References of "NeuroImage"
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See detailLead-DBS v2: Towards a comprehensive pipeline for deep brain stimulation imaging.
Horn, Andreas; Li, Ningfei; Dembek, Till A. et al

in NeuroImage (2018)

Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is a highly efficacious treatment option for movement disorders and a growing number of other indications are investigated in clinical trials. To ensure optimal treatment ... [more ▼]

Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is a highly efficacious treatment option for movement disorders and a growing number of other indications are investigated in clinical trials. To ensure optimal treatment outcome, exact electrode placement is required. Moreover, to analyze the relationship between electrode location and clinical results, a precise reconstruction of electrode placement is required, posing specific challenges to the field of neuroimaging. Since 2014 the open source toolbox Lead-DBS is available, which aims at facilitating this process. The tool has since become a popular platform for DBS imaging. With support of a broad community of researchers worldwide, methods have been continuously updated and complemented by new tools for tasks such as multispectral nonlinear registration, structural/functional connectivity analyses, brain shift correction, reconstruction of microelectrode recordings and orientation detection of segmented DBS leads. The rapid development and emergence of these methods in DBS data analysis require us to revisit and revise the pipelines introduced in the original methods publication. Here we demonstrate the updated DBS and connectome pipelines of Lead-DBS using a single patient example with state-of-the-art high-field imaging as well as a retrospective cohort of patients scanned in a typical clinical setting at 1.5T. Imaging data of the 3T example patient is co-registered using five algorithms and nonlinearly warped into template space using ten approaches for comparative purposes. After reconstruction of DBS electrodes (which is possible using three methods and a specific refinement tool), the volume of tissue activated is calculated for two DBS settings using four distinct models and various parameters. Finally, four whole-brain tractography algorithms are applied to the patient's preoperative diffusion MRI data and structural as well as functional connectivity between the stimulation volume and other brain areas are estimated using a total of eight approaches and datasets. In addition, we demonstrate impact of selected preprocessing strategies on the retrospective sample of 51 PD patients. We compare the amount of variance in clinical improvement that can be explained by the computer model depending on the method of choice. This work represents a multi-institutional collaborative effort to develop a comprehensive, open source pipeline for DBS imaging and connectomics, which has already empowered several studies, and may facilitate a variety of future studies in the field. [less ▲]

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See detailThe roles of "face" and "non-face" areas during individual face perception: Evidence by fmri adaptation in a brain-damaged prosopagnosic patient
Dricot, Laurence; Sorger, Bettina; Schiltz, Christine UL et al

in NeuroImage (2008), 40(1), 318-332

Two regions in the human occipito-temporal cortex respond preferentially to faces: 'the fusiform face area' ('FFA') and the 'occipital face area' ('OFA'). Whether these areas have a dominant or exclusive ... [more ▼]

Two regions in the human occipito-temporal cortex respond preferentially to faces: 'the fusiform face area' ('FFA') and the 'occipital face area' ('OFA'). Whether these areas have a dominant or exclusive role in face perception, or if sub-maximal responses in other visual areas such as the lateral occipital complex (LOC) are also involved, is currently debated. To shed light on this issue, we tested normal participants and PS, a well-known brain-damaged patient presenting a face-selective perception deficit (prosopagnosia) [Rossion, B., Caldara, R., Seghier, M., Schuller, A. M., Lazeyras, F., Mayer, E. (2003). A network of occipito-temporal face-sensitive areas besides the right middle fusiform gyrus is necessary for normal face processing. Brain 126 2381-2395.], with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Of particular interest, the right hemisphere lesion of the patient PS encompasses the 'OFA' but preserves the 'FFA' and LOC [Sorger, B., Goebel, R., Schiltz, C., Rossion, B. (2007). Understanding the functional neuroanatomy of acquired prosopagnosia. NeuroImage 35, 836-852.]. Using fMRI-adaptation, we found a dissociation between the coding of individual exemplars in the structurally intact 'FFA', which was impaired for faces but preserved for objects in the patient PS's brain. Most importantly, a larger response to different faces than repeated faces was found in the ventral part of the LOC both for normals and the patient, next to the right hemisphere lesion. Thus, following prosopagnosia, areas that do not respond preferentially to faces such as the ventral part of the LOC (vLOC) may still be recruited for compensatory or residual individual face perception. Overall, these observations indicate that several high-level visual areas in the human brain contribute to individual face perception. However, a subset of these areas in the right hemisphere, those responding preferentially to faces ('FFA' and 'OFA'), appear to be critical for this function. [less ▲]

