References of "FEBS Letters"
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See detailA model of yeast glycolysis based on a consistent kinetic characterisation of all its enzymes
Smallbone, Kieran; Messiha, Hanan L.; Carroll, Kathleen M. et al

in FEBS Letters (2013), 587(17), 2832-2841

We present an experimental and computational pipeline for the generation of kinetic models of metabolism, and demonstrate its application to glycolysis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Starting from an ... [more ▼]

We present an experimental and computational pipeline for the generation of kinetic models of metabolism, and demonstrate its application to glycolysis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Starting from an approximate mathematical model, we employ a ‘‘cycle of knowledge’’ strategy, identifying the steps with most control over flux. Kinetic parameters of the individual isoenzymes within these steps are measured experimentally under a standardised set of conditions. Experimental strategies are applied to establish a set of in vivo concentrations for isoenzymes and metabolites. The data are integrated into a mathematical model that is used to predict a new set of metabolite concentrations and reevaluate the control properties of the system. This bottom-up modelling study reveals that control over the metabolic network most directly involved in yeast glycolysis is more widely distributed than previously thought. [less ▲]

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See detailThe interaction between endogenous calcineurin and the plasma membrane calcium-dependent ATPase is isoform specific in breast cancer cells.
Holton, Marylouisa; Yang, Di; Wang, Weiguang et al

in FEBS letters (2007), 581(21), 4115-9

Plasma membrane calcium/calmodulin-dependent ATPases (PMCAs) are high affinity calcium pumps that extrude calcium from the cell. Emerging evidence suggests a novel role for PMCAs as regulators of calcium ... [more ▼]

Plasma membrane calcium/calmodulin-dependent ATPases (PMCAs) are high affinity calcium pumps that extrude calcium from the cell. Emerging evidence suggests a novel role for PMCAs as regulators of calcium/calmodulin-dependent signal transduction pathways via interaction with specific partner proteins. In this work, we demonstrate that endogenous human PMCA2 and -4 both interact with the signal transduction phosphatase, calcineurin, whereas, no interaction was detected with PMCA1. The strongest interaction was observed between PMCA2 and calcineurin. The domain of PMCA2 involved in the interaction is equivalent to that reported for PMCA4b. PMCA2-calcineurin interaction results in inhibition of the calcineurin/nuclear factor of activated T-cells signalling pathway. [less ▲]

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See detailSTAT1 regulates p73-mediated Bax gene expression
Soond, S. M.; Carroll, C.; Townsend, P. A. et al

in FEBS Letters (2007), 581(6), 1217-26

Although signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1) mediated regulation of p53 transcription and apoptosis has been previously reported, modulation of other members of the p53 family of ... [more ▼]

Although signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1) mediated regulation of p53 transcription and apoptosis has been previously reported, modulation of other members of the p53 family of transcription factors remains poorly understood. In this study, we found that STAT1 and TA-p73 can interact directly and that p73-mediated Bax promoter activity was observed to be reduced by STAT1 expression in a p53-independent manner for which STAT1 Tyrosine-701 and Serine-727 are key residues. This study presents the first report physically linking STAT1 and TA-p73 signalling and highlights the modulation of the Bax promoter in the context of IFN-gamma stimulation. [less ▲]

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See detailA region encompassing the FERM domain of Jak1 is necessary for binding to the cytokine receptor gp130
Hilkens, C. M.; Isharc, H.; Lillemeier, B. F. et al

in FEBS Letters (2001), 505(1), 87-91

The terminal portion of the Janus kinases (Jaks) contains a divergent FERM (Four-point-one, Ezrin, Radixin, Moesin) homology domain comprising 19 conserved hydrophobic regions. To determine the role of ... [more ▼]

