation betwen an enhanced reactivity of interleukin-6 levels and reduced glucocorticoid sensitivity in patients with fibromyalgia
Geiss, Andrea; Rohleder, Nicolas; Anton, Fernand UL

in Psychoneuroendocrinology (2012), 37(5), 671-684

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See detailCortisol rapidly disrupts prepulse inhibition in healthy men
Richter, S.; Schulz, André UL; Zech, C. M. et al

in Psychoneuroendocrinology (2011), 36(1), 109-114

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See detailDifferential expression of glucocorticoid receptor transcripts in major depressive disorder is not epigenetically programmed
Alt, Simone UL; Turner, Jonathan D.; Klok, Melanie D. et al

in Psychoneuroendocrinology (2010), 35(4), 544-56

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See detailPost-learning intranasal oxytocin modulates human memory for facial identity
Savaskan, E.; Ehrhardt, R.; Schulz, André UL et al

in Psychoneuroendocrinology (2008), 33(3), 368-374

Detailed reference viewed: 59 (0 UL)