References of "Language Policy"
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See detailHarmony as language policy in China: an Internet perspective
Wang, Xuan; Juffermans, Kasper UL; Du, Caixia

in Language Policy (2016), 15(3), 299-321

This paper provides an ethnographic understanding of harmony as language policy in China, grounded in a historical analysis of ‘harmony’ (和 he) as a distinct traditional Chinese (Confucian) ideal that ... [more ▼]

This paper provides an ethnographic understanding of harmony as language policy in China, grounded in a historical analysis of ‘harmony’ (和 he) as a distinct traditional Chinese (Confucian) ideal that gradually finds its new expressions through the policy of Harmonious Society (和谐社会 hexie shehui) in contemporary China. The paper focuses on language practices surrounding ‘harmony’ emerging from the Internet, a discursive space and site that is both highly diverse and heavily contested with respect to policing processes, and notably so in the context of the PRC for its stringent mea- surement of censorship and sensitization of language use. It is shown that although the state is arguably the strongest stakeholder in implementing the policy of harmony, the actual processes of harmonization online develop in detailed, multidirectional and unpredictable rather than abstract, linear or monofocal ways. The paper offers a descriptive analysis of the field of Internet memes that critique and subvert the policies of harmonization. This includes new meanings for words (e.g. ‘harmony’ as euphemism for censorship) and puns around the acoustic image of hexie and other censorable words, resulting in the circulation and bricolage of myths and songs revolving around ‘river crab’ (hexie) and ‘grass mud horse’ (caonima) as placeholders of dissent, which feed back into offline popular (and critical) culture. The paper concludes with a discussion of the politics of harmony, pointing at the increasingly polycentric realities clashing with the modernist monocentric ideal of the state project of harmony, and with arguments for an ethnographically based understanding and inspection of language policy as an instrument for shaping sociolinguistic life. [less ▲]

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See detailFree Your Stuff Luxembourg! Language policies, practices and ideologies in a multilingual Facebook group
De Bres, Julia UL; Belling, Luc UL

in Language Policy (2015), 14(4), 357-375

This article considers the dynamic relationship between language policies, practices and ideologies in a multilingual Facebook group in Luxembourg. The group under focus, ‘Free Your Stuff Luxembourg’, was ... [more ▼]

This article considers the dynamic relationship between language policies, practices and ideologies in a multilingual Facebook group in Luxembourg. The group under focus, ‘Free Your Stuff Luxembourg’, was created to facilitate the costfree exchange of consumer goods between members located in Luxembourg. The article traces the development of a language policy for a group that facilitates communication between people of diverse nationalities in an officially trilingual country, where French, German and Luxembourgish operate as administrative languages and English plays an increasingly important role. Part one analyses the development of the group’s official language policy by group administrators, showing progression from an implicitly English language policy to an explicitly multilingual policy, incorporating a strong place for Luxembourgish. Part two considers how the language practices of group members relate to this official language policy, using a quantitative analysis of the language(s) of group posts across three periods from February 2011 to April 2012. This analysis shows a shift from predominantly English language practices to a balance between English and Luxembourgish, and finally a dominance of Luxembourgish. Part three investigates a further influence on language policy development, the language ideologies of group administrators and members, as expressed in language ideological debates within the group. The results provide several insights in relation to language policies in the new media, addressing the role of new agents of language policy (group administrators) in regulating language use in this context, the processes by which individuals police each other’s language use online, and the extent to which language practices in online environments can be managed, if at all, through language policy activity. [less ▲]

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See detailLanguage policies on social network sites
De Bres, Julia UL

in Language Policy (2015)

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See detailIntroduction: Language policies on social network sites
De Bres, Julia UL

in Language Policy (2015), 14(4), 309-314

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See detailMultiliteracies and family language policy in an urban Inuit community
Patrick, D.; Budach, Gabriele UL; Muckpaloo, I.

in Language Policy (2013), 12(1), 47-62

This study investigates the intersection of family language policy with Indigenous multiliteracies and urban Indigeneity. It documents a grassroots Inuit literacy initiative in Ottawa, Canada and ... [more ▼]

This study investigates the intersection of family language policy with Indigenous multiliteracies and urban Indigeneity. It documents a grassroots Inuit literacy initiative in Ottawa, Canada and considers literacy practices among Inuit at a local Inuit educational centre, where maintaining connections between urban Inuit and their homeland linguistic and cultural practices is a central objective. Using data from a participatory, activity-oriented, ethnographic project at an Inuit family literacy centre, we argue that state-driven language policies have opened up spaces for Indigenous-defined language and literacy learning activities that can shape and be shaped by family language policies. This has permitted some urban groups in Canada to define their own literacy needs in order to develop effective family language policies. Drawing on two Inuit-centred literacy activities, we demonstrate how literacy practices are embedded in intergenerational sharing of Inuit experience, cultural memory, and stories and how these are associated spatially, culturally, and materially with objects and representations. We thus show how Inuit-centred literacy practices can be a driving force for family language policy, linking people to an urban Inuit educational community centre and to their urban and Arctic Inuit families and homelands. © 2012 Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht. [less ▲]

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See detailPromoting the Māori language to non-Māori: evaluating the New Zealand government’s approach
De Bres, Julia UL

in Language Policy (2011), (10), 361-376

New Zealand’s main government Māori language planning agencies, the Māori Language Commission and the Ministry of Māori Development, have engaged for some time in language planning targeting the attitudes ... [more ▼]

New Zealand’s main government Māori language planning agencies, the Māori Language Commission and the Ministry of Māori Development, have engaged for some time in language planning targeting the attitudes and behaviours of non-Māori New Zealanders. This activity is based on the belief that the attitudes and behaviours of majority language speakers exert an important influence on the health of minority languages. To date, there has been little evaluation of the effectiveness of this approach. This article examines the official policy and practice of the two agencies in this regard and evaluates their effectiveness, in terms of both internal factors and external responses. Based on this analysis, points for improvement and potentially effective future directions are discussed. [less ▲]

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See detailOrwellian doublethink: Keywords in Luxembourgish and European language-in-education policy discourses
Weber, Jean-Jacques UL; Horner, Kristine

in Language Policy (2010), 9(3), 241-256

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See detailRethinking diversity and difference in French language practices
Le Nevez, Adam UL

in Language Policy (2008), 7(4), 309-322

This paper contributes to a debate on linguistic identity and social participation in France by providing a critical reading of language policy and practice. It challenges the notion that France is a ... [more ▼]

This paper contributes to a debate on linguistic identity and social participation in France by providing a critical reading of language policy and practice. It challenges the notion that France is a linguistically homogenous nation where a standardised French language is universally practiced and, rather, seeks to reframe linguistic diversity and heterogeneity as fundamental and legitimate constitutive features of French society. In exploring diversity from this critical perspective, the paper looks to the ways in which a number of artists and language activists are deliberately and consciously transgressing normative notions of French to affirm the legitimacy of their alterity and difference. The paper does not make an argument against the legitimacy or social value of standard French, but rather argues in favour of a more critical and inclusive approach to cultural and linguistic difference in France. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 59 (1 UL)