The terminal portion of the Janus kinases (Jaks) contains a divergent FERM (Four-point-one, Ezrin, Radixin, Moesin) homology domain comprising 19 conserved hydrophobic regions. To determine the role of this domain in governing recruitment of Jak1, but not Jak3, to the gp130 subunit of the interleukin-6 family of cytokine receptors, the interaction of three Jak1/Jak3 chimeras with gp130 was investigated. Chimeras 1, 2 and 3 (Jak1 FERM regions 1-19, 1-18 and 1-8/Jak3, respectively) were all enzymically active. Chimeras 1 and 2 interacted with the cytoplasmic domain of gp130, although less efficiently than Jak1. Only chimera 2, however, restored gp130 signalling in Jak1-negative cells. The data are consistent with recruitment of Jak1 to gp130 through the Jak1 FERM domain, but also emphasise the likely requirement for precise Jak/receptor orientation to sustain function. [less ▲]

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See detailTermination of IL-6-induced STAT activation is independent of receptor internalization but requires de novo protein synthesis
Thiel, S.; Sommer, U.; Kortylewski, M. et al

in FEBS Letters (2000), 470(1), 15-9

The interleukin-6 (IL-6) receptor complex comprises the IL-6 receptor (IL-6R, gp80) and the signal transducer gp130. Binding of IL-6 to its receptor results in dimerization of gp130, activation of the Jak ... [more ▼]

The interleukin-6 (IL-6) receptor complex comprises the IL-6 receptor (IL-6R, gp80) and the signal transducer gp130. Binding of IL-6 to its receptor results in dimerization of gp130, activation of the Jak/STAT pathway, and in a down-regulation of IL-6 binding sites by endocytosis. The STAT activation after stimulation is transient, being maximal after 15-30 min and disappearing after 60-90 min. The mechanism which leads to the termination of the signal is still unknown.In this paper we have studied whether the down-modulation of the STAT signal requires the endocytosis of the receptor complex. Our results suggest that the desensitization of the IL-6 signal is not due to internalization of the receptor complex but requires de novo protein synthesis. [less ▲]

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See detailDifferential inhibition of IL-6-type cytokine-induced STAT activation by PMA
Terstegen, L.; Maassen, B. G.; Radtke, S. et al

in FEBS Letters (2000), 478(1-2), 100-4

Prior activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases by phorbol 13-myristate 12-acetate (PMA) results in an inhibition of interleukin (IL)-6-induced activation of the Janus kinase/signal transducer and ... [more ▼]

Prior activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases by phorbol 13-myristate 12-acetate (PMA) results in an inhibition of interleukin (IL)-6-induced activation of the Janus kinase/signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) signaling pathway which is most likely mediated by the induction of suppressor of cytokine signaling-3 and requires the specific SHP2 binding site Y759 of the IL-6 signal transducer gp130. In this study, we demonstrate that PMA inhibits STAT activation by IL-6 and the related cytokine leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) but not by oncostatin M (OSM). Since the LIF receptor also contains an SHP2 recruitment site whereas the OSM receptor lacks such a module, we propose that two SHP2 binding modules within a homo- or heterodimeric receptor are necessary to mediate the PMA inhibitory effect. [less ▲]

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See detailCardiac myocytes and fibroblasts contain functional estrogen receptors.
Grohe, C.; Kahlert, S.; Lobbert, K. et al

in FEBS letters (1997), 416(1), 107-12

Gender-based differences found in cardiovascular diseases raise the possibility that estrogen may have direct effects on cardiac tissue. Therefore we investigated whether cardiac myocytes and fibroblasts ... [more ▼]

Gender-based differences found in cardiovascular diseases raise the possibility that estrogen may have direct effects on cardiac tissue. Therefore we investigated whether cardiac myocytes and fibroblasts express functional estrogen receptors. Immunofluorescence demonstrated estrogen receptor protein expression in both female and male rat cardiac myocytes and fibroblasts. Nuclear translocation of the estrogen receptor protein was observed after stimulation of cardiomyocytes with 17beta-estradiol (E2). Cells transfected with an estrogen-responsive reporter plasmid showed that treatment with E2 induced a significant increase in reporter activity. Furthermore, E2 induced a significant increase in expression of the estrogen receptors alpha and beta, progesterone receptor and connexin 43 in cardiac myocytes. Cardiac myocytes and fibroblasts contain functional estrogen receptors and estrogen regulates expression of specific cardiac genes. These data suggest that gender-based differences in cardiac diseases may in part be due to direct effects of estrogen on the heart. [less ▲]

