References of "International Journal of Behavioral Development"
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See detailSensitivity to spacing information increases more for the eye region than for the mouth region during childhood
de Heering, Adélaïde; Schiltz, Christine UL

in International Journal of Behavioral Development (2013), 37(2), 169-174

Sensitivity to spacing information within faces improves with age and reaches maturity only at adolescence. In this study, we tested 6–16-year-old children’s sensitivity to vertical spacing when the eyes ... [more ▼]

Sensitivity to spacing information within faces improves with age and reaches maturity only at adolescence. In this study, we tested 6–16-year-old children’s sensitivity to vertical spacing when the eyes or the mouth is the facial feature selectively manipulated. Despite the similar discriminability of these manipulations when they are embedded in inverted faces (Experiment 1), children’s sensitivity to spacing information manipulated in upright faces improved with age only when the eye region was concerned (Experiment 2). Moreover, children’s ability to process the eye region did not correlate with their selective visual attention, marking the automation of the mechanism (Experiment 2). In line with recent findings, we suggest here that children rely on a holistic/configural face processing mechanism to process the eye region, composed of multiple features to integrate, which steadily improves with age. [less ▲]

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See detailAge-related differences in evaluating developmental stability
Mustafic, Maida UL; Freund, Alexandra M.

in International Journal of Behavioral Development (2013), 37(4), 376-386

Two studies examined the hypothesis that the evaluation of developmental stability changes across adulthood. Results of Study 1 (N ¼ 119) supported the expectation that older adults (Mage ¼ 65.29 years ... [more ▼]

Two studies examined the hypothesis that the evaluation of developmental stability changes across adulthood. Results of Study 1 (N ¼ 119) supported the expectation that older adults (Mage ¼ 65.29 years)—compared to younger (Mage ¼ 23.38 years) and middle-aged adults (Mage ¼ 38.68 years)—evaluate developmental stability more positively and losses less negatively across all life domains included in this study (subjective well-being, social relationships, cognition, physical functioning). Replicating and extending these findings, Study 2 (N ¼ 182, age-range: 18–86 years) demonstrated that these age-related differences exist only for stability on an explicit and implicit level of evaluation. Moreover, Study 2 shows that the positive evaluation of stability increases after resource investments into maintaining stability were made salient. We discuss the results in relation to motivational orientation and psychological adjustment to developmental change. [less ▲]

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See detailBehaviour difficulties and cognitive function in children born very prematurely
Bayless, S.; Pit-Ten Cate, Ineke UL; Stevenson, J.

in International Journal of Behavioral Development (2008), 32(3), 199-206

Children born very prematurely are at risk of low average IQ and behaviour difficulties throughout childhood and adolescence. Associations among preterm birth, IQ and behaviour have been reported; however ... [more ▼]

Children born very prematurely are at risk of low average IQ and behaviour difficulties throughout childhood and adolescence. Associations among preterm birth, IQ and behaviour have been reported; however, the nature of the relationship among these outcomes is not fully understood. Some studies have proposed that the consequences of preterm birth, such as low average IQ, mediate the association between preterm birth and later behaviour difficulties. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship among preterm birth, IQ and childhood behaviour problems, by testing mediation and moderation models. We assessed a UK sample of 69 very preterm (< 32 weeks gestational age) and 70 term born children aged between 6 and 12 years on an abbreviated IQ test. Parental behaviour ratings were obtained using the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire. Mediation and moderation models were tested using hierarchical regression analyses. The findings indicate that IQ mediates the relationship between birth status and emotional behaviour problems. Furthermore, the results indicate that birth status moderates the relationship between IQ and behavioural difficulties, i.e., that the relationship between low IQ and behaviour problems is most pronounced for the preterm children. The findings highlight the importance of considering indirect effects in the study of outcome after very preterm birth. [less ▲]

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See detailPositivity in aged’s perceptions of intergenerational relationships: A “stake” or a “leniency” effect?
Winkeler, Markus; Filipp, Sigrun-Heide; Boll, Thomas UL

in International Journal of Behavioral Development (2000), 24(2), 173-182

The ‘‘developmental stake hypothesis’’ has been proposed for the frequent finding that aged parents consistently report higher levels of closeness to and consensus with their (adult) children than these ... [more ▼]

The ‘‘developmental stake hypothesis’’ has been proposed for the frequent finding that aged parents consistently report higher levels of closeness to and consensus with their (adult) children than these children do themselves. This study investigated an alternative hypothesis: Drawing on research on prosocial behaviour in old age, it proposes that the aged tend to construe all social relationships in a positively biased manner (‘‘leniency hypothesis’’). Using a quasi-experimental (vignette) approach, scenarios describing two family members discussing a controversial issue were presented to 809 middle-aged (aged 40 to 50 years) and aged subjects (65 to 75 years). The lineage composition of the dyads of family members in the scenarios (i.e. aged parent and adult child vs. two adult siblings) was varied systematically as a between-subjects factor, and the controversial issue was varied as a within-subjects factor. Dependent variables were the participants’ evaluative and prescriptive judgements on the protagonists’ behaviour and the quality of their relationship. Overall, results showed that the aged perceived all scenarios in a significantly more positive light than middle-aged participants, regardless of their lineage composition. Thus, a ‘‘positivity bias’’ was observed in judgements of both intergenerational as well as intragenerational dyads, and it is concluded that the leniency hypothesis provides a better account of these findings than the stake hypothesis. [less ▲]

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See detail„Still stable after all this ...=“: Temporal comparison in coping with severe and chronic disease.
Klauer, Thomas; Ferring, Dieter UL; Filipp, Sigrun-Heide

in International Journal of Behavioral Development (1998), 22(2)

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