References of "Psychological Test and Assessment Modeling"
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See detailA primer on relative weights analysis. Illustrations of its utility for management researchers
Stadler, Matthias UL; Cooper-Thomas, Helena D.; Greiff, Samuel UL

in Psychological Test and Assessment Modeling (2017)

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See detailSpecial Issue: Current Methodological Issues in Educational Large-Scale Assessments – Part I
Stadler, Matthias UL; Krolak-Schwerdt, Sabine UL; Greiff, Samuel UL

in Psychological Test and Assessment Modeling (2016), 58

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See detailThe systematic variation of task characteristics facilitates the understanding of task difficulty: A cognitive diagnostic modeling approach to complex problem solving
Greiff, Samuel UL; Krkovic, Katarina UL; Nagy, Gabriel

in Psychological Test and Assessment Modeling (2014), 56(1), 83-103

Since the 1960ies, when pioneering research on Item Response Theory (IRT) was published, considerable progress has been made with regard to the psychometrical quality of psychological assessment tools ... [more ▼]

Since the 1960ies, when pioneering research on Item Response Theory (IRT) was published, considerable progress has been made with regard to the psychometrical quality of psychological assessment tools. One recent development building upon IRT is the introduction of Cognitive Diagnostic Modeling (CDM). The major goal of introducing CDM was to develop methods that allow for examining which cognitive processes are involved when a person is working on a specific assessment task. More precisely, CDM enables researchers to investigate whether assumed task characteristics drive item difficulty and, thus, person ability parameters. This may – at least according to the assumption inherent in CDM - allow conclusions about cognitive processes involved in assessment tasks. In this study, out of the numerous CDMs available the Least Square Distance Method (LSDM; Dimitrov, 2012) was applied to investigate psychometrical qualities of an assessment instrument measuring Complex Problem Solving (CPS) skills. For the purpose of the study, two task characteristics essential for mastering CPS tasks were identified ex-ante – degree of connectivity and presence of indirect effects by adding eigendynamics to the task. The study examined whether and how the two hypothesized task characteristics drive item difficulty of two CPS dimensions, knowledge acquisition and knowledge application. The sample consisted of 490 German high school students, who completed the computer-based CPS assessment instrument MicroDYN. The two task characteristics in MicroDYN items were varied systematically. Results obtained in LSDM indicated that the two hypothesized task characteristics, degree of connectivity and introducing indirect effects, drove item difficulty only for knowledge acquisition. Hence, other task characteristics that may determine item difficulty of knowledge application need to be investigated in future studies in order to provide a sound measurement of CPS. [less ▲]

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See detailThe Genetics Lab. Acceptance and psychometric characteristics of a computer-based microworld to assess Complex Problem Solving
Sonnleitner, Philipp UL; Brunner, Martin; Greiff, Samuel UL et al

in Psychological Test and Assessment Modeling (2012), 54

Computer-based problem solving scenarios or “microworlds” are contemporary assessment instruments frequently used to assess students’ complex problem solving behavior – a key aspect of today’s educational ... [more ▼]

Computer-based problem solving scenarios or “microworlds” are contemporary assessment instruments frequently used to assess students’ complex problem solving behavior – a key aspect of today’s educational curricula and assessment frameworks. Surprisingly, almost nothing is known about their (1) acceptance or (2) psychometric characteristics in student populations. This article introduces the Genetics Lab (GL), a newly developed microworld, and addresses this lack of empirical data in two studies. Findings from Study 1, with a sample of 61 ninth graders, show that acceptance of the GL was high and that the internal consistencies of the scores obtained were satisfactory. In addition, meaningful intercorrelations between the scores supported the instrument’s construct validity. Study 2 drew on data from 79 ninth graders in differing school types. Large to medium correlations with figural and numerical reasoning scores provided evidence for the instrument’s construct validity. In terms of external validity, substantial correlations were found between academic performance and scores on the GL, most of which were higher than those observed between academic performance and the reasoning scales administered. In sum, this research closes an important empirical gap by (1) proving acceptance of the GL and (2) demonstrating satisfactory psychometric properties of its scores in student populations. [less ▲]

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