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See detailOf larks and hearts – morningness/eveningness, heart rate variability and cardiovascular stress response at different times of the day
Roeser, Karolin; Obergfell, Friederike; Meule, Adrian et al

in Physiology & Behavior (2012), 106 (2)

Inter-individual differences in the circadian period of physical and mental functions can be described on the dimension of morningness/eveningness. Previous findings support the assumption that ... [more ▼]

Inter-individual differences in the circadian period of physical and mental functions can be described on the dimension of morningness/eveningness. Previous findings support the assumption that eveningness is related to greater impulsivity and susceptibility to stress than morningness. Heart rate variability (HRV) serves as a physiological correlate of self- and emotional regulation and has not yet been investigated in relation to chronotypes. The study explores differences in HRV and other cardiovascular measures in morning- and evening-types at rest and under stress at different times of day (8-11 a.m. or 4-7 p.m.). Students (N = 471) were screened for chronotype and n = 55 females (27 morning- and 28 evening-types) were recruited for testing. These participants performed a mental arithmetic task while heart rate (HR) and blood pressure (BP) were recorded. Spectral components and a time-domain measure of HRV were calculated on HR data from resting and mental stress periods. Evening-types had significantly higher HR and systolic BP, but lower HRV than morning-types both at baseline and during stress. Stress induced in the evening had a significantly stronger impact on absolute and baseline corrected physiological measures in both chronotypes. The interaction of chronotype and testing time did not reach the level of significance for any of the dependent variables. The enhanced physiological arousal in evening-types might contribute to increased vulnerability to psychological distress. Hence, previous behavioral findings are supported by the physiological data of this study. [less ▲]

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See detailPsychophysiological responses to idiosyncratic stress in Bulimia Nervosa and Binge Eating Disorder.
Hilbert, Anja; Vögele, Claus UL; Tuschen-Caffier, Brunna et al

in Physiology & Behavior (2011), 104

This study examined psychophysiological stress responses to idiosyncratically relevant stress in bulimia nervosa (BN) and binge eating disorder (BED), in relation to autonomic cardiac control and ... [more ▼]

This study examined psychophysiological stress responses to idiosyncratically relevant stress in bulimia nervosa (BN) and binge eating disorder (BED), in relation to autonomic cardiac control and nutritional status. A total of 81 women with BN, BED and healthy controls (HC) took part in an in sensu exposure to idiosyncratic stress. Psychological and peripheral physiological parameters were measured, and tonic heart rate variability, nutritional status, and types of stress were determined. In response to stress exposure, both eating disordered groups showed a stronger reactivity of sadness, and the BED group showed a stronger reactivity of insecurity than the HC group. Desire to binge was increased in the context of interpersonal stress. Stress exposure led to increased cardiovascular activity and reduced electrodermal activity that did not differ by group. The BN-specific symptomatology moderated the association between autonomic cardiac control and psychophysiological stress responses. The results suggest common and specific psychophysiological processes in symptom maintenance through life stress in BN and BED. [less ▲]

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See detailCardiopulmonary baroreceptors affect reflexive startle eye blink
Richter, S.; Schulz, André UL; Port, J. et al

in Physiology & Behavior (2009), 98(5), 587-593

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See detailDietary restriction, cardiac autonomic regulation and stress reactivity in bulimic women
Vögele, Claus UL; Hilbert, Anja; Tuschen-Caffier, Brunna

in Physiology & Behavior (2009), 98

Recent !ndings suggest sympathetic inhibition during dietary restriction as opposed to increased sympathetic activity during re-feeding. The present study investigated cardiac autonomic regulation and ... [more ▼]

Recent !ndings suggest sympathetic inhibition during dietary restriction as opposed to increased sympathetic activity during re-feeding. The present study investigated cardiac autonomic regulation and stress reactivity in relation to biochemical markers of dietary restriction status in women diagnosed with bulimia nervosa. We predicted that bulimic individuals (BN) with a biochemical pro!le indicating dietary restriction exhibit reduced cardiac sympathetic and/or increased vagal activity. We also hypothesized, that BN with a biochemical pro!le within a normal range (i.e. currently not dieting or malnourished) would show heart rate variability responses (HRV) and reactivity to mental stress indicating increased sympathetic activation compared with non-eating disordered controls. Seventeen female volunteers diagnosed with bulimia nervosa were categorized according to their serum pro!le (glucose, pre-albumin, IGF-1, TSH, leptin) into currently fasting versus non-fasting and compared with 16 non-eating disordered controls matched for age and BMI. Spectral components of HRV were calculated on heart rate data from resting and mental stress periods (standardized achievement challenge) using autoregressive analysis. Compared to non-fasting BN and controls, fasting BN showed increased vagal and decreased sympathetic modulation during both resting and recovery periods. Cardiac autonomic regulation was not impaired in response to mental challenge. No differences could be found between non-fasting BN and controls. The results con!rm the notion of cardiac sympathetic inhibition and vagal dominance during dietary restriction and suggest the speci!city of starvation related biochemical changes for cardiac autonomic control. The results are discussed in terms of the higher incidence in cardiac complications in these patients. [less ▲]

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