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See detailPeriphilin is a novel interactor of synphilin-1, a protein implicated in Parkinson's disease.
Soehn, Anne S.; Franck, Thomas; Biskup, Saskia et al

in Neurogenetics (2010), 11(2), 203-15

Parkinson's disease (PD) is a common neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the loss of dopaminergic neurons and the presence of Lewy bodies. Alpha-synuclein and its interactor synphilin-1 are major ... [more ▼]

Parkinson's disease (PD) is a common neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the loss of dopaminergic neurons and the presence of Lewy bodies. Alpha-synuclein and its interactor synphilin-1 are major components of these inclusions. Rare mutations in the alpha-synuclein and synphilin-1 genes have been implicated in the pathogenesis of PD; however, the normal function of these proteins is far from being completely elucidated. We, thus, searched for novel synphilin-1-interacting proteins and deciphered periphilin as new interactor. Periphilin isoforms are involved in multiple cellular functions in vivo, and the protein is broadly expressed during embryogenesis and in the adult brain. We show that periphilin displays an overlapping expression pattern with synphilin-1 in cellular and animal models and in Lewy bodies of PD patients. Functional studies demonstrate that periphilin, as previously shown for synphilin-1, displays an antiapoptotic function by reducing caspase-3 activity. Searching for mutations in the periphilin gene, we detected a K69E substitution in two patients of a PD family. Taken together, these findings support for the first time an involvement of periphilin in PD. [less ▲]

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See detailTransgenic overexpression of the alpha-synuclein interacting protein synphilin-1 leads to behavioral and neuropathological alterations in mice.
Nuber, Silke; Franck, Thomas; Wolburg, Hartwig et al

in Neurogenetics (2010), 11(1), 107-20

Synphilin-1 has been identified as an interacting protein of alpha-synuclein, Parkin, and LRRK2, proteins which are mutated in familial forms of Parkinson disease (PD). Subsequently, synphilin-1 has also ... [more ▼]

Synphilin-1 has been identified as an interacting protein of alpha-synuclein, Parkin, and LRRK2, proteins which are mutated in familial forms of Parkinson disease (PD). Subsequently, synphilin-1 has also been shown to be an intrinsic component of Lewy bodies in sporadic PD. In order to elucidate the role of synphilin-1 in the pathogenesis of PD, we generated transgenic mice overexpressing wild-type and mutant (R621C) synphilin-1 driven by a mouse prion protein promoter. Transgenic expression of both wild-type and the R621C variant synphilin-1 resulted in increased dopamine levels of the nigrostriatal system in 3-month-old mice. Furthermore, we found pathological ubiquitin-positive inclusions in cerebellar sections and dark-cell degeneration of Purkinje cells. Both transgenic mouse lines showed significant reduction of motor skill learning and motor performance. These findings suggest a pathological role of overexpressed synphilin-1 in vivo and will help to further elucidate the mechanisms of protein aggregation and neuronal cell death. [less ▲]

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See detailBiological effects of the PINK1 c.1366C>T mutation: implications in Parkinson disease pathogenesis.
Grünewald, Anne UL; Breedveld, Guido J.; Lohmann-Hedrich, Katja et al

in Neurogenetics (2007), 8(2), 103-9

PINK1 gene mutations are a cause of recessively inherited, early-onset Parkinson's disease. In some patients, a single heterozygous mutation has been identified, including the recurrent c.1366C>T ... [more ▼]

PINK1 gene mutations are a cause of recessively inherited, early-onset Parkinson's disease. In some patients, a single heterozygous mutation has been identified, including the recurrent c.1366C>T transition. The interpretation of this finding remains controversial. Furthermore, the c.1366C>T mutation is associated with lower levels of PINK1 transcript, raising the question of whether mRNA levels correlate with the clinical status. We sequenced genomic DNA and copy DNA (cDNA) from 20 subjects carrying the c.1366C>T mutation in the homozygous (n = 5) or heterozygous (n = 15) state. In 17 mutation carriers, messenger RNA (mRNA) was quantified by real-time PCR using four different assays (PINK1 exon 5-6 or exon 7-8 relative to control genes SDHA or YWHAZ). Genomic sequencing confirmed the presence and zygosity of PINK1 mutations. cDNA sequencing in heterozygous mutation carriers revealed a strong wild-type and a much weaker or almost absent mutant signal, whereas in the homozygous patients, only the mutant signal was detected. Homozygous and heterozygous carriers showed PINK1 mRNA levels relative to a reference gene in the range of 0.1-0.2 and 0.5-0.6, respectively, compared with values of 0.9-1.0 in mutation-negative individuals. Treatment of lymphoblasts from a heterozygous mutation carrier with cycloheximide markedly increased the mutant transcript signal. We conclude that the recurrent PINK1 c.1366C>T mutation exerts a major effect at the mRNA level (80-90% reduction), most likely via nonsense-mediated mRNA decay. The absence of correlation between PINK1 mRNA levels and clinical status in heterozygous mutation carriers suggests that other genetic or environmental factors play a role in determining the phenotypic variability associated with the c.1366C>T mutation. [less ▲]

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