References of "International Journal of Solids and Structures"
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See detailMicromechanical model for sintering and damage in viscoelastic porous ice and snow. Part II: validation
Kabore, Brice Wendlassida UL; Peters, Bernhard UL

in International Journal of Solids and Structures (2019)

The last decades have witnessed sharp progress in both numerical simulation methods and computing power. Realistic simulation of complex structures such as snow remains challenging. The discrete particle ... [more ▼]

The last decades have witnessed sharp progress in both numerical simulation methods and computing power. Realistic simulation of complex structures such as snow remains challenging. The discrete particle approach now accessible due to advances in parallel processing has shown to be a good alternative for brittle and quasi-brittle materials. A novel numerical model has been described in part I of this study. Ice grains in snow are found near their melting points with an enhanced creep that constantly affects its microstructure. The behavior of snow combines characteristics of polycrystalline ice, which depends on stress rate, temperature, hydrostatic pressure and geometrical proprieties that affects its fracture properties. Snow can pass from porous continuous structure to a granular form or creep intensively when loaded. The herein proposed methodology includes time and pressure dependent bonding properties of ice and predicts large displacements, fracture, and granular flow in snow under the effect of mechanical stress. A micromechanical approach based on particle mechanics and beam theory is used to capture microstructure evolution under external loads. The calibration and validation are based on stress-strain data from some compression tests found in the literature. [less ▲]

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See detailMicromechanical model for sintering and damage in viscoelastic porous ice and snow. Part I: Model and calibration
Kabore, Brice Wendlassida UL; Peters, Bernhard UL

in International Journal of Solids and Structures (2019)

Ice and snow are usually classified as a viscoelastic or viscoplastic materials according to temperature, strain rate, pressure and time scale. Throughout experimental studies presented in the literature ... [more ▼]

Ice and snow are usually classified as a viscoelastic or viscoplastic materials according to temperature, strain rate, pressure and time scale. Throughout experimental studies presented in the literature, it has been observed that at very low temperatures or high strain rates, porous ice and snow exhibit brittle behavior, but experience high viscous and plastic flow at temperatures close to the melting point and low rates. At the macroscopic level, nonlinearity is not necessarily attributed to permanent changes in the material or yielding but mainly to micro cracks, intergranular sliding, porosity collapse and crack propagation. In this paper, this complex behavior is described with a full microstructure-based model. Classical rheological models and beam theory are used to describe aspects of creep and fracture of granular ice and snow. [less ▲]

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See detailA Phase field method for modeling stress corrosion crack propagation in a nickel base alloy
Nguyen, Thanh Tung UL; Bolivar, J.; Réthoré, J. et al

in International Journal of Solids and Structures (2017), 112

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See detailA variational formulation of dissipative quasicontinuum methods
Rokos, Ondrej; Beex, Lars UL; Peerlings, Ron et al

in International Journal of Solids and Structures (2016), 102-103

Lattice systems and discrete networks with dissipative interactions are successfully employed as meso-scale models of heterogeneous solids. As the application scale generally is much larger than that of ... [more ▼]

Lattice systems and discrete networks with dissipative interactions are successfully employed as meso-scale models of heterogeneous solids. As the application scale generally is much larger than that of the discrete links, physically relevant simulations are computationally expensive. The QuasiContinuum (QC) method is a multiscale approach that reduces the computational cost of direct numerical simulations by fully resolving complex phenomena only in regions of interest while coarsening elsewhere. In previous work (Beex et al., J. Mech. Phys. Solids 64, 154-169, 2014), the originally conservative QC methodology was generalized to a virtual-power-based QC approach that includes local dissipative mechanisms. In this contribution, the virtual-power-based QC method is reformulated from a variational point of view, by employing the energy-based variational framework for rate-independent processes (Mielke and Roub cek, Rate-Independent Systems: Theory and Application, Springer-Verlag, 2015). By construction it is shown that the QC method with dissipative interactions can be expressed as a minimization problem of a properly built energy potential, providing solutions equivalent to those of the virtual-power-based QC formulation. The theoretical considerations are demonstrated on three simple examples. For them we verify energy consistency, quantify relative errors in energies, and discuss errors in internal variables obtained for different meshes and two summation rules. [less ▲]

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See detailA discrete network model for bond failure and frictional sliding in fibrous materials
Wilbrink, David; Beex, Lars UL; Peerlings, Ron

in International Journal of Solids and Structures (2013), 50(9), 1354-1363

Discrete network models and lattice models using trusses or beams can be used to mechanically model fibrous materials, since the discrete elements represent the individual fibers or yarns at the mesoscale ... [more ▼]

Discrete network models and lattice models using trusses or beams can be used to mechanically model fibrous materials, since the discrete elements represent the individual fibers or yarns at the mesoscale of these materials. Consequently, local mesoscale phenomena, such as individual fiber failure and interfiber bond failure, can be incorporated. Only a few discrete network models in which bond failure is incorporated include frictional fiber sliding that occurs after bond failure has taken place, although this occurs in the mechanical behaviour of several fibrous materials. In this paper, a spring network model for interfiber bond failure and subsequent frictional fiber sliding is developed, which is formulated in a thermodynamical setting. The thermodynamical basis ensures that performed mechanical work is either stored in the network or dissipated due to bond failure and subsequent sliding. A numerical implementation of the framework is proposed in which the kinematic and internal variables are simultaneously solved, because the internal variables are directly coupled in the framework. Variations in network connectivity, bond strength, fiber length and anisotropy are implemented in the framework. The results show amongst others that the macroscopic yield point scales with the bond strength and that the macroscopic stiffness and the macroscopic yield point scale with the fiber length. The presented results also show that the macroscopic yield point becomes significantly less pronounced for an increase of the fiber length. [less ▲]

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See detailAn experimental and computational study of laminated paperboard creasing and folding
Beex, Lars UL; Ron, Peerlings

in International Journal of Solids and Structures (2009)

Laminated paperboard is often used as a packaging material for products such as toys, tea and frozenfoods. To make the paperboard packages appealing for consumers, the fold lines must be both neat and ... [more ▼]

Laminated paperboard is often used as a packaging material for products such as toys, tea and frozenfoods. To make the paperboard packages appealing for consumers, the fold lines must be both neat and undamaged. The quality of the folds depends on two converting processes: the manufacture of fold lines (creasing) and the subsequent folding. A good crease contains some delamination, initiated during creasing, to reduce the bending stiffness and to prevent the board from breaking during folding. However, for boards of high grammage breaking of the top layer is nevertheless a frequent problem. The mechanisms that operate in the creasing zone during creasing and folding, and that may thus result in breaking of the top layer, are studied in this contribution on the basis of idealized small-scale creasing and folding experiments. However, since experimental observations are only limited means to study the paperboard’s behavior, a mechanical model is proposed to obtain more detailed insight. Although the material and delamination descriptions used in the mechanical model are both relatively straightforward, comparisons between the model and the experimental data show that the model predicts the paperboard’s response well. The mechanical model shows – in combination with experimental strain fields – that multiple delaminations are initiated in the shear regions. Moreover, only the mechanical model reveals the mechanism that is responsible for the failure of the top layer if a crease is too shallow. Finally, the model also demonstrates that not only delamination but also plastic behavior must occur during creasing if breaking of the top layer is to be avoided. [less ▲]

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