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See detailDivergent sequence motifs correlated with the substrate specificity of (methyl)malonyl-CoA:acyl carrier protein transacylase domains in modular polyketide synthases.
Haydock, S. F.; Aparicio, J. F.; König, Ariane UL et al

in FEBS Letters (1995), 374(2), 246-248

The amino acid sequences of a large number of polyketide synthase domains that catalyse the transacylation of either methylmalonyl-CoA or malonyl-CoA onto acyl carrier protein (ACP) have been compared ... [more ▼]

The amino acid sequences of a large number of polyketide synthase domains that catalyse the transacylation of either methylmalonyl-CoA or malonyl-CoA onto acyl carrier protein (ACP) have been compared. Regions were identified in which the acyltransferase sequences diverged according to whether they were specific for malonyl-CoA or methylmalonyl-CoA. These differences are sufficiently clear to allow unambiguous assignment of newly-sequenced acyltransferase domains in modular polyketide synthases. Comparison with the recently-determined structure of the malonyltransferase from Escherichia coli fatty acid synthase showed that the divergent region thus identified lies near the acyltransferase active site, though not close enough to make direct contact with bound substrate. [less ▲]

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See detailImmediate-early gene induction by repetitive mechanical but not electrical activity in adult rat cardiomyocytes.
Kubisch, C.; Wollnik, B.; Maass, A. et al

in FEBS letters (1993), 335(1), 37-40

Mechanical factors are thought to play an important role in the induction of myocardial hypertrophy. Yet, it is not known whether active contraction induces genes that probably represent initial steps in ... [more ▼]

Mechanical factors are thought to play an important role in the induction of myocardial hypertrophy. Yet, it is not known whether active contraction induces genes that probably represent initial steps in the hypertrophic response in the adult myocardium--and if so, whether the mechanical or the electrical component of the twitch governs this response. We therefore investigated whether electrical stimulation of contraction was able to induce the immediate-early genes (IEGs) egr-1 and c-fos in adult rat cardiomyocytes. Cyclical contraction led to an increase in egr-1 and c-fos mRNA levels within 30 min. Full inhibition of contraction during electrostimulation by the Ca(2+)-desensitizer 2,3-butanedione monoxime (BDM) totally blocked this IEG-response without altering membrane potential. These data suggest that in adult myocardium, the mechanical rather than the electrical activity is responsible for the IEG-response during active twitch. [less ▲]

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See detailAngiotensin II induces formation of the early growth response gene-1 protein in rat vascular smooth muscle cells.
Sachinidis, A.; Weisser, P.; Ko, Y. et al

in FEBS letters (1992), 313(2), 109-12

The effect of angiotensin II (Ang II) on the early growth response gene-1 (Egr-1) mRNA, on the Egr-1 protein and on the phosphoinositide PI turnover signalling system was investigated in the presence and ... [more ▼]

The effect of angiotensin II (Ang II) on the early growth response gene-1 (Egr-1) mRNA, on the Egr-1 protein and on the phosphoinositide PI turnover signalling system was investigated in the presence and absence of EXP3174, a potent non-peptide Ang II receptor antagonist. Ang II induced an accumulation of 3.4 kb Egr-1 mRNA and the 80 kDa Egr-1 protein, with a maximum at 30 min and 60 min, respectively. EXP3174 blocked the Ang II-induced increase of inositol phosphates, Egr-1 mRNA and the Egr-1 protein, suggesting the involvement of the PI signalling system by the expression of the Egr-1 gene. [less ▲]

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