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See detailVariants of early-onset restrictive eating disturbances in middle childhood
Kurz, Susanne; Van Dyck, Zoé UL; Dremmel, Daniela et al

in International Journal of Eating Disorders (2015), 49(1), 102-106

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See detailFamily structure, body mass index and eating behaviour
Hasenböhler, Kathrin; Munsch, Simone; Meyer, Andrea H. et al

in International Journal of Eating Disorders (2009), 42

Objective: To explore associations between family structure, children’s body mass index (BMI), and eating behaviors of children and their mothers. Method: Fifty-seven mothers and their children took part ... [more ▼]

Objective: To explore associations between family structure, children’s body mass index (BMI), and eating behaviors of children and their mothers. Method: Fifty-seven mothers and their children took part in an experimental study. BMI of children was measured. Mothers were asked to provide self- report data on sociodemographic back- ground, mental health, and eating behaviors about themselves and their children. Parent-child-dyads represented their family structure using the Family System Test. Results: We found negative associations in typical family situations between family hierarchy and children’s BMI, mothers’ emotional eating and mothers’ restrained eating. Family cohesion and restrained eating of the children were also negatively correlated. We obtained positive associa- tions in typical and conflict family situa- tions between family cohesion and external eating of the children. Discussion: We found indications that family structure is associated with overweight and with eating behavior in children and their mothers. VC 2008 by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. [less ▲]

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See detailPsychophysiological responses to food exposure: an experimental study in binge eaters
Vögele, Claus UL; Florin, Irmela

in International Journal of Eating Disorders (1997), (21), 147-157

Objective: The aim of the present study was to investigate psychophysiological responses to food exposure in binge eaters. Method: Thirty female volunteers reporting regular binge attacks were compared ... [more ▼]

Objective: The aim of the present study was to investigate psychophysiological responses to food exposure in binge eaters. Method: Thirty female volunteers reporting regular binge attacks were compared with 30 nonbinge eaters. Subjects attended individually for the single laboratory session. Continuous measures of heart rate (HR), blood pressure (BP), electroder- mal activity (EDA), and respiration rate were taken during rest and exposure to their favorite binge food. In addition, psychophysiological monitoring continued while subjects were al- lowed to eat after food exposure. Participants also completed inventories assessing restrained eating style (FEV, Revised Restraint Scale). Ratings of nervousness, distress, desire to binge, and hunger were collected repeatedly throughout the experiment. Results: The results indi- cate higher psychophysiological arousal in binge eaters than in nonbinge eaters. Binge eaters maintained a higher arousal level in BP and EDA throughout the food exposure trial than controls. HR during food exposure predicted the relative amount of food consumed during the eating trial across all subjects. This relationship, however, was more pronounced in binge eaters than controls and in restrained compared to unrestrained binge eaters. Discussion: The implications of these results are discussed in terms of conditioning and arousal models of cue reactivity in binge eating. © 1997 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Int J Eat Disord 21: 147–157, 1997. [less ▲]

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