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See detailUnderstanding the functional neuroanatomy of acquired prosopagnosia
Sorger, Bettina; Goebel, Rainer; Schiltz, Christine UL et al

in NeuroImage (2007), 35(2), 836-852

One of the most remarkable disorders following brain damage is prosopagnosia, the inability to recognize faces. While a number of cases of prosopagnosia have been described at the behavioral level, the ... [more ▼]

One of the most remarkable disorders following brain damage is prosopagnosia, the inability to recognize faces. While a number of cases of prosopagnosia have been described at the behavioral level, the functional neuroanatomy of this face recognition impairment, and thus the brain regions critically involved in normal face recognition, has never been specified in great detail. Here, we used anatomical and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to present the detailed functional neuroanatomy of a single case of acquired prosopagnosia (PS; Rossion, B., Caldara, R., Seghier, M., Schuller, A.-M., Lazeyras, F., Mayer, E., 2003a. A network of occipito-temporal face-sensitive areas besides the right middle fusiform gyrus is necessary for normal face processing. Brain 126, 2381-95; Rossion, B., Joyce, C.A., Cottrell, G.W., Tarr, M.J., 2003b. Early lateralization and orientation tuning for face, word, and object processing in the visual cortex. Neuroimage 20, 1609-24) with normal object recognition. First, we clarify the exact anatomical location and extent of PS' lesions in relation to (a) retinotopic cortex, (b) face-preferring regions, and (c) other classical visual regions. PS' main lesion - most likely causing her prosopagnosia - is localized in the posterior part of the right ventral occipitotemporal cortex. This lesion causes a left superior paracentral scotoma, as frequently observed in cases of prosopagnosia. While the borders of the early visual areas in the left hemisphere could be delineated well, the extensive posterior right-sided lesion hampered a full specification of the cortical representation of the left visual field. Using multiple scanning runs, face-preferring activation was detected within the right middle fusiform gyrus (MFG) in the so-called 'fusiform face area' ('FFA'), but also in the left inferior occipital gyrus (left 'OFA'), and in the right posterior superior temporal sulcus (STS). The dorsal part of the lateral occipital complex (LOC) and the human middle temporal cortex (hMT+/V5) were localized bilaterally. The color-preferring region V4/V8 was localized only in the left hemisphere. In the right hemisphere, the posterior lesion spared the ventral part of LOC, a region that may be critical for the preserved object recognition abilities of the patient, and the restriction of her deficit to the category of faces. The presumptive functions of both structurally damaged and preserved regions are discussed and new hypotheses regarding the impaired and preserved abilities of the patient during face and non-face object processing are derived. Fine-grained neurofunctional analyses of brain-damaged single cases with isolated recognition deficits may considerably improve our knowledge of the brain regions critically involved in specific visual functions, such as face recognition. [less ▲]

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See detailFaces are represented holistically in the human occipito-temporal cortex
Schiltz, Christine UL; Rossion, Bruno

in NeuroImage (2006), 32(3), 1385-1394

Two identical top parts of a face photograph look different if their bottom parts differ. This perceptual illusion, the "face composite effect", is taken as strong evidence that faces are processed as a ... [more ▼]

Two identical top parts of a face photograph look different if their bottom parts differ. This perceptual illusion, the "face composite effect", is taken as strong evidence that faces are processed as a whole rather than as a collection of independent features. To test the hypothesis that areas responding preferentially to faces in the human brain represent faces holistically, we recorded functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) during an adaptation paradigm with the composite face illusion. In both the middle fusiform gyrus (MFG) and the inferior occipital gyrus (IOG), we observed a significantly larger response to the same top face when it was aligned with different bottom parts than with the same bottom part, with a most robust effect in the right middle fusiform gyrus. This difference was not found when the top and the bottom face parts were spatially misaligned or when the faces were presented upside-down. These findings indicate that facial features are integrated into holistic face representations in areas of the human visual cortex responding preferentially to faces. [less ▲]

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See detailThe functionally defined right occipital and fusiform "face areas" discriminate novel from visually familiar faces
Rossion, Bruno; Schiltz, Christine UL; Crommelinck, Marc

in NeuroImage (2003), 19(3), 877-883

Neuroimaging (PET and fMRI) studies have identified a set of brain areas responding more to faces than to other object categories in the visual extrastriate cortex of humans. This network includes the ... [more ▼]

