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See detailPracticing (nature-based) tourism: Introduction
Olafsdottir, Gunnthora UL

in Landabréfið : Journal of the Association of Icelandic Geographers (2011), 25

Little is still known about human practices in nature or elsewhere in the context of tourism. There are however positive signs of change in this respect in the wake of the cultural and performance ‘turn’ ... [more ▼]

Little is still known about human practices in nature or elsewhere in the context of tourism. There are however positive signs of change in this respect in the wake of the cultural and performance ‘turn’ in academia. Phenomenological perspectives have emphasised investigation of the performative and hybrid aspects of living and moment-to-moment being and allows for deep scrutiny of human practices in the context of tourism. This paper discusses this change and its meaning for tourism studies as well as giving an overview of relevant literature that has made great contributions to this development. It then introduces this special issue of Landabréfið, which stems from the conference Practicing Nature-Based Tourism, which was held in Reykjavík, Iceland, on February 5-6, 2011. The papers in this issue provide different and insightful insights into how life is currently practiced in the context of (nature-based) tourism. [less ▲]

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See detailNatturutengsl og upplifanir ferdamanna a Islandi: Fjogur tengslamynstur vellidunar
Olafsdottir, Gunnthora UL

in Landabréfið : Journal of the Association of Icelandic Geographers (2008), (22), 51-76

This paper reports findings from an ethnographic study of the enchanting and healing affordances of ‘being-in-nature’. Two British-based organised tours to Iceland were under study. Deploying a conceptual ... [more ▼]

This paper reports findings from an ethnographic study of the enchanting and healing affordances of ‘being-in-nature’. Two British-based organised tours to Iceland were under study. Deploying a conceptual framework drawn from phenomenology and non-representational theory, the study engaged with the creative interaction between landscape, technology and the travelling body, and reports how walking and driving allowed certain yet different access and responses to nature as part of tourism, as dream, as affect, as ‘afterlife’. Findings show that therapeutic affects of being-in-nature were person-specific yet relational. They depended on nature’s performance and what the individual gave to the relations. The study identified that the therapeutic affect seems to be rooted in positive egocentric relations with nature when either celebrating personal abilities and situations, or having the freedom for unhindered movement and expression of feelings. Yet the most moving moments were based on relations with nature from an ecocentric ethical stance. Indeed there are indications that suggest deep connections between ethical mindfulness and human flourishing. [less ▲]

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