Neuroimaging (PET and fMRI) studies have identified a set of brain areas responding more to faces than to other object categories in the visual extrastriate cortex of humans. This network includes the middle lateral fusiform gyrus (the fusiform face area, or FFA) as well as the inferior occipital gyrus (occipital face area, OFA). The exact functions of these areas in face processing remain unclear although it has been argued that their primary function is to distinguish faces from nonface object categories-"face detection"-or also to discriminate among faces, irrespective of their visual familiarity to the observer. Here, we combined the data from two previous positron emission tomography (PET) studies to show that the functionally defined face areas are involved in the automatic discrimination between unfamiliar faces and familiar faces. Consistent with previous studies, a face localizer contrast (faces-objects) revealed bilateral activation in the middle lateral fusiform gyrus (FFA, BA37) and in the right inferior occipital cortex (OFA, BA19). Within all the regions of the right hemisphere, larger levels of activation were found for unfamiliar as compared to familiar faces. These results suggest that the very same areas involved in categorizing faces at the basic or individual level, play a role in differentiating familiar faces from new faces, showing an overlap between visual and presemantic mnesic representations of faces in the right hemisphere. [less ▲]

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See detailEffect of familiarity on the processing of human faces
Dubois, S; Rossion, B; Schiltz, Christine UL et al

in NeuroImage (1999), 9(3), 278289

Most brain imaging studies on face perception have investigated the processing of unknown faces and addressed mainly the question of specific face processing in the human brain. The goal of this study was ... [more ▼]

Most brain imaging studies on face perception have investigated the processing of unknown faces and addressed mainly the question of specific face processing in the human brain. The goal of this study was to highlight the effects of familiarity on the visual processing of faces. Using [15O]water 3D Positron Emission Tomography, regional cerebral blood flow distribution was measured in 11 human subjects performing an identical task (gender categorization) on both unknown and known faces. Subjects also performed two control tasks (a face recognition task and a visual pattern discrimination task). They were scanned after a training phase using videotapes during which they had been familiarized with and learned to recognize a set of faces. Two major results were obtained. On the one hand, we found bilateral activations of the fusiform gyri in the three face conditions, including the so-called fusiform-face area, a region in the right fusiform gyrus specifically devoted to face processing. This common activation suggests that different cognitive tasks performed on known and unknown faces require the involvement of this fusiform region. On the other hand, specific regional cerebral blood flow changes were related to the processing of known and unknown faces. The left amygdala, a structure involved in implicit learning of visual representations, was activated by the categorization task on unknown faces. The same task on known faces induced a relative decrease of activity in early visual areas. These differences between the two categorization tasks reveal that the human brain processes known and unknown faces differently. [less ▲]

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See detailNeuronal mechanisms of perceptual learning: Changes in human brain activity with training in orientation discrimination
Schiltz, Christine UL; Bodart, M. J; Dubois, S et al

in NeuroImage (1999), 9(1), 46-62

Using 15O-water 3D positron emission tomography, regional cerebral blood flow was measured twice in six human subjects: before and after extensive training in orientation discrimination. In each session ... [more ▼]

Using 15O-water 3D positron emission tomography, regional cerebral blood flow was measured twice in six human subjects: before and after extensive training in orientation discrimination. In each session subjects performed two orientation discrimination tasks, during which they discriminated the orientation of a grating at either the trained or untrained reference orientation, and a control task, during which they detected a randomly textured pattern. By comparing the discrimination to the detection tasks, we observed a main effect of task bilaterally in the posterior occipital cortex, extending into the left posterior fusiform gyrus and the right inferior occipital gyrus, bilaterally in the intraparietal sulcus, as well as in the cerebellum, thalamus, and brainstem. When we compared the activation pattern before and after the training period, all the changes observed were activity decreases. The nonspecific changes, which were not related to the orientation used during the training, were situated in the cerebellum and bilaterally in the extrastriate visual cortex. The orientation-specific changes, on the other hand, were restricted to the striate and extrastriate visual cortex, more precisely the right calcarine sulcus, the left lingual gyrus, the left middle occipital, and the right inferior occipital gyrus. These findings confirm our hypothesis concerning the existence of learning related changes at early levels of visual processing in human adults and suggest that mechanisms resulting in neuronal activity decreases might be involved in the present kind of learning. [less ▲]

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